Old meets new in modern reno

first_imgThe ultra modern extension at the rear of the original houseMore from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus17 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market17 hours agoEntry to the top floor is via staircase on to a covered veranda. A hallway leads to four bedrooms and a family bathroom at the front of the house, a study and the main bedroom with walk-in wardrobe and ensuite.On the upper floor, there is a state of the art kitchen with Quantum Quartz benchtops, a largecentral island bench with bar seating, streamlined cabinets, a glass window splashback and topof the range appliances. Before the renovationMs Mienert said the renovation had been a worthwhile challenge, saying it was important to respect the local heritage.And the results speak for themselves.The architecturally-designed house is now a contemporary six bedroom residence, with four bathrooms. The original living room The kitchen before the reno The new living area in the extensionOther features include ceiling fans in all rooms, ducted airconditioning on level one with the top floor enjoying natural breezes, a mix of timber floorboards, ceramic tiles and carpet, and a carport with storage and rainwater tank.Ms Mienert said they had loved living at the property but had bought another “reno delight” close by.“I must be mad,” she said.She said she would be sad to leave the property, saying it was a “wonderful area to raise a family”.The house is being marketed by Jason Adcock of Adcock Prestige. The kitchen now … wow!Wide sliding doors lead from the living area out to a pool, a terrace, and there is another deck with built-in gas barbecue off the kitchen.On the ground level, there is space for three vehicles, a guest bedroom, a second living area, a laundry and bathroom. Look at it now! 31 Brook St in South Brisbane has had a new lease on lifeTHIS cottage, built in the early 1900s, has been fully renovated but if you look closely you can still see some of the old world charm.The six bedroom house at 31 Brook St in South Brisbane is owned by Leah Mienert and her family, and was restored over a year, with a modern extension giving it a new lease on life.“I bought it back in 2011 but it was in a demolition control precinct so we had to maintain the cottage,” she said. “It had been used as a rental and already been extended so it was a bit of rabbit warren.“We stripped it right back and renovated it and I am so glad we did because it really gives it some uniqueness and blends in with the local area.”last_img read more

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Dominican journalist encouraged to acquaint themselves with a Broadcast Act

first_img Sharing is caring! NewsRegional Dominican journalist encouraged to acquaint themselves with a Broadcast Act by: – October 13, 2011 Tweet Share Sharecenter_img Vice President of ACM Peter Richards. Image via: GIS NewsLocal Journalists are being encouraged to acquaint themselves with a Broadcast Act for Dominica.Vice President of the Association of Caribbean Media Workers Peter Richards who is taking part in the ACM’s 10th Regional Conference in Dominica says the ramifications of such a code must be understood.He says journalists must have an input in the configuration of the Act.“The ACM has been part of the whole exercise in trying to get journalist in Dominica and the region to get aquatinted with it. We are looking at it from a sub regional position. We have already brought down an official from the International Human Rights organization to help Dominican journalist to understand the ramifications of such a code,” he said.He said journalist must have an input into the code.“Every country has a broadcast code, the US, the UK, Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago, but what happens is that you see the impute of the journalist organization into this code, so it’s not something that was just pulled out of the sky an allowed to fall into place,” he said.He said the Media Workers Association of Dominica should be strong and vocal enough to have their concerns reflected in the regulation.Dominica Vibes News 123 Views   no discussions Sharelast_img read more

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Arsenal miss out on Brazilian target Bruno Guimaraes

first_imgLyon have confirmed the signing of Brazilian midfielder Bruno Guimaraes from Athletico Paranaense on a four-and-a-half year contract for a transfer fee of £17million.Advertisement Guimaraes, targeted by several European clubs including Arsenal and Atletico Madrid, will arrive in Lyon on either February 10 or 11 after he fulfils commitments with the Brazil Under-23 team in a qualifying event for the Olympic Games in Tokyo. Read also: Pablo Mari: Flamengo defender joins Arsenal on loanHe will become the 20th Brazilian player to represent Lyon, following in the footsteps of Giovane Elber, Juninho and Fred among others.Rudi Garcia’s Lyon are fifth in Ligue 1 with 32 points from 21 games. They will take on Nice in the last 16 of the French Cup later on Thursday before visiting the same team in the league three days later.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Loading… center_img Lyon said in a statement that they would receive 20 per cent from any future sale of the Brazilian Olympic team captain.The versatile 22-year-old scored 10 goals in 105 matches for Athletico Paranaense and helped them win the Copa Sudamericana in 2018 and Copa do Brasil in 2019. Promoted ContentWhich Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?7 Reasons It’s Better To Be A Vegan5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme Parks6 Extreme Facts About Hurricanes10 Risky Jobs Some Women DoHere Are The Top 10 Tiniest Mobile Phones On The Planet!8 Fascinating Facts About CoffeeEver Thought Of Sleeping Next To Celebs? This Guy Will Show You13 kids at weddings who just don’t give a hootCouples Who Celebrated Their Union In A Unique, Unforgettable WayEverything You Need To Know About Asteroid ArmageddonThis Guy Photoshopped Himself Into Celeb Pics And It’s Hystericallast_img read more

