SMC blood drive sees large turnout

first_imgAs a way of helping meet the American Red Cross’s need for blood donations, Saint Mary’s College hosted a blood drive Monday.“Believe it or not, there is always a need for blood,” Olivia Critchlow, assistant director of the Office for Civic and Social Engagement, said. “We feel that it’s part of one’s civic duty to donate if possible.”The drive was held in the College’s Student Center Lounge from noon to 6 p.m., and was one of four blood drives the College offers each academic year.At Monday’s drive, more than 90 people had signed up to donate blood, Critchlow said. She also said students were able to continue to sign up throughout the drive, and walk-ins were also accepted.“It is important to donate blood because there is always a need for it in the community,” Critchlow said. “Blood cannot be manufactured, so the only way to fulfill the need for it is through volunteer donations.”Critchlow said the actual blood donation takes less than 10 to 12 minutes on average. Additionally, the entire blood donation process takes less than one hour.Sophomore Katie Cireski donated blood Monday to help fill a need.“There’s a need for blood and there are so many people that are eligible that don’t donate, so I figured since I am eligible to donate, I might as well,” sophomore Katie Ciresi said. “I think it’s something important to do and I think everyone should do it at least once in their life, if not more.” Junior Grace Sadowski also said she believes it is important to donate blood — so important that she has been a donor about 15 times.“I’ve always given it,” she said. “My little sister was premature and people that gave blood saved her life so I always do.”Sadowski said she thinks there is a higher need than ever before for blood donations and encouraged others to donate.“I personally can’t save people’s lives, so I feel like this is helping as much as I can,” she said. “I think more people should do it and it’s not as scary as everyone thinks. Families that do have blood donated to them are really appreciative.”According to a press release form the American Red Cross, the blood drive held Monday was parte of the “Stave a Vampire. Donate Blood” campaign.As part of the campaign, two $50 shopping sprees were given away in a drawing. Those who donated blood were entered.In addition to the blood drive held Monday, other drives for the campaign will be held in the area. On April 26 and April 27, blood drives will be held in 315 LaFortune Student Center at Notre Dame.Three $50 shopping sprees will be given away each day during the blood drives held at the University.last_img read more

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Alcoholic energy drinks discussed

first_imgAt Monday’s Campus Life Council (CLC) meeting, members discussed a memo presented by Brian Coughlin, assistant vice president for student activities and head of the recently-assembled Alcohol Energy Drink (AED) Working Group. The memo discussed the progress of the group in responding to issues related to student use of caffeinated alcoholic beverages. The memo stated that, while the FDA and other governmental agencies have already taken steps to limit or ban the popular Four Loko and Joose drinks, AEDs are still a concern because “some students may still have ‘original’ formula AEDs and/or some students may attempt to make their own should the pre-packaged products no longer be available.” The memo went on to say the group has not yet decided upon a recommendation to give Fr. Tom Doyle, vice president for student affairs. It has considered three options: banning AEDs across campus, leaving the issue to the discretion of individual rectors, and establishing no formal policy. The group did, however, indicate it would make continued efforts to increase awareness about the effects of AEDs to students, an idea that Knott Hall senator Alex Kasparie thought would be more effective than a ban. “I think the biggest thing is the education. I hate to say it, but usually I take a ban as a challenge,” he said. “No ban is going to change the attitude.” CLC member Ben Noe, a sophomore, suggested emphasizing the fact that AEDs are extremely high in calories as a way to deter students from consuming them. “We thought it would be pertinent to Notre Dame students who seem to be particularly health conscious,” he said. “Not only that these drinks are dangerous, but also that they are unhealthy for you calorie-wise.” Christopher Haug, assistant director for residence life and housing, thought raising this point with students could lead to other unhealthy behavior. “Unfortunately, one of the things we found out across the country is that people do know that, so sometimes they won’t eat dinner and will drink the Four Loko,” he said. “Then they’ll have nothing to metabolize the alcohol with.” Noe went on to say that the availability and consumption of non-alcoholic energy drinks on campus is a concern within itself. Julia Sutton, SUB director, said the University could only go so far in managing students’ decisions. “Can’t anything be harmful if overused?” she said. “I think the University can’t go that far. You can’t take energy drinks out of The Huddle unless you take Burger King out.” Student body vice president Andrew Bell highlighted the aspects of alcohol education that his culture shift task force, which is examining drinking at Notre Dame, plans to address specifically. “One of the things is the continuous education, that it’s not just overload during your first months at school,” he said. Bell said educating students about Indiana-specific alcohol laws, increasing student-led alcohol education, and informing students how to help a friend in a dangerous situation will be emphasized in the future.last_img read more

