PAOK Squeaks By Panetolikos, 1-0

first_imgPAOK of Thessaloniki joined Olympiakos at the top of the Greek soccer Super League on Sept. 22 with a 1-0 win over Panetolikos.PAOK had scored 13 goals in its last three games, including six against Dinamo Minsk of Belarus in a European league game, but struggled against its Greek opponent.The win for PAOK came on a penalty kick by Robert Mak on the 36th minute, and the visitors only had one more good chance in the game, hitting the woodwork on the 64th, but were not threatened with the exception of an injury-time scare.Atromitos reacted to its 1-0 loss at OFI Crete with the sacking of manager Giorgos Paraschos on Sept. 22. Former OFI boss Sa Pinto, from Portugal, is the leading contender to take over at Peristeri.TweetPinShare0 Shareslast_img read more

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Navya Nanda works out on a New York sidewalk. Fitness motivation? You bet

first_imgYou don’t need a proper gym set up to work out, right? In case you don’t agree with us, take a cue from Navya Nanda. On Monday, a video was shared by Navya’s fan clubs as she was seen working out on a sidewalk in New York. Pretty in a neon green sports bra and grey tights, Navya was absolutely pro at her job.See for yourself:The video has been viewed over 15,000 times and Navya’s fans are super impressed, of course. “Outdoor workout…great keep it up,” read a comment while another user wrote, “I love this great going Navya.” Another fan also expressed her desire to watch Navya at the movies: “I want to see you in the movies.”But we agree with this comment the most: “U ARE ON FIRE.” Most of Navya’s fans also posted heart emoticons on the thread as her admirers just loved the video as much as we did.Navya is Shweta Bachchan’s first child with husband, businessman Nikhil Nanda. Shweta Bachchan is Amitabh and Jaya Bachchan’s daughter.Navya Nanda is reportedly studying at New York’s Fordham University.ALSO READ: Navya Nanda and Agastya spend a blissful Saturday with grandmother Ritu Nanda. See picALSO WATCH | Star kids are B-Town’s next big thing, Priyanka meets PM Modilast_img read more

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Austal Launches USNS ‘Fall River’ (USA)

first_imgzoom Austal USA successfully completed the launch process of the USNS Fall River on January 16, 2014. Recently christened, this 103-meter high-speed catamaran represents the U.S. Department of Defense’s next generation multi-use platform. It is part of a 10-ship program, the funds for all of which have been appropriated, worth over US$1.6 billion.Christening of JHSV 4The launch of USNS Fall River was conducted in a multi-step process that involved having Berard Transportation transfer the ship from Assembly Bay 3 onto a deck barge, which was then towed to BAE Systems Southeast Shipyard. The next day, Fall River was transferred onto BAE’s dry dock Alabama; it was floated then returned to Austal’s facility where it will undergo final outfitting and activation before sea trials and delivery to the Navy later this year.Craig Perciavalle, Austal USA President, commented, “It’s really amazing at how easy the team makes this complicated process look. I appreciate the efforts of all involved.”JHSV 4 is now one of four Austal-built Navy ships moored in the Mobile River, joining USNS Millinocket (JHSV 3), Coronado (LCS 4), and Jackson (LCS 6).Perciavalle added, “With JHSV 3 recently completing Acceptance Trials and preparing for delivery, and now the launch of Fall River, the JHSV program continues to progress well as we meet our commitments to the Navy. The incredible shipbuilders here at Austal should be very proud of this accomplishment”.USNS Spearhead (JHSV 1) was delivered in December 2012 and is soon to be deployed. USNS Choctaw County (JHSV 2) was delivered to the Navy in June 2013. USNS Millinocket (JHSV 3) has completed Acceptance Trials and is scheduled to be delivered within the next month. Construction is well underway on Trenton (JHSV 5) which will begin final assembly in, now vacant, Assembly Bay 3 by the end of January, and construction will begin on Brunswick (JHSV 6) by the end of this month.The JHSV is a relatively new asset that will be an important Navy connector. In peacetime, JHSVs will be operating forward supporting Navy Expeditionary Combat Command and riverine forces, theater cooperating missions, Seabees, Marine Corps and Army transportation. Each JHSV also supports helicopter operations and has a slewing vehicle ramp on the starboard quarter which enables use of austere piers and quay walls, common in developing countries. A shallow draft (under 4 meters) will further enhance theater port access.Austal USA is also prime contractor for the construction of ten Independence-variant Littoral Combat Ships (LCS), a contract totaling $3.5 billion. Four of these ships are under construction at this time, the first of which was launched just last month.For the LCS and JHSV programs, Austal, as prime contractor, is teamed with General Dynamics Advanced Information Systems, a business unit of General Dynamics. For the JHSV program, General Dynamics is responsible for the design, integration and testing of the navigation and communication systems, C4I and aviation systems. As the Independence-variant LCS ship systems integrator, General Dynamics is responsible for the design, integration and testing of the ship’s electronic systems.Austal, January 17, 2014last_img read more

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Winning Shipping to Expand Fleet with Capesize Bulker

first_imgzoom China’s shipping firm Winning Shipping has reached an agreement to buy a 180,200 dwt Capesize vessel, the Yuritamou, according to data provided by VesselsValue.The company is buying the second-hand vessel from Japan-based Doun Kisen for a price of USD 23 million.The Capesize was constructed at Japanese Imabari Shipbuilding and handed over to its owner in January 2007.VesselsValue data shows that the 289-meter-long ship has a market value of USD 21.2 million.The Panama-flagged bulker will become a part of Winning Shipping’s current fleet of over 30 bulk carriers with a total size of more than 5.3 million dwt.World Maritime News Stafflast_img read more

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Halifax Metro Centre Launches Good Sport Program

first_imgVisitors to the Halifax Metro Centre can now take a pledge to be a designated driver for the night. Trade Centre Limited president and CEO Scott Ferguson announced today, June 21, the Halifax Metro Centre is launching the Budweiser Good Sport program. The program encourages designated drivers to sign a pledge while attending a Metro Centre event stating they will not drink alcohol during the event and will provide a safe drive home for their companions. “The Halifax Metro Centre hosts thousands of patrons a year and we recognize the important role we play in ensuring visitors to our facility have a safe, enjoyable experience,” said Mr. Ferguson. “As the operator of the Metro Centre, we are proud to partner on this valuable program that will positively impact our community.” The program is a partnership between Trade Centre Limited, Labatt and Nova Scotia Liquor Corporation. The Halifax Metro Centre is the second venue in North America, without a major professional sports team or franchise, to have a Good Sport Program. “We all have a role to play in ensuring responsible choices are available when alcohol is being served,” said Mayor Mike Savage. “I commend the Metro Centre and its partners in the Good Sport initiative for encouraging patrons to make the positive choice to be a designated driver.” Designated drivers who sign the Good Sport pledge will receive a free soft drink and will be entered into a draw to win Good Sport prizes. “We know many people who attend events at the Halifax Metro Centre get there by driving,” said Wade Keller, director of corporate affairs for Labatt in Atlantic Canada. “We are pleased to partner with TCL and NSLC to help ensure those people get home safely.” The Halifax Metro Centre is celebrating 35 years of attracting and hosting concerts, sporting and special events. Over the course of its history, it has drawn more than 15 million visitors and hosted over 5,000 events. Trade Centre Limited is the provincial Crown corporation that manages the Halifax Metro Centre on behalf of Halifax Regional Municipality. Its other core business areas include World Trade and Convention Centre, Exhibition Park and Ticket Atlantic. Its mandate is to create economic and community benefits by bringing people together in Halifax and Nova Scotia. For more information, visit www.halifaxmetrocentre.com .last_img read more

