SMC blood drive sees large turnout

first_imgAs a way of helping meet the American Red Cross’s need for blood donations, Saint Mary’s College hosted a blood drive Monday.“Believe it or not, there is always a need for blood,” Olivia Critchlow, assistant director of the Office for Civic and Social Engagement, said. “We feel that it’s part of one’s civic duty to donate if possible.”The drive was held in the College’s Student Center Lounge from noon to 6 p.m., and was one of four blood drives the College offers each academic year.At Monday’s drive, more than 90 people had signed up to donate blood, Critchlow said. She also said students were able to continue to sign up throughout the drive, and walk-ins were also accepted.“It is important to donate blood because there is always a need for it in the community,” Critchlow said. “Blood cannot be manufactured, so the only way to fulfill the need for it is through volunteer donations.”Critchlow said the actual blood donation takes less than 10 to 12 minutes on average. Additionally, the entire blood donation process takes less than one hour.Sophomore Katie Cireski donated blood Monday to help fill a need.“There’s a need for blood and there are so many people that are eligible that don’t donate, so I figured since I am eligible to donate, I might as well,” sophomore Katie Ciresi said. “I think it’s something important to do and I think everyone should do it at least once in their life, if not more.” Junior Grace Sadowski also said she believes it is important to donate blood — so important that she has been a donor about 15 times.“I’ve always given it,” she said. “My little sister was premature and people that gave blood saved her life so I always do.”Sadowski said she thinks there is a higher need than ever before for blood donations and encouraged others to donate.“I personally can’t save people’s lives, so I feel like this is helping as much as I can,” she said. “I think more people should do it and it’s not as scary as everyone thinks. Families that do have blood donated to them are really appreciative.”According to a press release form the American Red Cross, the blood drive held Monday was parte of the “Stave a Vampire. Donate Blood” campaign.As part of the campaign, two $50 shopping sprees were given away in a drawing. Those who donated blood were entered.In addition to the blood drive held Monday, other drives for the campaign will be held in the area. On April 26 and April 27, blood drives will be held in 315 LaFortune Student Center at Notre Dame.Three $50 shopping sprees will be given away each day during the blood drives held at the University.last_img read more

Continue reading

Alcoholic energy drinks discussed

first_imgAt Monday’s Campus Life Council (CLC) meeting, members discussed a memo presented by Brian Coughlin, assistant vice president for student activities and head of the recently-assembled Alcohol Energy Drink (AED) Working Group. The memo discussed the progress of the group in responding to issues related to student use of caffeinated alcoholic beverages. The memo stated that, while the FDA and other governmental agencies have already taken steps to limit or ban the popular Four Loko and Joose drinks, AEDs are still a concern because “some students may still have ‘original’ formula AEDs and/or some students may attempt to make their own should the pre-packaged products no longer be available.” The memo went on to say the group has not yet decided upon a recommendation to give Fr. Tom Doyle, vice president for student affairs. It has considered three options: banning AEDs across campus, leaving the issue to the discretion of individual rectors, and establishing no formal policy. The group did, however, indicate it would make continued efforts to increase awareness about the effects of AEDs to students, an idea that Knott Hall senator Alex Kasparie thought would be more effective than a ban. “I think the biggest thing is the education. I hate to say it, but usually I take a ban as a challenge,” he said. “No ban is going to change the attitude.” CLC member Ben Noe, a sophomore, suggested emphasizing the fact that AEDs are extremely high in calories as a way to deter students from consuming them. “We thought it would be pertinent to Notre Dame students who seem to be particularly health conscious,” he said. “Not only that these drinks are dangerous, but also that they are unhealthy for you calorie-wise.” Christopher Haug, assistant director for residence life and housing, thought raising this point with students could lead to other unhealthy behavior. “Unfortunately, one of the things we found out across the country is that people do know that, so sometimes they won’t eat dinner and will drink the Four Loko,” he said. “Then they’ll have nothing to metabolize the alcohol with.” Noe went on to say that the availability and consumption of non-alcoholic energy drinks on campus is a concern within itself. Julia Sutton, SUB director, said the University could only go so far in managing students’ decisions. “Can’t anything be harmful if overused?” she said. “I think the University can’t go that far. You can’t take energy drinks out of The Huddle unless you take Burger King out.” Student body vice president Andrew Bell highlighted the aspects of alcohol education that his culture shift task force, which is examining drinking at Notre Dame, plans to address specifically. “One of the things is the continuous education, that it’s not just overload during your first months at school,” he said. Bell said educating students about Indiana-specific alcohol laws, increasing student-led alcohol education, and informing students how to help a friend in a dangerous situation will be emphasized in the future.last_img read more