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Expert examines nations’ democratization

first_imgPoliticians often speak to democratization in the Middle East, but rarely about how the process works. On Tuesday, Dr. Ali Mazrui picked up where they left off, with his lecture “Democratizing Muslim Societies from Above and Below: Between Atatürk and Tahrir Square” in the Hesburgh Center for International Studies. Before the lecture, Scott Appleby, director of the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies introduced Mazrui as “one of the leading thinkers about Islam politics and culture in the world.” Mazrui, Director of the Institute of Global Cultural Studies at Binghamton University and Senior Fellow at the Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Center for Muslim-Christian Understanding at Georgetown University, said his talk focused on Ataturk and Tahrir Square because these revolutions represented the most striking examples of democratization from above and below, respectively, in the history of the Middle East. “The most spectacular [example] of democracy above is still the case of revolution of Atatürk in 1920s and 1930s,” Mazrui said. “The most spectacular [example] of democracy below is in Tunisia and Tahrir Square in Cairo – which ousted Hosni Mubarak in February of 2011.”  Mazrui said the revolution of Ataturk, which brought democracy to Turkey in the 1920s and 1930s, is still remembered in Turkey and other Muslim nations. He said when visiting the Middle East he has seen images of the Atatürk Revolution all over the place. Mazrui also said the Ataturk revolution in many ways “westernized” Turkey. “Turkey’s democratization from above was simultaneously Turkey’s westernization from above,” he said. This has led Muslims in other nations to wonder whether or not such westernization is an inevitable part of becoming more democratic, Mazrui said. Throughout the Muslim world people are asking themselves the same question, he said. “Can we liberally democratize without culturally westernizing?,” he said. Mazrui also said there was a strong link between education and modernity, as well as between empowering women and modernity, in Turkish society.  Mazrui then transitioned to a discussion of democratization from below. His example for this form of democratization was the recent revolution in Egypt sparked by the Tahrir Square protests. He said the Tahrir Square revolution as an example of democratization from below highlights one drawback of this approach. “Democratization from below was effective in ending the old [regime] rather than starting a new [regime],” he said. “The Tahrir Square Revolution ousted the old empire, but it’s hard to tell the influence it will have later.” The importance of women in the liberalization of the Arab world was also highlighted in Egypt’s revolution, Mazrui said. “Women were very visible participants in the Tahrir protests,” he said. “Historically, Egypt led the way with women’s liberation.” Mazrui said the main problem going forward in Egypt is the removal of President Hosni Mubarak, which has left Egyptians thinking they can remove each succeeding president. “Egyptian populations feel if you have appointed a President and he has not delivered the goods that you want, then you should throw him out,” Mazrui said. “It is a ridiculous situation in Egypt because it has resulted in major reverses in the social liberalizations and the deaths of at least a thousand people since the uprisings took off.”  Mazrui said the number of pro-democratic uprisings in the Arab world in recent years is unprecedented in the course of history. He also said this democratization in the Arab world can continue, especially if the secrets of revolutions like those of Ataturk and Tahrir Square are uncovered and employed. “[The] empowerment of women to the top of the political scale is one such secret,” Mazrui said.last_img read more

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COVID-19 Cases Increase To Seven In Chautauqua County