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DOH grants 1,500 drug-testing kits to Aklan State University

first_imgRamel Buncalan, president of the AklanBaghay (Bagong Buhay) Incorporated, said they welcomed the initiative in makingthe state university a drug-free institution. Kalibo, Aklan – The Department of Health has provided around 1,500drug-testing kits to the Aklan State University (ASU).  The distribution of the testing kitsfor the faculty and students is currently up to the ASU administration. center_img Atty. Flosemer Chris Gonzales, vicechairman of the Provincial Advisory Council for Police Transformation andDevelopment, said they have partnered with ASU for the implementation of theprogram which was also supported by the Association of the Municipal HealthOfficers of the Philippines, the Philippine Drug Enforcement Agency and theProvincial Anti-Drug Abuse Council./PNlast_img read more

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Redknapp always believed in Rio

first_img Redknapp added: “I loaned him to Bournemouth and Man United came in. (Chairman) Martin Edwards rang Bournemouth football club, he rang Mel Machin who was the manager and asked Mel how much he wanted for the young centre-half. “They’d seen him play on the Saturday at Rochdale or somewhere and Mel said ‘well he’s only on loan, he belongs to West Ham’. Martin Edwards didn’t realise that. “He came on and wanted to buy him and I said ‘he hasn’t got a price, he’ll be the best defender in Europe one day’. Eventually he ended up at Man United but for an awful lot of money.” Ferdinand has cited a desire to focus on his club career as one of the reasons for his decision to exit the international stage and Redknapp believes he still has a lot to offer to incoming United boss David Moyes. “People say he has lost his pace,” he added. “Well he may have lost a yard but he is still as quick as anybody because he was so quick (to begin with). “I’m sure he will do a great job for David if he sees him in his plans at Old Trafford.” Ferdinand confirmed his decision on Wednesday morning, the day before Roy Hodgson is due to name his England squad for the friendlies against Republic of Ireland and Brazil. Harry Redknapp claims he knew Rio Ferdinand would become one of the best defenders in the world from a young age in the wake of the Manchester United centre-half announcing his international retirement. QPR boss Redknapp was in charge at West Ham when Ferdinand made his England debut in 1997 and the 34-year-old went on to make 80 more appearances for his country while playing for Leeds and at Old Trafford. “We knew from day one he was going to be a special player,” Redknapp told talkSPORT. “He was lightning quick and graceful on the ball. He had everything.” center_img Press Associationlast_img read more

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Neville to join Moyes at United

first_img Press Association Phil Neville is set to become the latest recruit to David Moyes’ coaching team at Manchester United. Although there has been no official confirmation, it is understood Neville was at the renamed Aon training complex on Thursday morning for the first full day of training since Moyes was installed as Sir Alex Ferguson’s replacement. It would represent yet another switch from Everton following the earlier appointments of Steve Round, Chris Woods and Jimmy Lumsden. However, in Neville’s case it also brings a vast amount of experience of life at United. Neville made 386 appearances in 11 seasons as a first-team player with the Red Devils. center_img During that time he won six Premier League titles, three FA Cups and the Champions League before leaving to join Everton in 2005, where he overcame some initial scepticism to become a crowd favourite. Neville confirmed his intention to retire at the end of last season, although new Everton boss Roberto Martinez had claimed he intended to speak with the 36-year-old about a coaching role. However, a return to the club he supported as a boy was always likely to prove attractive and it is no surprise Moyes has opted to build on the close working relationship he developed with Neville during their time together at Goodison Park. Neville has never made any secret of his desire to push forward with a coaching career and this summer was part of Stuart Pearce’s backroom team at the European Under-21 Championship. In addition to bringing a sense of continuity following the departures of not only Ferguson but also his assistants Mike Phelan, Eric Steele and Rene Meulensteen, Neville will provide a useful link between the dressing room and the manager. There has still been no word on Wayne Rooney’s status though, with the formal talks that had been anticipated on Wednesday apparently put on hold. Rooney has returned for pre-season in good condition though, which, by his own admission, has not always been the case. And despite the massive upheaval at Old Trafford this summer, that has also seen the exit of chief executive David Gill, the atmosphere is said to be upbeat ahead of the new campaign, which begins next Wednesday when United head off on their five-match summer tour of the Far East and Australia. last_img read more