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Princess Lalla Salma Chairs Signing Ceremony of Draft Agreement to Offer

Rabat – Princess Lalla Salma, chairwoman of the Lalla Salma Foundation for Cancer Prevention and Treatment, chaired, on Thursday in Rabat at the Sheikha Fatma Center in the National Oncology Institute, the signing ceremony of a draft agreement between the Foundation and Morocco’s Roche Laboratories (Roche Maroc) to help poor patients get innovative medicines.“Initiated in 2009, the access program enables disadvantaged patients to get anti-cancer therapies meeting international standards. This program helped over 1,500 patients yearly to benefit from Roche innovative therapies,” said a statement by the Lalla Salma Foundation.The renewal of the draft agreement was inked by secretary general of the said Foundation Latifa El Abida, Dr. Peter Hug, Roche director for eastern Europe, Middle East and Africa, Dr. Bart Vanhauwere, director general for Morocco and north Africa and Sanaa Sayagh, pharmaceutical director for Morocco. “We are glad of this sustainable partnership which will enable Roche Maroc to contribute to the development of oncology and facilitate the access of Moroccan patients to our innovative products against breast cancer and other types of cancer,” said Peter Hug.“We hope to continue bringing our support, under the national anti-cancer plan, in the fields of clinical research, training of health professional, diagnosis and awareness-raising,” he added.Following the signing ceremony, Princess Lalla Salma visited, along with Peter Hug, Bart Vanhauwere and Sanaa Sayagh, the pharmacy of the Sheikha Fatma Center and the central unit for chemotherapy drugs. HRH Princess Lalla Salma also visited cancer inpatients.With MAP read more

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Canadian Auto Workers CEP join forces to create Canadian megaunion

A second union approved plans to create Canada’s biggest private sector union in a vote on Monday, promising to revitalize the labor movement with a merger between the Communications, Energy and Paperworkers (CEP) and the Canadian Auto Workers (CAW).Delegates at a CEP convention in Quebec City approved a 45-page blueprint for a new union that will boast more than 300,000 members, leaving representatives of the two unions with the task of naming the new union and determining how it will work.CAW members approved the outline plan in August.We have a lot of work ahead of us to bring our two organizations together and to consummate this marriage of two hell raisers made in heaven“We have a lot of work ahead of us to bring our two organizations together and to consummate this marriage of two hell raisers made in heaven,” CAW secretary-treasurer Peter Kennedy told a news conference announcing the vote.[np-related]Leaders of both unions have pitched the merger as a way to shore up the labor movement in the face of growing pressure for concessions and the increasing willingness of governments to intervene in labor disputes, often to the benefit of management.Organizers promise to increase the size of the union, which will accept unemployed and retired workers and expects to merge with other smaller unions in Canada in the future.“We have to be relevant and this brings us right down to the grass roots of every community,” CEP national president Dave Coles told the news conference.“There are unions right across this country that are following this…I can also say that the world’s watching…”MORE WORK AHEADBut the current proposal leaves a number of potentially divisive issues open, including who will lead the new organization, what it will be called, and which political party it will support.The CEP is closely tied to Canada’s opposition New Democrats, while the CAW takes a more pragmatic approach, supporting Liberal candidates where appropriate.The vote gives a team of union officials the go-ahead to hammer out details like these, ahead of a joint founding convention next year where members will formally approve a final plan.Coles and CAW national president Ken Lewenza would not say whether they will seek leadership of the new mega-union.The new union will span growing resource sectors such as Alberta’s oil sands, where the CEP is active, as well as central Canada’s ailing manufacturing economy.It will devote about 10% of its estimated $100-million annual revenue to organizing, twice the combined spend of the two unions.The CAW, formed in 1985 when Canadian car workers broke away from the U.S.-based United Auto Workers, wrapped up contract talks with Ford Motor Co, General Motors Co and Fiat SpA’s Chrysler Group LLC in September.But mergers and layoffs have changed the face of the union, and only about 20% of its members are now auto workers. Its top leadership, however, is still largely drawn from members who work for the Detroit automakers.The recession has hit industrial unions hard, and CAW membership – now 195,000 – is down 26% since 2005, according to documents released at its August convention.CEP’s membership has fallen more than 20% over five years, to about 110,000, according to government data.Canadian private and public sector unions have also come under pressure as the government several times pushed through back-to-work legislation, arguing that work stoppages could be damaging to an economy that only recently came out of recession.But Canadian private sector workers are still more than twice as likely to belong to a union than their U.S. counterparts, official statistics show.CAW members work at a number of major Canadian companies, including Air Canada Inc, Canadian Pacific Railway Ltd and Canadian National Railway Co.CEP, itself the product of a series of mergers, organizes in the news media, natural resources companies, and in Western Canada’s expanding oil sands, It also represents workers at telecom giant BCE Inc among many other companies.© Thomson Reuters 2012 read more

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INTERVIEW Tackling cholera in Haiti through improvements in water and sanitation