first_imgMAYVILLE – Officials in Chautauqua County say the number of confirmed COVID-19 cases have increased to seven.During Saturday’s update by the Chautauqua County COVID-19 Response Team, officials said the two new cases include a woman in her 70s, with no recent travel, and a woman in her 30s, with no recent travel outside the country, but had travel to Erie County, New York.“Based on the initial review of each case by Health Department epidemiology staff, these individuals appear to have had separate exposures to the novel coronavirus,” officials said. “Both of these individuals will continue to recover at home under mandatory isolation as ordered by the Local Health Official per NYS Public Health Law.”Chautauqua County Public Health staff is now conducting an investigation to identify close contacts of the new cases. “Once identified, our department notifies the close contacts of their potential exposure to COVID-19 and they are placed under mandatory or precautionary quarantine to monitor for symptoms,” officials said. “If you do not personally hear from a public health nurse, you are not a close contact of an individual who has been confirmed to have COVID-19.”State guidelines say close contact refers to a person who cared for or lived with a person with COVID-19. It does not include activities such as walking by a person or sitting across a waiting room or office for a brief time.Additionally, the number of those under some type of quarantine is as follows:21 people are now in Mandatory Quarantine (individuals confirmed positive of COVID-19 or a household contact of a confirmed positive COVID-19 case); 38 individuals in Precautionary Quarantine (individuals with travel history to CDC level 3 country or proximal contact of a confirmed case of COVID-19);25 individuals in Mandatory Isolation (individuals who are symptomatic of COVID-19 and are pending COVID-19 lab test).So far the county has received 84 negative test results to date.The County COVID-19 Response Team continues to meet daily during this pandemic and urges residents to please stay home and stay safe.  “Limit your trips to the grocery store to once a week if possible, remember to use social distancing, and avoid gathering in groups,” officials furthered. MGN Image Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window),Why are we not being told what town/area these new cases are from?,How about the number of people that have been tested like other counties are doinglast_img read more

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Tickets Now Available for New Country Off-Broadway

first_img View Comments Related Shows Tickets are now on sale for New Country, written by and starring Mark Roberts. The off-Broadway production begins performances on May 16 at the Cherry Lane Theatre, where it is scheduled to run through June 20. Opening night is set for May 20. David Harwell directs.In New Country, country music star Justin Spears has the world on their knees. He’s a good ole bad boy that’s tying the knot tomorrow; but tonight, he’s tying one on. He’s going to party hardy with his entourage of ruthless, calculating managers, faux fans and friends, his favorite pig-farming uncle and a plastic model.Joining Roberts as Uncle Jim in the cast is Jared Culverhouse as Chuck, Sarah Lemp as Sharon, David Lind as Justin, Malcolm Madera as Paul and Stephen Sheffer as Ollie. New Country Show Closed This production ended its run on June 27, 2015last_img read more

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Master Gardeners

first_img“We know that sustainable garden and landscape practices are in the best interest of all of our communities, and it’s our job to share that with others and to pass it along to the next generation,” he said. University of GeorgiaThis fall marks the 30th anniversary of the Master Gardener program in Georgia, and Master Gardeners gathered recently to celebrate the occasion by volunteering their skills at the Gwinnett Environmental & Heritage Center, located near Buford. “Once we decided to go ahead and make the celebration a workday, we put out a call for locations,” said Krissy Slagle, a program assistant for the University of Georgia Master Gardener program.Kathy Parent, Master Gardener and UGA Cooperative Extension program assistant in Gwinnett County, suggested the Gwinnett center because it’s a green space and a teaching facility about water.”We were looking for a location that would represent collaboration between Cooperative Extension and other educational organizations in the county, and the GEHC was just what we were looking for. Water has been a critical issue for the metro areas and the whole state, and it probably will be even more so in the future. They have done a great job creating an interactive educational exhibit for all of the generations,” said Marco Fonseca, the program’s state coordinator.With tools in hand, 60 Master Gardens volunteered their services to build raised beds at the center. Kids who participate in gardening programs at the center also helped. In addition to the raised beds, several other projects were completed. Shannon Pable, a Gwinnett County Master Gardener, led an effort to extend a bed that she created soon after the center opened. The award-winning Georgia Gems garden showcases UGA plant introductions. Donated plants were added to the area to showcase low-maintenance ones suited for Georgia landscapes. Throughout the year, Master Gardeners volunteer at the center, which is a model for sustainable horticultural practices.”They willingly give their time and energy to support the Gwinnett Environmental & Heritage Center, sharing their knowledge with the public at our educational programs through Earth Day events and the Junior Master Gardener program and donating their time to improve our landscape,” said Catherine Long, exhibit program coordinator at the GEHC. As Master Gardeners look back over the past three decades, Fonseca says that understanding, protection and enhancement of urban natural ecology are the future of program.last_img read more

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Six Suffolk Town Supervisors Re-elected