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SETTLING IN: Asa Goldstock, mentored by an all-time SU great, fights to figure out how to shine in her new home

first_img Published on February 4, 2018 at 9:11 pm Contact Michael: mmcclear@syr.edu | @MikeJMcCleary,Comments are closed. Comments Asa Goldstock’s first look into her lacrosse future happened shortly after she picked up a newspaper in late November 2010. The story that stuck out: a local name she knew well had committed to one of the nation’s top lacrosse schools. She headed to recreation league practice that day with a goal set for the years ahead.“I just hoped I’d be on the newspaper the day I committed,” Goldstock said.The name in the headline was Kayla Treanor. She was a model for many lacrosse players in Niskayuna, New York, the Albany suburb where they lived, and eventually set a standard for success across the country. She became the all-time goals leader (260) at Syracuse, a mark that ranks sixth in NCAA history, and was declared the “greatest Syracuse player of all time,” by SU head coach Gary Gait. But none idolized her more than Goldstock, who’d been a recognized lacrosse talent since middle school.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textNow a sophomore at Syracuse, Goldstock has admired Treanor since she was about 10 years old. Goldstock’s upbringing laid the framework for what would eventually be her future home. It elevated her to 2016’s No. 3 recruit and the top-ranked goalie, per Inside Lacrosse. Treanor and Goldstock’s partnership created a family-like bond that follows Goldstock with every new step she takes and as she aims to mold herself into the player everyone predicted she could be.“(Kayla)’s everything,” Goldstock said. “I work so hard because I want to be half the player she is.”But, at SU, Goldstock’s numbers don’t tell the same story as Treanor’s did early in her career. Last season, as a freshman, she ranked 51st in the country in goals-against average (11.96), 65th in save percentage (.412) and was often the last woman to beat on the scoring defense that ranked 55th out of 111 teams.Kevin Camelo | Digital Design EditorComing to SU the same year as the shot clock changed the college game did no favors for her performance, said Halley Quillinan Griggs, the women’s editor at Inside Lacrosse and a former Syracuse player. This year, Syracuse added the No. 1 goalie recruit in the last recruiting cycle in Hannah Van Middelem. Though Gait said Goldstock is the Orange’s “No. 1” that SU will continue to play to if she’s “lights out,” he provided no guarantees that Goldstock’s job remains entirely secure.“Anything can happen,” Gait said. “It’s lacrosse.”The divide between her peers’ anticipation and her actuality was hard to understand for those who followed her earlier in her career, who spoke highly of her natural ability. Goldstock still had it. They could see it with her dazzling stick work as she soft tossed with teammates. She still cradled and twisted the ball in her stick pocket and made passes behind her back with precision.Those close to Goldstock remember her finest moments, the ones when she imitated skills Treanor used in post-practice shooting sessions with Goldstock since eighth grade. They remember the clearing ability, the speed out of the net, the aggressiveness to attack the ball and push it ahead.Yet the same tendencies to test her own limits that refined her elite skills and set her apart are the ones enabling her mistakes.When Goldstock hit adversity for the first time at SU, Gait afforded her time to try and figure things out because, though Syracuse’s up-and-down performance reflected her adjustment to the college game, she always found herself nestled comfortably in the starting goalkeeper’s position.But following the Orange’s earliest exit from the NCAA tournament in a year it qualified since 2006, the Orange needs more. And she expects it.“I don’t think I’ll ever not think I could play better,” Goldstock said. “I know I can.”• • •Growing up in Niskayuna, Goldstock always knew of Treanor, because her lacrosse talent brought the spotlight to a close-knit community. The two first met when Treanor served as one of Goldstock’s coaches on her recreation league team, where Goldstock picked up playing goalie. A converted attack from when she played in a boys’ league at a young age, Goldstock started making plays in and out of the net, in part due to her advanced strength and size for her age.By the time Goldstock was in middle school, she had already found herself developing into the best goalie in her hometown. In eighth grade, she won the starting job on the Niskayuna High School varsity team. From her spot in goal, she spied then-senior and Syracuse-bound Treanor playing up the field. It seemed that Treanor noticed Goldstock, too.“Kayla always had this great way of seeing players with great potential,” said Ritchie Assini, Treanor’s long-time friend and former teammate.,But with Goldstock, there seemed to be more. Treanor took Goldstock “under her wing,” Goldstock said.Goldstock said she had a rough home life and didn’t have the best relationship with her father, L.J., whom she lived with in Niskayuna following her parents’ divorce at a young age. She lived with her father from age 10 to 16.After the separation, Tiffany Moore, Goldstock’s mother, had moved about an hour north of New York City to Middletown, but Goldstock stayed in Niskayuna because Middletown didn’t have lacrosse.Goldstock still calls Moore her “best friend and biggest supporter” and said Moore has helped guide her through some of the biggest changes in her life, like swapping high schools.Moore declined to be interviewed for this story and L.J. did not respond to a request for comment from The Daily Orange.So, Treanor began taking responsibility for Goldstock’s well-being on the field, Goldstock said. The senior would drive her to practice and keep her to shoot afterward as both players honed their craft.Treanor showed Goldstock every shot in her arsenal and the eighth grader began picking up skills. As their bond quickly became less of teammates and more of close family members, Treanor said the things they did for one another became less significant, because they were supposed to do them. They were “sisters.”