“Because cholera is, to a large extent, a disease of poverty, it remains a problem while there is poverty in Haiti,” Mourad Wahba of Egypt, Deputy Special Representative for the UN Stabilization Mission in Haiti (MINUSTAH) told the UN News Centre.Cholera is, to a large extent, a disease of poverty.Since the outbreak of cholera in Haiti in 2010, the UN has worked to contain the disease by focusing on emergency response to save lives, vaccinating the population and implementing preventive measures. Cholera deaths, which over the past six years totalled about 9,000, have dramatically decreased to 168 fatalities this year, added Mr. Wahba.However, he stressed, the Government, the UN and the donor community must mobilize more resources as the current funding is not sufficient.UN News Centre: Nearly six years after the first outbreak of cholera in Haiti, to what extent, is cholera still a problem there? Has the number of cholera cases change over the past years? Mr. Wahba: Six years after the outbreak of cholera in Haiti, it remains a problem, but much, much less of one than we had at the outset. Incidence of cholera has gone down by 90 per cent. In 2011, we had 350,000 cases, and last year, under 36,000 cases. The lethality of cholera over the past six years totalled about 9,000 cases. There are 168 this year. It has gone down very radically. Because cholera is, to a large extent, a disease of poverty, it remains a problem while there is poverty in Haiti. It is a problem because we don’t have sufficient water and sanitation to cover the whole territory, and it is a problem because we constantly need to fundraise in order to deal with emergency response to cholera and with the vaccination of the population. UN News Centre: What are the root causes of cholera?Mr. Wahba: As you know, cholera is Vibrio [bacteria] that is present mainly in water, and the root cause of cholera is in the unavailability of safe drinking water and of adequate sanitation. In Haiti, a large proportion of the population does not have access to sanitation – only 28 per cent has access to sanitation – and about of half of the population have access to safe drinking water. Nobody can resolve the problem of cholera in Haiti and elsewhere until you tackle the question of sanitation. UN News Centre: What is rapid intervention?Mr. Wahba: Rapid intervention is an initiative developed with the Ministry of Health. The principle of that is once you have cases that are suspected to be cholera, for instance watery diarrhoea, we have an immediate team to be dispatched to that area that does two things. First, it tests to see whether this is in fact cholera. Secondly, it provides oral rehydration serums to the affected people to save lives. We managed to save many lives in this manner. Through rapid response, we sanitize the areas where cholera has struck and houses surrounding it with chlorination to prevent the further spread of the disease in the community.UN News Centre: What the target of the vaccination campaign this year? Much more should be done, by all of us – by the UN and by the donor community – to improve the funding. Mr. Wahba: This year, we are hoping to vaccinate 400,000 persons in the most-affected communes. I believe this has been a successful exercise. We are trying to do much more by the end of the year, but it requires a large number of doses to do so. Vaccination is expensive, and you need to acquire doses and the world stock is not sufficient. We also need to have expenses for people undertaking the vaccination – it is two doses taken orally – you have to follow-up on those who have received vaccines, and you have to accompany the vaccines, for the maximum efficiency with chlorination of the households. This is what we have been doing this year. UN News Centre: What are the top priorities for fighting cholera in 2016?Mr. Wahba: A top priority for us is two-fold. First, we would like to continue rapid response. We believe that rapid response is the key to controlling the disease and to maintaining it at a relatively low level. And for that, we will need to obtain further funding. Second is to continue with the vaccination campaign. UN News Centre: Is UN response funded sufficiently for 2016?Mr. Wahba: Although $8.7 million has already been mobilized for rapid response in 2016, there remains a gap of $11.6 million. Without additional funding, response measures will be reduced in September or early October.UN News Centre: The Haitian Government has asked for $2.2 billion to implement its 10-year plan to fight cholera. But to date, the plan has been less than 20 per cent funded.Mr. Wahba: Much more should be done, by all of us – by the UN and by the donor community – to improve the funding. Let me say funding is very visible. It goes to two main areas, in the provision of rapid response, which I believe important to contain the spread of cholera, but more importantly and for the long-term, in provision of water and sanitation, which is not only important to contain cholera, but will have health benefits for the whole population. @media only screen and (min-width: 760px), screen9 {#PhotoHolder3 #PhotoCrop { max-height: 770px; /* sets max-height value for all standards-compliant browsers */ width: 134%; margin-left:-161px; margin-top: -454px;}#story-headline{ font-size: 4.7em; line-height: 1.1em; color:#fff; position: relative; top: 100px; margin-left:-1em; text-shadow: 10px 10px 10px rgba(0,0,0,0.8); width:53%;}}#sidebar {display:none;} div#story-content .span8 {width:100% !important} #fullstory p { font-size: 14px; line-height: 1.8em;}strong { font-size: 1.2em; line-height: 1.7em; xfont-family:Georgia, “Times New Roman”, Times, serif;}li { font-size: 15px; xline-height: 1.7em;}blockquote { font-size: 1.2em; line-height: 1.5em; font-style:italic;} UN News Centre: What is the UN doing to fight cholera?Mr. Wahba: The UN is taking a multipronged approach to dealing with cholera in Haiti. The first element of what we are doing is to prevent the spread of cholera. To do so, we are supporting Haiti with sanitation, provision of safe drinking water, [and] chlorination facilities for people to have access to that water. We also are working to provide latrines especially in the countryside. We have managed to declare 16 communes open-defecation-free. We are very proud of that. We are also supporting the spread of sanitation, in collaboration with our colleagues in the direction of portable water and sanitation in Haiti, also with other members of the donor community. That is on the side of prevention. But we are doing much, much more, because we are helping to vaccinate a proportion of the population. We go to the most-affected communes and we vaccinate them. For vaccines to work, we also need WASH (water, sanitation and hygiene) interventions in the area. You need to provide chlorination of the surrounding areas. And finally, we have a policy of rapid response, working with the Ministry of Health. We respond immediately to all outbreaks of cholera with the provision of serum, with provision oral rehydration therapy, and again the sanitation of both houses affected by cholera and also the surrounding areas.UN News Centre: Are these measures increasing access to potable water at schools and medical facilities? Mr. Wahba: Very much so. We are focusing on providing potable water to communities. We are also working within MUNISTAH as part of the Secretary-General’s initiative on total sanitation to help schools, communities and remote villages access clear water sources for drinking and washing.UN News Centre: What has the UN done since 2010 and what is UN doing today?Mr. Whaba: Since 2010, UN has done several things. First, [the UN] has mobilized funding for the provision of safe drinking water and adequate sanitation throughout the country. It’s a very large endeavour that costs hundreds of millions of dollars. But we are mobilizing resources. We mobilized $59 million directly ourselves.Also, we helped the Haitian Government to mobilize over $300 million for water and sanitation. We are working through my colleagues in the [UN Children’s Fund and the Pan-American Health Organization/World Health Organization], and worked with the Ministry of Health in the provision of emergency response services to outbreaks of cholera. That is going well, and has contributed to the 90 per cent decline in cholera cases since 2010. And finally, we are working with the international community in the provision of vaccines to gradually vaccinate the populations against the recurrence of cholera. Government of Haiti has launched a vaccination campaign against cholera that aims to reach 400,000 people in 2016. Photo: UN/MINUSTAH/Logan Abassi A woman along with her son, fills her containers at a water distribution point in Las Palmas, Haiti. Logan Abassi/UN/MINUSTAH read more

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Tuesday Take New 2017 OSU offense under Kevin Wilson could lead to