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Ed RomaineTown of Brookhaven Supervisor Ed Romaine claimed victory Tuesday night with unofficial results giving the Republican a 25-percent advantage with nearly all districts reporting.Romaine, who was elected to the seat last year in a special election, walked on stage to raucous cheers from his Republican supporters inside The Emporium in Patchogue.Romaine thanked voters for “giving me a landslide victory for supervisor,” adding, “I am deeply humbled by it.”“We are going to change this town,” Romaine yelled to the crowd.Republican incumbents in Town of Smithtown, Patrick Vecchio and Sean Walter of the Town of Riverhead, were also re-elected, according to unofficial results.Democratic supervisors, Rick Schaffer of the Town of Babylon and Anna Throne-Holst of the Town of Smithtown, were also re-elected.Romaine was beating his Democratic challenger Vivian Viloria-Fisher 62 percent to 37 percent with all but four districts reporting.The Republican supervisor overcame strong criticism for his handling of a blizzard in early February that dumped more than 30 inches on parts of Suffolk County. Romaine was on vacation when the blizzard hit.Suffolk County Republican Committee Chairman John Jay LaValle predicted a big victory for Romaine before results started pouring in.“I expect Ed Romaine to get more than 60 percent of the vote tonight,” he told the Press. “He’s going to blow out his opponent.”“Obviously that was a tough start out of the gate,” LaValle said of the storm controversy. “But he’s a hard worker. Ed’s a guy that goes at it seven days a week.”Two other Suffolk democratic incumbents who ran unnoposed, Town of East Hampton Supervisor Larry Cantwell and Town of Shelter Island Supervisor James Dougherty, were both re-elected.last_img read more

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Lynbrook Woman Fatally Hit by Truck

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York An 80-year-old woman was fatally hit by a truck in the victim’s hometown of Lynbrook on Monday morning.Nassau County police said Stephanie O’Neill was walking behind a Ford box truck that was backing up on Daley Place when she was struck shortly before noon.The victim was taken to a local hospital, where she was pronounced dead.Detectives performed a brake test at the scene and found no criminality involved in the accident.last_img read more

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Aleron Enters New Markets with Acquisition of IMPAQ

first_imgAleron Group has acquired electrical drive engineering specialist IMPAQ, to support its expansion strategy into new technology and markets including military, defence and nuclear industries. Following the deal, the group has been awarded its first contract in the academic sector.The contract will see the newly-named entity IMPAQ-Technologies supporting the British Geological Survey (BGS) with an upgrade to their RD2 remote seabed corer and rock drill.The upgraded system will use a subsea hydraulic power unit and a topside power distribution unit supplied by Aleron Subsea to increase the drilling capability of the RD2 system.This latest acquisition adds a new range of products and engineering capabilities to the group including a fleet of positive pressure compensators, subsea hydraulic power units and electric motors.IMPAQ-Technologies director, John Rodgers, will continue to lead the company’s electrical engineering and technology development from its existing base in Gainsborough, Lincolnshire. All testing will be conducted at the Aleron headquarters in Aberdeen (Scotland).Aleron Group commercial director, Gary McConnell said: “This acquisition signals our intent to expand upon our reputation for supplying reliable, robust subsea support equipment, and grow the business in new global markets. IMPAQ-Technologies has already opened us up to a new area – the academia sector – and we will be targeting the defence, military and nuclear industries in a similar way as we continue to develop our electrical drive technology.“John Rodgers will continue to play an important role in the company, spearheading the development of new electrical drive technology solutions which will help meet our clients’ needs and support the group’s ongoing growth strategy.“We also have ambitious plans to grow the number of IMPAQ-Technologies personnel by the end of the year.”last_img read more

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Woman marries herself to celebrate her ‘self-discovery’ as a single woman

first_imgNZ Herald 7 October 2014If you’re keen to get married but just can’t find the right person, one young woman could have provided the solution.Having been single for almost six years, Grace Gelder decided to marry herself.The photographer and filmmaker told The Guardian that the ceremony was a way of recognising and cementing the powerful relationship she had established with herself while not involved in a relationship.“I’d been essentially single for almost six years and built up this brilliant relationship with myself. Nevertheless, I was aware of getting into a rut, where a relationship with someone else seemed like too much hard work,” Gelder said.“So I really wanted to pay tribute to this adventurous period of self-discovery but, at the same time, look forward to a new phase.”Gelder said she had been inspired by a Björk song called Isobel: “[I] have a strong recollection of when I was 18 at university and studying performance art, hearing that line in a Björk song called Isobel: ‘My name’s Isobel, married to myself,’ and thinking, crazy as that sounds, I totally get that.http://m.nzherald.co.nz/lifestyle/news/article.cfm?c_id=6&objectid=11338371last_img read more

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