Continue reading

Expert examines nations’ democratization

first_imgPoliticians often speak to democratization in the Middle East, but rarely about how the process works. On Tuesday, Dr. Ali Mazrui picked up where they left off, with his lecture “Democratizing Muslim Societies from Above and Below: Between Atatürk and Tahrir Square” in the Hesburgh Center for International Studies. Before the lecture, Scott Appleby, director of the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies introduced Mazrui as “one of the leading thinkers about Islam politics and culture in the world.” Mazrui, Director of the Institute of Global Cultural Studies at Binghamton University and Senior Fellow at the Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Center for Muslim-Christian Understanding at Georgetown University, said his talk focused on Ataturk and Tahrir Square because these revolutions represented the most striking examples of democratization from above and below, respectively, in the history of the Middle East. “The most spectacular [example] of democracy above is still the case of revolution of Atatürk in 1920s and 1930s,” Mazrui said. “The most spectacular [example] of democracy below is in Tunisia and Tahrir Square in Cairo – which ousted Hosni Mubarak in February of 2011.”  Mazrui said the revolution of Ataturk, which brought democracy to Turkey in the 1920s and 1930s, is still remembered in Turkey and other Muslim nations. He said when visiting the Middle East he has seen images of the Atatürk Revolution all over the place. Mazrui also said the Ataturk revolution in many ways “westernized” Turkey. “Turkey’s democratization from above was simultaneously Turkey’s westernization from above,” he said. This has led Muslims in other nations to wonder whether or not such westernization is an inevitable part of becoming more democratic, Mazrui said. Throughout the Muslim world people are asking themselves the same question, he said. “Can we liberally democratize without culturally westernizing?,” he said. Mazrui also said there was a strong link between education and modernity, as well as between empowering women and modernity, in Turkish society.  Mazrui then transitioned to a discussion of democratization from below. His example for this form of democratization was the recent revolution in Egypt sparked by the Tahrir Square protests. He said the Tahrir Square revolution as an example of democratization from below highlights one drawback of this approach. “Democratization from below was effective in ending the old [regime] rather than starting a new [regime],” he said. “The Tahrir Square Revolution ousted the old empire, but it’s hard to tell the influence it will have later.” The importance of women in the liberalization of the Arab world was also highlighted in Egypt’s revolution, Mazrui said. “Women were very visible participants in the Tahrir protests,” he said. “Historically, Egypt led the way with women’s liberation.” Mazrui said the main problem going forward in Egypt is the removal of President Hosni Mubarak, which has left Egyptians thinking they can remove each succeeding president. “Egyptian populations feel if you have appointed a President and he has not delivered the goods that you want, then you should throw him out,” Mazrui said. “It is a ridiculous situation in Egypt because it has resulted in major reverses in the social liberalizations and the deaths of at least a thousand people since the uprisings took off.”  Mazrui said the number of pro-democratic uprisings in the Arab world in recent years is unprecedented in the course of history. He also said this democratization in the Arab world can continue, especially if the secrets of revolutions like those of Ataturk and Tahrir Square are uncovered and employed. “[The] empowerment of women to the top of the political scale is one such secret,” Mazrui said.last_img read more