Former Indiana coach Kevin Wilson calls in plays from the sideline against Northwestern on Oct. 22, 2016. Credit: Courtesy of IU AthleticsFour days removed from Clemson’s demolition of Ohio State in a College Football Playoff semifinal at the Playstation Fiesta Bowl, a new headline dominated OSU football news. Bruce Feldman of Fox Sports said that former Indiana Hoosiers coach Kevin Wilson is expected to be named the new offensive coordinator at OSU. That same day, Ryan Day, former NFL assistant, was named the new quarterbacks coach, replacing Tim Beck who has left for Texas.Former #Indiana HC Kevin Wilson is expected to become #OhioState’s new OC, source tells @FoxSports. Meeting w/ OSU today.— Bruce Feldman (@BruceFeldmanCFB) January 4, 2017OSU’s offense will likely be under new direction in 2017. And for good reason.OSU’s offense struggled for much of the 2015 and 2016 seasons, most visibly in the passing game. Redshirt junior quarterback J.T. Barrett had just 127 passing yards and the offense totaled 215 yards in the Fiesta Bowl, showing Meyer that a change had to happen on offense if he is to capture that second national championship in his tenure in Columbus.Following OSU’s last two games against Clemson and coach Dabo Swinney, Meyer has retooled both sides of the ball — the defense in 2014 after the Orange Bowl and the offense after the 2016 Fiesta Bowl.Meyer was adamant that Buckeye Nation would not see another loss like it had just witnessed, 31-0. With the expected hiring of Wilson and the addition of Day, not only has he sent a clear message that he’s gunning for a national title in 2017, but he also better hope he got it right this time.“Ohio State is not used to this,” Meyer said. “I’m not used to this, and we will not get used to this. That’s not going to happen again.”Under his watch at Indiana, Wilson had his team consistently in the upper echelon of the country in passing offense. Since 2011, his first season at Indiana, Wilson’s Hoosiers ranked first in the Big Ten three times in passing yards per game. They averaged 13.5 yards per completion in 2016, compared to OSU’s 10.9, which ranked 113th out of 128 teams.Since the turn of the century, offenses under Wilson’s direction have performed at a high rate. Wilson made stops as offensive coordinator at Northwestern from 1999 to 2001 and Oklahoma from 2002 to 2010 before he was hired at Indiana. Over those years, his offense finished nine times in the top 20 of offensive yards per game. Three times his offense averaged more than 500 yards per game and six times more than 450 yards.But, given Wilson is officially hired as expected for the 2017 season, he will not have the services of junior H-back Curtis Samuel and redshirt sophomore wide receiver Noah Brown, two of the more reliable targets in the passing game.However, Wilson does get one of his favorite players in college football. A player Wilson believed to be a Heisman candidate in early October when OSU beat Indiana 38-17.“I think J.T. Barrett is an awesome football player,” Wilson said after the game.Barrett ended the year with the same criticism he rode throughout the year, which is one of many reasons he decided to come back for his final season at OSU and not test his luck in the NFL draft. The Wichita Falls, Texas, native will likely leave OSU with nearly every record imaginable for quarterbacks, and Wilson and Day can help him get there.Barrett thrived under the direction of Texas coach Tom Herman when he was the Buckeyes’ offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach. With the passing mind of Wilson and the track record of Day, who has worked with NFL quarterbacks Sam Bradford and Colin Kaepernick, it seems possible that Barrett could see the same success he did in 2014 when he won Big Ten Freshman of the Year.In order to do that, Barrett will enter 2017 with the same challenges of an inexperienced receiving corps that he had entering the 2016 season. With Brown and Samuel leaving early, OSU returns just 61 of 198 total receptions at wide receiver. The departures of Brown and Samuel hurt tremendously when factoring in an already young group of receivers. OSU adds five-stars Tyjon Lindsey and Trevon Grimes to the unit in 2017, but they are unproven at the college level.Despite the youth, Meyer once again promised a better passing offense in the coming season, just like he did in 2016. With Wilson as offensive coordinator, he has a fighting chance. read more

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PASOK turns 40

first_img Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagram The Panhellenic Socialist Movement (PASOK), the centre left governing party of Greece, turned 40 this week.The Movement, as its members and supporters call the party, was founded on 3 September 1974 by Andreas Papandreou, a distinguished professor of economics in the USA in the 1950s and early 1960s and the son of the late Greek centrist leader and three-times Prime Minister of Greece Georgios Papandreou Sr. The founding mottos of the party were national independence, popular sovereignty and social emancipation. Andreas Papandreou, a powerful orator and a charismatic leader, explicitly rejected the ideological heritage and the party of his father (where he was a government member in the mid-1960s) after the restoration of democracy in Greece in July 1974 and went on to form his own socialist party.At the November 1974 elections, PASOK received only 13.6 per cent of the vote and won 13 seats (out of 300), coming third behind the centre-right New Democracy of Konstantinos Karamanlis and the Centre Union-New Forces (EK-ND) of Georgios Mavros, the successor party of the ‘old’ Centre Union led by Papandreou’s father. At the November 1977 elections, however, PASOK doubled its share of the vote (25.3 per cent), won 93 seats, and became the main opposition party. Andreas Papandreou’s governmentsAt the 18 October 1981 parliamentary elections PASOK won a landslide victory with 48.1 per cent of the vote and 172 seats, thus forming the first socialist government in the history of Greece since the mid-1920s. Although Andreas Papandreou had campaigned for the withdrawal of Greece from NATO and the European Economic Community (EEC), once in power he changed his policy towards both institutions. During PASOK’s first government, civil marriages were recognised as equally valid with religious weddings, the left-wing Resistance movement against the Axis in World War II was recognised and left resistance fighters were given state pensions, while political refugees of the Greek Civil War were finally given permission to return to Greece. The National Health System was created, various repressive laws of the anti-communist post-war period were abolished, wages were boosted, a multidimensional foreign policy was pursued, and many reforms in Family Law strengthened the rights of Greek women. At the June 1985 elections PASOK was returned to power by winning 45.8 per cent of the vote.Andreas Papandreou’s government continued to be popular for much of its second term, especially in March 1987, when he successfully handled a crisis in the Aegean Sea with Turkey. By late 1988 however, both the government’s popularity and Papandreou’s health had declined. Responsible for this turn of events were press reports of financial and corruption scandals, implicating ministers and, allegedly, Andreas Papandreou himself, as well as the imposition of fiscal austerity measures. PASOK lost the June 1989 elections with 39.2 per cent of the vote, while the opposing New Democracy won 44.3 per cent. PASOK’s changes to the electoral law though, before the elections, made it harder for the leading party to form a majority government, so a coalition government between the conservative New Democracy and the left wing Coalition of the Left and Progress was formed, led by one of the most liberal conservatives, Tzanis Tzanetakis. Another election in November 1989 produced a very similar result and a tripartite ‘ecumenical’ government made up of New Democracy, PASOK and the Coalition of the Left and Progress, led by veteran professor of economics Xenophon Zolotas . A third election in April 1990 brought New Democracy back to power and Constantine Mitsotakis became prime minister. Despite winning 46.9 per cent of the popular vote though, New Democracy could only secure a marginal majority in the Hellenic parliament.In opposition, PASOK underwent a leadership crisis when Andreas Papandreou was prosecuted over his supposed involvement in a Bank (of Crete) scandal. He was eventually acquitted and, in a reversal of fortunes, at the October 1993 elections, he led his party to another landslide victory. He returned to office with 46.9 per cent of the vote, and his re-election was considered by many a vote of confidence of the public against his prosecution. In November 1995, however, Papandreou’s health began to deteriorate and the party was racked with leadership conflicts.The ‘modernisation’ periodIn January 1996 Andreas Papandreou retired after a protracted three-month long hospitalisation.He was succeeded by Costas Simitis, the candidate of the modernising, pro-European wing of PASOK (the so-called ‘modernisers’, who won an internal vote against Akis Tsochatzopoulos, a Papandreou confidant. In a PASOK conference in the summer of 1996, following Andreas Papandreou’s death, Costas Simitis was elected leader of the party and called early elections, seeking a renewed public vote of confidence. Although the crisis with Turkey over the Imia islets in the Aegean Sea, in January 1996, had somewhat tarnished his image, the country’s economic prosperity and his matter-of-fact administration won him the September 1996 general election with 41.5 per cent of the vote. Under Costas Simitis’ leadership, PASOK had two major successes. In September 1997 Greece won the right to stage the 2004 Athens Summer Olympic Games and in January 2001 it managed to enter the Eurozone. Costas Simitis won another term in April 2000, narrowly winning with 43.8 per cent of the vote and 158 seats.In the early 2000s though, the party was losing its traditional appeal to the Greek lower and middle classes. In order to revitalise PASOK’s chances for the next elections, Costas Simitis announced his resignation as the leader on January 2004. He was succeeded by George Papandreou, son of Andreas Papandreou. George Papandreou’s years Although George Papandreou reduced New Democracy’s lead in the polls he was unable to reverse the view of a majority of Greek voters that PASOK had been in power too long, had grown lazy, corrupt and had abandoned the inclusive, progressive principles of economic parity on which it was founded. Conservative New Democracy, led by Constantine Karamanlis, a nephew of the founder of the party, had a comfortable win ( 45.4 per cent) in March 2004, the election placing PASOK in opposition after eleven years in office with 40.6 per cent share of the vote.In September 2007 New Democracy won re-election with a marginal majority of 152 seats in the parliament. Despite ND’s falling performance, PASOK suffered a crushing defeat, gaining 38.1 per cent of the vote, its lowest percentage in almost 30 years.During the party leadership election of 11 November 2007 George Papandreou was re-elected by the friends and members of the party as leader, and he led PASOK in the June 2009 European Parliament election to a win, whilst four months later, the party enjoyed a resounding victory in the October 2009 general elections, winning 43.9 per cent of the popular vote to ND’s 33.5 per cent.The electoral annihilation of 2012The Great Financial Crisis of 2008-2009, and the inability of the Greek state to secure foreign loans from the markets, in order to meet its needs and obligations towards its own citizens but also towards its lenders, obliged George Papandreou’s government (2009-2011) to seek loans from the International Monetary Fund, the European Union and the European Central Bank and led to the compulsory imposition of austerity measures. As a result of this, PASOK, having been the largest party in an outgoing coalition government in May 2012, under the leadership of Evangelos Venizelos (elected in March 2012), achieved only third place in the elections with a mere 13.2 per cent.The parliamentary elections of June 2012 resulted in a further reduction in PASOK’s popular support. PASOK’s percentage of the vote was its worst ever showing since the party was formed (12.3 per cent). However, the party decided to help in the formation of a government by joining with New Democracy as well as the Democratic Left in a coalition under Prime Minister Antonis Samaras. Today, PASOK is the junior coalition partner in a government run by New Democracy.last_img read more