“With Kayla, her actions speak louder than words,” Assini said. “It might be hard to express with her words how much someone means to her. We’ll never get it out of Kayla how much Asa means to her.”Treanor’s family eventually became the same to Goldstock, and she started spending large amounts of time at their house and slept there some nights. She “wasn’t really happy living at home,” she said, and eventually started living with the Treanors full time.“I kind of just moved in,” Goldstock said. “Now, I live there.”Treanor’s home became Goldstock’s. In the bedroom the Treanors now call “The Dormitory,” Goldstock said there are two queen beds. One for Treanor, one for Goldstock. And for the rest of her time at home she stayed there before she set off for her new home in Syracuse.• • •No one plays goalie like Goldstock, those close to her who play the sport said. She insists she brings something new to the table even if it is a trait that scares some individuals.“Doing flashy things like (throwing long clears) is pretty fun,” Goldstock said. “People take it too seriously sometimes, so it’s kind of fun to do things that people want to see.”Those risks have paid off. In the Under Armour All-American game in her senior year of high school, she excited the crowd and the ESPNU viewers with a booming clear that made it all the way down field and into the pocket of an attacker who scored. Goldstock got the assist.Treanor herself remembered playing Goldstock last season as an assistant coach for Harvard and Goldstock assisted on the game-winning goal of an overtime game.“Asa is part of the group that shattered the mold,” Griggs said, “where you now put your best athlete in goal.”Goldstock was widely known of by the time she reached 10th grade. When she accompanied Moore and her brother, Griffen, for his visit to New Hampton (New Hampshire) High School, word that Goldstock was on campus reached Jenna Simon, the New Hampton varsity women’s lacrosse coach. She sat down with Goldstock hoping to pique her interest in transferring there. To bolster her case, Simon brought in then-SU pledges Allie Munroe, a current defender for the women’s hockey team, and Tyler Lydon, a former Syracuse basketball forward now in the Denver Nuggets organization, “just to say hi.”Eventually, Goldstock transferred. At New Hampton, Simon saw the goalie’s natural ability that everyone seemed to rave about and that sometimes became her kryptonite. Goldstock’s strength, which had always been a part of her game, sometimes led her to launch a pass three-quarters down the field after making a big save that would be intercepted.“Though at times it was frustrating,” Simon said, “she’s so athletic, she shines that way sometimes, too.”Alexandra Moreo | Senior Staff PhotographerGoldstock’s tendencies led to turnovers more times than once and, in certain situations, Simon said, the coaching staff at New Hampton had to instruct her to “hold back.”Occasional brilliance masked the mistakes and made it difficult to parse when a play was really too risky for Goldstock to attempt.At Syracuse last season, despite starting all 22 games, she only played the full 60 minutes in 12 of them as Gait switched her in and out of goal. Her talents struggled to transition to the faster NCAA game as she let in 11 or more goals 13 times, including a season-worst 19 against Boston College in the Eagles’ drubbing in the first round of the NCAA tournament.When Syracuse exercised patience with her struggles, it asked Goldstock to do the same. On March 5 against Virginia in the Carrier Dome, Goldstock had one of her worst stretches of the season, allowing the Cavaliers to open the game by scoring five-straight goals.Gait motioned Goldstock to the sideline and she trotted over expecting the worst. She didn’t expect to go back in. On the sideline, she heard just what she expected to hear.“Just watch,” she remembered Gait saying.So, she did. She stood there and watched the defense as they settled in and reflected on the mistakes she made earlier. To her surprise, the reflection ended in less than 90 seconds. Gait inserted her back into the game after just spending just 1:21 on the sideline.Her “three-second memory,” which she said helped her forget about the last play after a mistake, had to return.When it was over, the Orange had won even though Goldstock allowed 13 goals in what she said was “one of the worst performances of her career.”Looking back now, though, Goldstock maintained that win was one of her best moments in her time with the Orange.After the excitement passed, she set off to watch film. She re-lived the mistakes she made. She noticed what she could’ve done better. She does this again and again, hoping it’ll eventually click.• • •At a recent practice on the field at Ensley Athletic Center, Goldstock stood on the end line adjacent to the goal. She had just broken away from her warmup drills and surveyed the field where all her teammates stood in two vertical lines down each sideline, playing catch.This was the place she’d always dreamed she’d be because of the person she’d dreamed of being. Treanor had always kept the doors to her home open for Goldstock to make it her own.Her teammates tossed the ball back and forth, talking little and listening to the music thundering in the facility. Then, without context, Goldstock screamed “Go Cuse,” and it rang throughout the large complex.Last season, she said, her inexperience hindered her from developing the leadership abilities vital to a goalie’s success. Treanor had always been an icon that Goldstock was honored to follow, but now it was time for her to become one herself. She needed her own voice, and she needed it to be heard.“Being a goalie,” Goldstock said, “you need to be louder than everyone else.”Syracuse needs it as much as she does.Banner photo by Alexandra Moreo | Senior Staff PhotographerSponsored bylast_img read more