Continue reading

Man pulled from St. Mary’s Lake, arrested after lengthy police chase

first_imgOn Dec. 22, Notre Dame students and staff received an email from the University reporting an incident that had occurred earlier that day on campus. The email reported that a suspect being pursued by Mishawaka police had been pulled out of St. Mary’s Lake and taken into custody by police.“Just before noon on Dec. 22, NDSP received a call of a suspicious vehicle in the [Hesburgh] Library [parking] lot, and upon investigation, officers learned that the vehicle was one that Mishawaka police had been pursuing,” Notre Dame Security Police (NDSP) director Phillip Johnson said. “As officers from other agencies arrived on campus, NDSP dispatch center received a call reporting an attempt to steal a delivery truck near the Main Building. Officers arrived on the scene within one minute of the call reporting the attempted robbery.”According to a news release issued by the Mishawaka Police Department (MPD), the suspect was 23-year-old Joshua Ringle.Upon the arrival of NDSP officers at the library, Ringle fled, Johnson said.“The suspect ran to the lake and jumped into the water. The man claimed to be armed but no weapon was seen, and no weapon was found,” Johnson said. “This situation was contained within two and half minutes after receiving the call reporting the attempted robbery.“The suspect was rescued from the frigid water after about 30 minutes. Officers from NDSP, [St. Joseph] County Police and [the South Bend Police Department], using a [Notre Dame Fire Department] rescue boat, pulled the suspect to safety.”According to the MPD news release, Mishawaka police had tried to apprehend Ringle after he had violated a protective order several hours earlier, but Ringle fled.“Ringle, while fleeing police, entered a home on Lowell Wood, confronted the homeowner and took her gray Subaru Forrester. Ringle drove through the lowered garage door, refusing to stop for officers,” the news release said.Ringle then drove off with the Mishawaka Police in pursuit, the news release said. The officers lost sight of Ringle due to heavy holiday traffic, the news release said.“Officers were informed by dispatch that witnesses called, stating the gray SUV had been involved in a rollover crash at [the intersection of] Grape Rd. and Douglas. The gray SUV rolled over, ending upright on its wheels and left west on Douglas,” the news release said.Shortly after, officers were told a gray SUV and man matching Ringle’s description were in the library parking lot at Notre Dame, the news release said.“NDSP officers, along with Mishawaka, South Bend, and [St. Joseph] County Police worked in a coordinated effort to contain the suspect and establish a safe zone around the area of the St. Mary’s Lake,” Johnson said. “NDFD’s staff was alerted to be on standby for any emergency medical services and to provide a rescue boat for police.”After refusing officers’ orders to come out of the water, Ringle was safely pulled from the water by police and treated by fire department medics, Johnson said. Ringle was then taken to a local hospital to be treated for hypothermia, the news release said.Johnson said NDSP works with other local law enforcement entities in a unified command structure.“There was an incredibly rapid response by officers from all area agencies, and officers performed in an exceptional manner, working patiently and safely to resolve this situation without injury,” Johnson said. “I am extremely proud of the coordinated police and fire response to this incident.”The safety of all staff and students is the priority of NDSP in situations such as these, Johnson said.“The situation was very quickly contained and a perimeter was established around the scene to keep people at a safe distance,” Johnson said. “Nevertheless, out of an abundance of caution, we used the campus public address system (IPPA) to ask people to stay away from the area of the lakes.“When the suspect was rescued from the water, an all-clear message was broadcast.“Based on feedback — and we evaluate our response to all major incidents as part of continuous improvement — the ND Alert system using text, telephone calls, email messages as well as the public address system would have been more effective than the public address system alone.” Tags: John Ringle, lake, lake incident, Mishawaka Police Department, MPD, NDSP, Notre Dame Security Police, St. Mary’s Lakelast_img read more

Continue reading

Environmental engineering program earns accreditation

first_imgNotre Dame’s environmental engineering program has now earned accreditation from the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET). “There’s a process by which you first have to go through several years of your program, collect materials and information about your students and graduates, present that [to ABET] and then they consider you for accreditation,” said Robert Nerenberg, associate professor in the College of Engineering.Incoming sophomores in the fall of 2013 were among the first students who participated in the environmental engineering program. Since then, the department has graduated 50 environmental engineering students.The accreditation is retroactive to Oct. 1, 2015, meaning those alumni who graduated in the past now have accredited degrees, associate teaching professor Liz Kerr said. Kerr also currently serves as director of undergraduate studies in the Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering & Earth Sciences.“The alumni that we have were the trailblazers,” Kerr said. “They were confident that they wanted to be in this major, and they trusted that we would get the degree accredited so they could have a more meaningful degree and get an engineering license.”Nerenberg said it is a normal and natural step when a new degree is implemented to go through the accreditation process, and the department was accredited without any modifications.Separately offering the environmental engineering degree and changing the name of the department from Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences to Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences helped students become more aware of the environmental aspect, Nerenberg said.The University’s environmental engineering program offers a variety of opportunities to engage students in the industry by combining practical environmental engineering projects with a strong theoretical foundation, Kerr said.She said the students work on a local design project their senior year with other environmental and civil engineers to benefit the city of South Bend.“This year they will be working on two different projects,” Kerr said. “There’s a western avenue project where they’re working on separating the combined sewer system and creating green infrastructure to help mitigate flooding during storm events, and then they’re also working on a project to upgrade the water treatment facility.”Kerr said by bringing in community members and engaging the students with community projects, they receive a more realistic experience in the field.Nerenberg said because all of the faculty in the department are active in research, undergraduates have more opportunities to be involved in research which allows the students to be further immersed in the field.With growing problems including climate change, water scarcity and population growth, the field of environmental engineering will become even more prevalent, Nerenberg said.“I think anyone who’s good at math and science and is interested in technical things should take a look at environmental engineering because we really are able to serve the public in a very direct way,” Nerenberg said. “We work on behalf of municipalities, state and federal governments looking after the health and safety of people.”Tags: Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, College of Engineering, Environmental Engineeringlast_img read more