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Life Has Two Doors

first_img Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagram When Greek Australian author Doris Falidis Nickolas launched her first book Life Has Two Doors in 2016, she never anticipated that in just a year later she would be invited to be guest speaker at the screening of a documentary that was inspired by her book.“I am so excited and incredibly moved by Morgan’s decision to produce this short film,” says the author in an interview with Neos Kosmos. “The fact that this talented man travelled all the way to Palios Panteleimonas just to experience the magic of our tranquil village and immerse himself in our culture whilst meeting people and families that were touched by the 1950’s and 1960’s migration, is just incredible,” Falidis says. Dedicated to her four children, the original book delves into the lives of four young women from the traditional mountain village of Palios Panteleimonas, in Greece, who left their homeland in the 1950’s and 1960’s to embark on an adventure in search for a better future. The screening of the short film Life Has Two Doors took place on Sunday 21 May at the Hellenic Macedonian Cultural Centre in South Australia and highlights the migration stories of the book’s four main characters; Katina, Theodora, Niki and Popi, all of whom at a very young age had the courage to leave their village and seek a better future away from home. Born and raised in Australia, migration was simply a word to Doris before she visited Greece. However, she admits that the trip back to her parents’ homeland at the age of nine had a strong impact on her.“Visiting my parents’ homeland had a profound effect on me. “I felt it then, and I still feel it now. I connected. I belonged,” says Doris who after a number of trips back to Greece, started researching her mother’s past and collecting fascinating and somewhat emotional wrenching stories, as well as delving into the fears and hopes that those women shared after leaving their family unit to seize the opportunity for a better life in a hospitable yet foreign country.The concept of the ‘Two Doors’ made perfect sense to Doris as it ultimately symbolised the two countries, Greece and Australia; doors that all Greek migrants had to walk through to get to where they are today together with the joys, sorrows and social challenges they faced as immigrants in an ever growing culturally diverse society.“Stelios Kazantzidis always had a unique way of speaking right into the hearts of the migrant Greeks, giving them a sense of belonging, therefore it made perfect sense to me to name the book after one of his songs,” Falidis adds. “In essence, since its inception, there is one main theme that unfolds throughout my book and I feel that the director of the short film is also trying to capture. “Speak to people’s hearts.”last_img read more

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Microsoft et Samsung présentent une table tactile Surface améliorée

first_imgMicrosoft et Samsung présentent une table tactile Surface amélioréeMicrosoft et Samsung ont mis au point une nouvelle version de la table Surface. Désormais, un logiciel permet de reconnaître les objets posés dessus.La table électronique Surface s’offre une dernière retouche. Cette nouvelle version a été conçue par Microsoft et Samsung et est équipée de la technologie PixelSense. Celle-ci permet de “donner des yeux” aux écrans LCD, explique ITespresso.fr. Ainsi, la table reconnaît les doigts ou certains objets et peut les dessiner sur l’écran. “Nous avons choisi de nous associer à Samsung car cette société est à la pointe de la technologie LCD, de la conception de matériel, de la production, du marketing et de la vente à l’international d’écrans grand format”, explique Panos Panay, directeur général de Microsoft Surface. La table devrait sortir cette année et sera disponible dans 23 pays. De grosses entreprises sont intéressées car la table permettra d’aider à la vente de produits, de satisfaire et de fidéliser les clients.Le 10 janvier 2011 à 14:16 • Emmanuel Perrinlast_img read more

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Fundraising underway for injured motorcyclist

first_imgCo-workers of Michael Scoggins, the 21-year-old Clark County motorcyclist injured in a crash more than two weeks ago, have organized fundraising efforts including a 5K run to offset his medical costs.Scoggins has remained at PeaceHealth Southwest Medical Center since Aug. 24. On Tuesday, he was listed in critical condition.Scoggins was riding a 2006 Kawasaki EX250 north on Northeast 152nd Avenue about 11:45 p.m. Aug. 23 when an eastbound 2000 Chrysler minivan pulled in front of him at Northeast 144th Street. The driver of the minivan, Denni Hamilton-Levonian, 55, also of Clark County, reportedly did not see the motorcycle, according to the sheriff’s office.No citations have been issued, but the sheriff’s office traffic unit is continuing to investigate.Scoggins has worked for more than a year on the marketing team for Ryonet, a Vancouver company that sells screen printing supplies.When his co-workers heard about his crash, they pulled together and created a campaign page to raise money for his medical costs, http://igg.me/at/mike-scoggins.They also organized a 5K run for 9 a.m. Sunday at the Salmon Creek Trail near Klineline Pond, 1112 N.E. 117th St.Registration is not necessary, but race participants are asked to bring a donation for Scoggins’ family. Donuts, coffee, bananas and water will be provided at the start/finish line, and the first 50 participants will receive a race T-shirt.“We were sort of in shock mode once we found out what happened to him,” said co-worker Heather Ashlock. “You just feel so helpless. You can’t make him better. So we’re hoping to give his family support and hopefully offset the burden and the stress of the ‘How are we going to pay for all of this?’”More information on the run can be found at http://www.ryonetblog.com/think-mike.last_img read more