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Wilson explodes with 30 points against Indiana

first_imgSenior Rob Wilson more than doubled his previous career-high of 13 points in Friday\’s game.[/media-credit]INDIANAPOLIS – That a senior guard would lead the Wisconsin men’s basketball team in its Big Ten tournament-opening game against Indiana is not surprising.But the name might raise a few eyebrows.With Jordan Taylor in a funk, Rob Wilson came off the bench to deliver blow after blow to the Hoosiers, scoring 30 points on 11 of 16 shooting, including 7 of 10 from behind the perimeter in the 79-71 win.Wilson’s 30 points more than doubles his previous career-high scoring mark (13 points) and is the highest single-game point total any Badger has produced all season. Prior to Friday, he averaged just 3.1 points per game.His numbers caused such a stir that his name began trending worldwide on Twitter during the second half.“Needless to say, we had a player in the zone,” Wisconsin head coach Bo Ryan said, who became the program’s all-time winningest head coach with the win. “His teammates found him, he worked hard to get open. I think Rob Wilson is the story of the game, as far as our offense goes.”The performance lifted the Badgers, who shot well collectively (48.3 percent from the field and 50 from behind the arc) and had four players score in double digits but were slowed somewhat by an off day from Taylor.Before Friday afternoon, Wilson had never made more than a trio of three-pointers in one game while at UW.“The way the ball felt like it was going in today, I don’t remember that feeling in a long time,” Wilson said, who logged 32 minutes on the floor against the Hoosiers.Taylor finished the afternoon with 12 points on 3-of-12 shooting from the field and four assists. But after the win – the first of his and Wilson’s career at the Big Ten tournament – Taylor couldn’t help but beam.“I’m so happy, I feel like I had 30 because the most important thing [is], we got the win,” he said.As novel as the feeling felt for Wilson, the Ohio native entered Friday’s quarterfinal game in the midst of perhaps his finest stretch as a Badger reserve. Over the final four games of the regular season he scored 32 points, had hit 12 of 25 field goals and had only turned the ball over once.According to Indiana head coach Tom Crean, the Hoosiers, in preparation for Friday’s game, identified Wilson as Wisconsin’s most improved player since the two teams last met in late January.But that doesn’t necessarily mean they expected a 30-point performance.“As we told our team, he was the most improved player on their team since the first time we played them,” Crean said. “He really brought a different dose of energy to their team when he was in the game and to shoot it the way he did today – in the last five games he had hit seven threes and today he hit seven threes.”Wilson stayed consistent from the arc all afternoon, hitting his first two attempts from downtown between the 15 and 13-minute mark in the first half. And his five second half threes all seemed to come in critical moments as the Hoosiers would repeatedly regain momentum and threaten to retake the lead.Indiana came within four points of Wisconsin with just over 11 minutes in the game, but Wilson hit back-to-back three-pointers over a two-minute span to give the Badgers a seven-point lead.Later, with under four minutes remaining, the Hoosiers held possession facing a three-point deficit. Indiana’s Derek Elston drove to the rim to pull within one, but Wilson arrived in front of him just in time to draw a charge. Wisconsin regained possession and on the other end, he slipped in a layup between two Hoosier defenders to go up by five.Then, after an Indiana basket, Wilson lobbed a pass from behind the arc to a wide-open Jared Berggren streaking across the paint, setting up the redshirt junior with an easy two-handed slam to put the score at 69-64 with 1:55 remaining.“[Wilson] went and set the screen, he just yelled, ‘Read it!’” Berggren said. “And so I read it, Rob came over the top, I ran to the rim, had an open pass, Rob found me.”The Hoosiers managed to hit a free throw on the ensuing possession, but when the Badgers brought the ball down the court again, it ended in another Wilson three-pointer, further separating the Badgers from the Hoosiers, 72-65, with 35 seconds left.“You always want to go out with a bang, but it’s that time of when every team in the country steps it up and every player steps it up because it’s tournament time,” Wilson said. “So that’s what I did, stepped up as a senior’s supposed to.”last_img read more