Continue reading

Carroll Hall to host Lakeside Music Festival

first_imgCarroll Hall will host their signature event, Lakeside Music Festival, Saturday at 2 p.m. to exhibit student bands and musical talents. “Lakeside was started about five years ago, and its main aim is to better the music culture here at Notre Dame, because honestly in some aspects it’s pretty lacking,” junior Christian Cyrul, the commissioner in charge of the festival, said. “It’s just a fun time, a whole afternoon where people can enjoy music from student bands and also for student bands to get recognition.” Courtesy of Dani Meersman Students gather at the 2017 Lakeside Music Festival for an afternoon of entertainment, where all proceeds were donated to the Boys and Girls Club of South Bend.Unlike in previous years, this year’s Lakeside Music Fesitival was co-sponsored by the Student Union Board (SUB), which gave the event more funding to work with. “SUB got involved with it through Christian Cyrul,” senior Bailey Kendall, a director of programming for SUB, said. “He presented us with this really cool opportunity to help fundraise for a good cause and also it fits with SUB’s mission really well.” SUB, in general, looks to fund events that foster inclusivity across the student body, she said.“There’s no cap on the capacity of people that can go to Lakeside, which was something that was really important to us,” Kendall said. “It’s an inclusive event, its free, anyone can go to it, so we co-sponsored it to add more cool things to it.”Senior Bethany Boggess, executive director of SUB, said the collaboration was made possible in part because of extra money in the SUB budget. “The reason we had the awesome opportunity to sponsor Lakeside this year is because we had sort of a transition year with CJF, the Collegiate Jazz Festival, where we were able to work out a collaboration with them for CJF,” Boggess said. “So we had some money left over in our budget.”Boggess also said the co-sponsorship was a natural fit, especially given the similarities in purpose between CJF and Lakeside. “What we wanted to do was to find a way to spend that extra money in a meaningful way that still kind of went to the heart of what CJF does for students [and] provides entertainment via music to students,” Boggess said. “That’s the same thing Lakeside accomplishes, as well, so it was kind of a natural sponsorship for us and a great way for us to add to an already amazing event.”  Cyrul said the additional funding has allowed the event to be more ambitious, with funds going toward food trucks, better-quality shirts and more advertising.  “Last year we had to kind of go to a bunch of different places to get funds and really didn’t have enough to have a lot of the free food we’re going to have this year,” Cyrul said. “So a lot of that funding is going toward the food trucks, and so those are going to be free for all students who come. We’ll have over 900 meals throughout the day.”Cyrul said he also pushed for including more South Bend music culture in the event.“This year, I’ve kind of expanded [the event] a little bit by trying to bridge the gap between South Bend and Notre Dame,” Cyrul said. “So we’re advertising a lot to the South Bend community, and we’re also inviting a couple of South Bend bands to come and perform as well.” Cyrul said the event is made up of 12 acts. Performers range from single acts to duos and bands — some even including professors.While the event is free to attend and open to all, one of Lakeside’s main goals is fundraising, mainly through the Lakeside shirts which will be sold at the event. All the proceeds go to the Boys and Girls Club in South Bend, Cyrul said. Cyrul said the event’s relaxed nature is important to the overall Lakeside experience.“The atmosphere going forward is not necessarily like a nighttime concert where everyone is focused on the stage but more of a chance to just gather with your friends, hang out in the sun and listen to some awesome music,” he said.Tags: Carroll Hall, Lakeside, lakeside music festival, Student Union Board, SUBlast_img read more

Continue reading

Parts Of I-90 Closed As State Police Investigation Continues

first_imgImage by Justin Gould/WNYNewsNow.HANOVER – All westbound and eastbound lanes of I-90 between exits 57 and 58 are currently closed as State Police say they are continuing an investigation into a menacing complaint involving a shotgun.Police say, at approximately 9:35 a.m., they located and stopped a vehicle in question near mile marker 455.1 westbound. After a physical confrontation with Troopers, police say the suspect was taken into custody. transported for treatment.Several weapons and a suspicious package were located in the vehicle. The State Police Bomb Disposal Unit were called to the scene to assist with the investigation.Police say the roads will be closed until the scene is clear. More information will be released when it becomes available.Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Continue reading