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The top 10 most read stories MayJune 2016

first_imgThe top 10 most-read stories on www.employeebenefits.co.uk between 12 May and 20 June 2016:1. Rolls-Royce Group named UK’s most attractive large employerThe 2016 Global Randstad Awards named Rolls-Royce Group as the large organisation that UK employees would most like to work for. bit.ly/28Ir1VD2. SD Worx acquires Ceridian UK and IrelandThe HR service provider has acquired Ceridian UK and Ceridian Ireland in a full share acquisition. The organisations are also partnering to deliver cloud human capital management software across Europe. bit.ly/28IiFLb3. Chiswick Park launches lunch-hour summer events programmeChiswick Park Enjoy-Work has organised a summer events programme for employees of the 45 organisations on site. Events include a bake-off, summer concert, outdoor cinema and an animal-petting zoo. bit.ly/28IFSvV4. University of Lincoln wins Employee Benefits Awards 2016 Grand PrixWinners of the Employee Benefits Awards 2016 were announced at the lunch-time ceremony and summer party. bit.ly/28IEw5t5. US organisation pays for employee’s weddingAfter paying for the wedding of an employee who spent his wedding savings on his mother’s medical bills, US grocery and bulk goods delivery organisation Boxed Wholesale is to extend the benefit to all full-time employees. bit.ly/28IAsGg6. Robot lands trainee office manager jobBetty the robot started a two-month trial in a trainee office manager position at The Transport Systems Catapult, where she will greet guests and check office conditions. bit.ly/2617E1z7. Tesco staff in Ireland to strike over pay disputeTesco employees in the Republic of Ireland, who are members of the Mandate trade union, took strike action on 16 May in a dispute over changes to pay and conditions that could affect up to 300 staff. bit.ly/28IL02n8. 93% recognise link between health and employee performanceThe majority (93%) of employer respondents across Europe, the Middle East and Africa (EMEA) believe there is a correlation between health and employee performance, according to research by Aon. bit.ly/28IMLzj9. 61% see improved employee performance through investment in workplace cultureAlmost two-thirds (61%) of employer respondents see an improvement in employee performance following investment in workplace culture, according to research by EY. bit.ly/28Iu8ue10. 73% believe UK staff are likely to call in sick following UEFA Euro 2016 matchesAlmost three-quarters (73%) of UK employer respondents think it is likely staff will call in sick or make an excuse to miss work the day after a UEFA European Championship game, according to research by Robert Half. bit.ly/28Iybp3last_img read more

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Apples origins An oral history from inside the loop