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Football match-fixing ‘bigger than realised’: coach

first_imgBurkina Faso coach Paul Put, who was suspended in Belgium over match-fixing claims, on Tuesday said that rigging games was more widespread than football realized, with top players implicated in the practice.The Belgian told reporters on the eve of his side’s Africa Cup of Nations semi-final that he was not surprised to hear about revelations on Monday that European police had unearthed a criminal network targeting hundreds of matches.“Match-fixing has always existed in football,” said Put, who was suspended for three years after being implicated in a rigging scandal while coach of Belgian first division side Lierse.“For sure football has a bigger problem than it realises. Let’s be honest, if it happens at Champions League level it’s widespread but it’s not a new thing. A lot of big international players are involved in match fixing.“But I think FIFA are trying hard to tackle it, it will be difficult but I think you can get rid of it. Look at what cycling is doing with more and more effective doping controls so, yes, I think it is possible to stop it in football.”Put’s rare disclosure about his own brush with corruption which led him to leave Belgium for Africa, said he had been caught up in an epidemic that had spread across the national game. “The whole of Belgian football was sick at that time,” he said.“I was threatened by the mafia, my children were threatened, the mafia threatened me with weapons and things like that so it’s not nice to talk about these things but this is the reality.“I was forced into it. But fixing is a big word. At that time Belgian football was in a bad way. There was no hope, no money. It’s not that I was involved in match-fixing, not at all, but it’s been portrayed like that in the media.“And remember, I was just the coach. I had to listen to people above me and the players as well. I was made the scapegoat but other teams were doing the same, not only Lierse.”Put likened his case to that of Lance Armstrong, the disgraced US cyclist who was stripped of his seven Tour de france titles and handed a life ban for doping, saying he had been made an example of.“I was never banned by FIFA. I was banned for three years in Belgium, without any reason,” he said. “But as FIFA said I could work elsewhere we didn’t make any trouble in Belgium.” His suspension led him to Africa, where he coached Gambia for two-and-a-half years before taking over the helm at Burkina Faso, and leading them to Wednesday’s semi-final against Ghana.“It’s funny. Everyone is turning to me now and calling me from Belgium for radio and television interviews,” he added.Given his chequered past and remarkable success with the Burkinabe Put feels he has something to prove back in Europe.“My ambition now is to be in charge of a big team in a big country. I want to prove something again.”Put’s problems in Belgium are not over yet however as he is one of a group of 40 due to come up for trial in relation to the 2004-2005 corruption affair.last_img read more

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