COVID-19 Cases Increase To Seven In Chautauqua County

first_imgMAYVILLE – Officials in Chautauqua County say the number of confirmed COVID-19 cases have increased to seven.During Saturday’s update by the Chautauqua County COVID-19 Response Team, officials said the two new cases include a woman in her 70s, with no recent travel, and a woman in her 30s, with no recent travel outside the country, but had travel to Erie County, New York.“Based on the initial review of each case by Health Department epidemiology staff, these individuals appear to have had separate exposures to the novel coronavirus,” officials said. “Both of these individuals will continue to recover at home under mandatory isolation as ordered by the Local Health Official per NYS Public Health Law.”Chautauqua County Public Health staff is now conducting an investigation to identify close contacts of the new cases. “Once identified, our department notifies the close contacts of their potential exposure to COVID-19 and they are placed under mandatory or precautionary quarantine to monitor for symptoms,” officials said. “If you do not personally hear from a public health nurse, you are not a close contact of an individual who has been confirmed to have COVID-19.”State guidelines say close contact refers to a person who cared for or lived with a person with COVID-19. It does not include activities such as walking by a person or sitting across a waiting room or office for a brief time.Additionally, the number of those under some type of quarantine is as follows:21 people are now in Mandatory Quarantine (individuals confirmed positive of COVID-19 or a household contact of a confirmed positive COVID-19 case); 38 individuals in Precautionary Quarantine (individuals with travel history to CDC level 3 country or proximal contact of a confirmed case of COVID-19);25 individuals in Mandatory Isolation (individuals who are symptomatic of COVID-19 and are pending COVID-19 lab test).So far the county has received 84 negative test results to date.The County COVID-19 Response Team continues to meet daily during this pandemic and urges residents to please stay home and stay safe.  “Limit your trips to the grocery store to once a week if possible, remember to use social distancing, and avoid gathering in groups,” officials furthered. MGN Image Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window),Why are we not being told what town/area these new cases are from?,How about the number of people that have been tested like other counties are doinglast_img read more

Continue reading

City Leaders Planning ‘Reverse’ Jamestown Christmas Parade

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window),Fantastic idea! People who are elderly or unable to stand for a parade will be able to participate, and no worries about babies being cold. It will be great to have this to look forward to! Image by Matt Hummel / WNY News Now.JAMESTOWN – COVID-19 concerns canceled this year’s Jamestown Christmas Parade, however, local leaders are planning a similar festive event to ring in holiday cheer.Jamestown Mayor Eddie Sundquist, speaking at Thursday’s City Council Public Safety Committee Meeting, says a “reverse” Christmas parade will be taking place instead.He says city officials will be encouraging businesses and organizations to decorate parking spaces along Third Street, similar to how they would build a float.Then, residents would be encouraged to drive down the street to view the displays from the safety of their vehicles. The annual lighting of the Christmas Tree, a traditional Santa Clause and music will also take place.The Mayor says the idea originates from Geneva, New York, which hosted a similar event on Halloween.Businesses who want to participate would need to fill out an application online.The modified parade will be held Friday, December 4, from 6 p.m.  to 7:30 p.m. with the tree lighting taking place beforhand.The Chautauqua County Chamber of Commerce and Jamestown Renaissance Cooperation will help contribute to the event as well, the Mayor says.last_img read more

Continue reading

Show the World! Watch Carole King & Sara Bareilles Perform ‘Beautiful’ & ‘Brave’ Musical Mash-Up at the Grammys

first_img Related Shows As far as singer-songwriters go, it doesn’t get any better than the legendary Carole King, the subject of the new Broadway musical Beautiful. Actually, the only thing that could make a live perfomance from King any better is the addition of fellow ivory-tickler Sara Bareilles, which is exactly what happened at the 56th Grammy Awards telecast. Bareilles, who was nominated for two Grammy Awards including Album of the Year, performed her hit song “Brave,” alongside King, who opened the performance with a rendition of her song “Beautiful.” The rest was musical magic. Bonus: the duo was introduced by Tony and Grammy winner Cyndi Lauper! Check out the performance below!  Star Files Show Closed This production ended its run on Oct. 27, 2019 View Comments Beautiful: The Carole King Musical Sara Bareilleslast_img read more

Continue reading