first_img 18 Apple products that changed the world Share your voice Apple’s biggest milestones That included the period after Jobs’ return to Apple. Jobs rejoined Apple in February 1997 after the company bought NeXT for $429 million and he was asked to serve as a consultant to then-CEO Gil Amelio. Less than five months later, Jobs convinced the board to fire Amelio and name him interim CEO.”He went from when he had no position on the board and was not an adviser and ended up taking over the company,” said McKenna. “Those people, Amelio and others, quite frankly, didn’t know what hit them.”Jobs didn’t stay interim CEO for long. But he faced a daunting task. “Apple was in horrible shape,” McKenna said. Jobs “wasn’t sure he could fix it. People don’t realize it took several years for him to get it off the ground. It didn’t just happen.”Jobs ultimately turned Apple around by dramatically cutting the company’s product line and introducing one hit product after another — the colorful iMac computers, then the iPod music player, iTunes Store, iPhone and iPad.”They cut out 50 percent or 60 percent of the products being developed,” McKenna said.dwf15-365279.jpgEnlarge ImageApple launched the iPod in October 2001, which offered “1,000 songs in your pocket.” It wasn’t until two years later, in October 2003, that the iTunes Music Store started working on Windows PCs. Kim Kulish/Corbis SABA “Steve calls me up. … They were just about to launch their online store, just about to launch iTunes … He was all excited. He said, ‘I think these products we have coming are pretty good.’ He didn’t say great. He was a little bit skeptical until the first iMacs, the colorful ones, took off like crazy.”Most people involved with Apple’s early years never expected it to grow as big as it is today, Jobs among them. After he returned to Apple and it was successful and growing, “one of the things he said was, ‘Funny how things turn out.'” McKenna said.”He was just reminiscent. It surprised him. He didn’t expect these things…Up until a product was successful, he always questioned if it was good enough. He never felt, when he launched a product, [that it was good enough] but he would sell it as if it were. In fact, he always felt there could be more or better [features]. His comment of ‘funny how things turn out’ was a sort of comment by him that it all surprised him.”Concentrate on industrial designApple’s colorful iMac line, and Jobs’ close relationship with designer Jony Ive, helped the company recover from near-death. Tim Bajarin, a longtime industry analyst focused on Apple, remembers what Jobs vowed to do to save his company when he first returned to Apple. “When Steve came back to Apple, I met with him the second day he came back,” said Bajarin, who began following Apple in 1981 for the firm Creative Strategies. “I asked, ‘How are you going to save Apple?’ The first thing he said was, ‘I’m going to go back and take care of the core needs of our customers — engineering and graphics designers. I’m going to go back and make sure we take care of those customers.’ The next generation of the Mac was more powerful and had more support for that particular group.”Then he told me — at the time what I thought was one of the craziest things I’d heard — that ‘I’m going to concentrate on industrial design.’ I remember walking away and saying, ‘How in the world is industrial design going to save Apple?’ As you know, it ended up being a core tenet of Apple’s success. A year later, Apple introduced the candy colored, all-in-one Apple iMacs.”Ive became the lead designer behind Apple’s most important products, including the iPhone. Cook named him chief design officer a year ago. Bajarin, meanwhile, continues to follow Apple for Creative Strategies. Will anyone show up? Ron Johnson, the company’s onetime retail chief, said one of his most notable memories at Apple was the opening of the first Apple Store in McLean, Virginia. He remembered the moment exactly: May 19, 2001, at 10 a.m.Johnson helped dream up the concept of the stores’ bright, simple look with long wooden tables holding a handful of Apple devices that people could test. The design was a departure from the typical stores, with aisles and aisles of shelves filled with products. Apple’s retail approach has since been copied by others, including Microsoft.Thirty minutes before the first store opened, Johnson got a call from Jobs, who asked how many people were in line outside. Johnson told him there were about 50 customers. Unhappy with the low turnout, Jobs said they should’ve marketed the opening — the company sent out an email and press release but hadn’t done any advertising. Johnson assured Jobs folks would show up. In the fall of 1983, Sculley, Jobs, other Apple executives and two members of the Chiat/Day advertising firm — Lee Clow and Steve Hayden — were brainstorming about the Mac launch campaign. Business Week had run a cover story that week saying, “The winner is IBM.””We hadn’t even come out with the Mac, so we were all a little bit down in the dumps,” Sculley said. “What can we do that will stop the world and get people to pay attention to the fact the game wasn’t over? It hadn’t even started yet.”The group started talking about the big things that would happen in 1984, and the obvious reference to George Orwell’s dystopian novel, “1984,” came up. They debated, thinking that many marketers might play off the “1984” reference. But they hoped to get the leap by coming out with something in January — perfect timing with the Super Bowl.jobsandsculley.jpgEnlarge ImageSteve Jobs and John Sculley worked together closely in the early years of Apple but only spoke one other time after Jobs was ousted from the company in 1985. “If we do something absolutely heart-stopping on the launch in January, then we’ll preempt it, and nobody else will want to use it because it will look like they’ve stolen the idea,” Sculley said.The Chiat/Day executives had a week to come up with a campaign like “no one had ever seen before.” The 60-second “1984” commercial they created turned out to be one of the most celebrated ads of all time.But Apple’s board hated it. “At the end of the 60-second commercial, there was dead silence in the room,” Sculley said. “Two directors put their heads on the table. Then they turned to me and said, ‘You’re not going to run that, are you?’ I said, ‘Absolutely. It’s the best commercial I’ve ever seen.'”The commercial cost $500,000 to produce, which was about five to 10 times the normal expense, Sculley said. And Apple paid $1 million for 2 minutes of airtime during the Super Bowl. The board told Chiat/Day to sell the time, but they could only offload 1-minute, so the commercial ran.”We ended up getting $45 million of estimated free advertising because the networks kept running it over and over in its full length,” Sculley said. “It turned out to be an amazing start for the Macintosh.”Apple is a religion Apple knew the first Mac wouldn’t succeed unless there was software for it. Getting developers to write software for the computer fell to Guy Kawasaki, who joined Apple in 1983 as the Mac’s first chief evangelist.”It was easy to get people to begin writing software because we were breaking new ground for the marketing of computers and opening a new market for computers,” he said. “We provided a good alternative to the IBM PC and … developers could write software they always dreamed about writing.”But it wasn’t easy to get developers to actually finish writing their software. They were working with an immature platform and dealing with the Mac’s new graphical user interface.imgdjakdjask9706.jpgEnlarge ImageSteve Jobs was ousted from Apple in 1985 but returned in 1997. James Martin/CNET Kawasaki avoided Jobs as much as he could because Jobs “scared the shit” out of him. One day, Jobs came to Kawasaki’s cubicle to introduce him to someone and to ask Kawasaki what he thought of a company. “I say, ‘It’s mediocre, and the product is crap,'” Kawasaki said. “At the end of my diatribe, he says, ‘This is the CEO of the company.'””I passed the Steve Jobs test,” Kawasaki added. “Probably he knew the company was crap. If I had said it was great, it could have been my last day at Apple.”Kawasaki ended up leaving Apple in 1987 to start his own company. He returned as an Apple Fellow in 1995, “when Apple was supposed to die.””The very fact they brought me back was because the cult was dying,” Kawasaki said. Getting people excited about Apple again “wasn’t easy, but it also wasn’t impossible.””There’s a core of people who never lost faith in Apple,” Kawasaki said. “Apple is a religion.”Bill Gates to the rescueWhen Jobs left Apple in 1985, he started NeXT, a new computer company focused on workstations for universities, financial institutions and other businesses. While the computer didn’t sell well (PCs running Microsoft Windows were the most popular at the time), NeXT had very interesting software.”Steve called me and he said, ‘Hey, I’m starting this new company. It’s an amazing computer for education,'” said Tom Suiter, who served as Apple’s first director of Creative Services and helped launch the Mac in 1984. He left Apple after Jobs’ departure in 1985 but kept in touch with Apple’s co-founder over the years. That included the time Jobs was setting up NeXT. “I could not believe how many times [Bill Gates] was using ‘next’ in such a positive way. I counted them up and said ‘next’ would be a cool name for a company.” Tom Suiter More on the creation of the Mac Apple alums: Where are they now? (pictures) I said, ‘It’s NeXT.’ There was like this silence.Then he said,’ I love it!’The rest is history … The irony is it actually came from the mouth of Bill Gates to help Steve.”Suiter never told Jobs his inspiration for the NeXT name. “It probably would have diluted the brilliance of what the name was,” he said, laughing.Microsoft didn’t just unwittingly help out Apple. It also invested $150 million in the company in the summer of 1997 to keep Apple afloat as it was close to going out of business. As part of the deal, Apple made Microsoft’s then-underdog Internet Explorer the default browser for the Mac. And Gates agreed to develop future versions of Microsoft Office and development tools for the Mac — an arrangement that helped Apple win over customers tied to Microsoft’s software.Jobs hired Suiter again in 1998, while Suiter was at Silicon Valley advertising agency CKS Group, to lead marketing communications for all Apple products, including the launch of the iMac. Inventing the future In the 1970s, Alan Kay, one of the fathers of computing, worked at Xerox PARC, the Palo Alto, California-based research group that inspired the Mac user interface and other early Apple products. Kay joined Apple in 1984, a few months after the Mac was unveiled.Kay famously said “the best way to predict the future is to invent it.”He remembers Jobs’ ouster by Apple’s board of directors and the company’s struggle to recover:”It is not easy to summarize ‘what could have beens’ and ‘what should have beens’ because Steve both had some vision and was also seriously nutty along a number of lines. He and I were friends despite this — as much as he could have a friend. Now playing: Watch this: Apple at 40 Most iconic Apple products ever made Steve Jobs’ legacy includes the women he inspired The Macintosh turns 30: Going the distance Apple execs reflect on the Macintosh at 30 More on Apple’s 40th Watch users sound off on Mac v. PC debate in 1995 Apr 1 • My Apple gig: Helping ‘ePeople’ untangle the World Wide Web Apple ended up investing $2.5 million for a 19.99 percent stake in Adobe in early 1985. In 1989, it sold the stake, which had been diluted to about 16 percent, for $84 million.”When you’re in corporations later, it’s so easy to hide behind, ‘Let me check with that person,'” Barnes said. At Apple, it was “No, it’s you. Let’s just do it. Find a way and don’t be afraid of the consequences.”Orwellian 1984 Jobs recruited John Sculley in the early 1980s to help him grow Apple as a company. Sculley was CEO of Pepsi and helped it overtake Coca-Cola as the top beverage maker. Jobs famously convinced Sculley to take the CEO role at Apple in 1983 by asking if he wanted to “sell sugar water for the rest of his life” or if he wanted to “come with me and change the world.” Sculley, who was close with Jobs before ousting him in 1985, served as Apple’s CEO for a decade until being forced out himself. Tech Industry Mobile reading • Apple’s origins: An oral history from inside the loop CNET’s full coverage of Apple at 40 Happy birthday, Apple. Welcome to middle age Apple’s marketing at 40: From reality distortion to the real thing My Apple gig: Helping ‘ePeople’ untangle the World Wide Web “Steve used to have a saying, ‘We hire smart people to tell us what to do, not hire them to tell them what to do,'” said Susan Barnes, who joined Apple in 1981 as financial controller of the Mac division.She worked closely with Coleman in her early days at Apple and ended up reporting directly to Jobs for a decade. Barnes co-founded NeXT Computer with Jobs in 1985 and became its CFO.At one point in early 1985 while still at Apple, Jobs called Coleman and Barnes on a Friday night and said he wanted to buy a chunk of Adobe Systems. Apple and Adobe were closely linked in their early history, with the two working together to develop desktop publishing technology.”It’s something we really needed in the Mac days,” Barnes said of Adobe’s software and fonts. “Laser printing is something that really made the Mac take off.”Barnes and Coleman went to the law library late at night, trying to figure out how to buy a stake of another company. “How do we do this?” Barnes said. “This is usually what you ask senior management. And we were like, ‘Oh, we are senior management.’ It sort of hit you.” 19 Photoscenter_img Editors’ note: This article originally ran April 1, 2016, for Apple’s 40th anniversary. Whether Apple was actually started by two guys in a California garage may be debatable, but what’s certain is that the pioneering computer maker turned consumer electronics juggernaut has come a long way.Forty-three years after Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak set out to turn computers into a tool that anyone could use, Apple has become one of the most valuable brands in the world, with some of the most successful products ever made.Apple has shaped countless industries, from computing to music, and its former employees have gone on to innovate and create new tech industries around everything from enterprise software to smart thermostats.It has reinvented itself numerous times, changing from Apple Computer to the iPhone maker. Apple now is going through another transition as smartphone sales slow. The company is making a bigger push in services, with its first TV streaming, game streaming, news subscription and credit card offerings unveiled during an event in March. At its heart, Apple has always been about creating elegant, easy-to-use products we never even knew we wanted. “It was love at first sight when I first encountered the Apple II at the inaugural West Coast Computer Faire in April 1977,” said Andy Hertzfeld, one of the original members of the Macintosh team who designed the system’s software. “I continue to be thrilled by new Apple products to this day.”Other former Apple executives and partners shared their favorite memories of the company and Jobs, who was, to many people, the driving force behind its success. They include former finance execs Debi Coleman and Susan Barnes, ex-Apple designer Clement Mok, technical visionary Alan Kay, chief evangelist Guy Kawasaki, and Jobs’ marketing mentor, Regis McKenna.Here’s what they had to say.90 hours a week and loving it Apple’s first success came from the Apple II computer, and it tried to follow that up with the Lisa. But early Apple became better known for another computer, the Macintosh. The Mac started as a research project in the late ’70s with only four employees before becoming Jobs’ pet project by January 1981.There was a lot of competition between the Apple II, Lisa and Mac teams. For one off-site retreat, the Mac group, which flew the pirate flag over its offices, had gray hoodies printed up. They read: “90 hours a week. And loving it,” in a red and black font, recalled Coleman, who joined Apple in 1981 as finance controller for the Mac.Enlarge Image Mark Hobbs/CNET Every member of the Mac team, about 100 people at that time, got the hoodie. It was a hit. (See the photo, courtesy of Mok, at the top of this story.)”Within a week of coming back [from the retreat], the Lisa group had a shirt that said ‘Working 70 hours a week. And shipping product,'” Coleman said. “A week later, the Apple II group, which was making all the money hand over fist, had a shirt that said, ‘Working 50 hours a week. And making profits.””Who knew it was going to cause a reaction across the entire campus?” Coleman added.She became head of Mac manufacturing in 1984 and was one of the highest-ranking women in the tech industry. She took over the role of Apple chief financial officer in 1986. At a November reunion of some women on the Mac team, Coleman attributed a big part of Apple’s success to Jobs, saying he made people at Apple believe they could change the world.Look and feel like The Beatles As he was getting ready to launch the Mac, Jobs wanted the computer “to look and feel like The Beatles. Not the late Beatles, but the early Beatles,” remembered Mok, a designer hired by Apple to work on branding for the Mac launch. “Tom Hughes [the creative director on the Mac team] and myself scratched our heads. What the hell is that?”They decided it meant there was a certain rawness to the Mac, but with a sense of passion and artistry. “It’s an artistic expression of technology,” said Mok, who joined Apple in 1982. “This product has been crafted.”cm84macidcomposite.jpgEnlarge ImageThe branding for the first Mac featured a squiggly line drawing of the computer, later dubbed the “Picasso logo.” Image courtesy of Clement Mok (They were so successful in giving Apple a Beatles feel that Apple Corps, the company that owned the rights to the Beatles music, sued the Cupertino, California, company for trademark infringement. The two sides had a long-running legal tussle, but ultimately reached a settlement in 2007 and in 2012 sorted out ownership of the logo.)Mok became co-manager of Apple Creative Services in 1985 and served as creative director for corporate and the education market. He’s one of the people responsible for the iconic imagery of Apple in its marketing and packaging, including the squiggly line drawings gracing early Mac promotional materials.But one aspect of the Mac, that squiggly line design, didn’t feel as much like The Beatles to Mok as it felt like Joni Mitchell. Jobs wanted to mimic the logo for the now-defunct Ciao Restaurant in San Francisco’s Financial District.”I tried but couldn’t for the life of me put it together,” Mok recalled. Apple ended up hiring the man who created the Ciao logo in the first place, John Casado. What came from the team is what’s known as the Macintosh Picasso logo. Some branding elements from the first Mac live on today, including the minimalist white packaging used for Apple’s devices.Find a wayEarly Apple employees, most in their 20s and 30s, were given big responsibilities. “Let’s just do it. Find a way and don’t be afraid of the consequences.” Susan Barnes By the time the store opened, there were 1,500 people in line.”It went from 50 people to 1,500 in a 30-minute period of time,” Johnson said. “It was really fun.”Now with over 500 Apple Stores worldwide, Apple’s stores have become hubs for fans to camp out, often waiting in long lines for the newest gadgets to go on sale. While many other retailers are closing locations amid weak store traffic, Apple Stores bring in the highest sales per square foot of any retail locations in the US, according to eMarketer.Johnson said Jobs sought to create retail stores “so we can market innovation face-to-face” with customers. Johnson saw that mission in full effect when he witnessed the iPhone launch in 2007. He was among a huge crowd at the company’s iconic Fifth Avenue store in Manhattan.”It really showed Steve’s genius at its peak,” Johnson said. “It was the marriage of an incredible product strategy with the ability to communicate with an unparalleled customer experience.”That ‘aha moment’ What impact has Apple had on society? You can see it when an 8-year-old boy swipes at a microwave screen, puzzled that nothing happens. You can’t really fault him. After all, we all instinctively use our fingers and gestures to control our phones and computers, so why not other gadgets with big screens?That child’s uncle, AT&T Vice Chairman Ralph de la Vega, can trace our reliance on our fingers back to the first time Jobs showed him the iPhone, which he calls his “aha moment.” He was one of the first people to see the device and had to sign a nondisclosure agreement, vowing not to tell anyone about the phone including the CEO and board of AT&T — or his wife. De la Vega’s first question when seeing the iPhone was “Where’s the stylus?””[The iPhone] dramatically changed how users interfaced with the device,” de la Vega said. “It really highlights how it changes the expectations of people.”While there had been touchscreens before the iPhone, Apple was the first to show the benefits of ditching a stylus, a move that had a massive impact on the tech industry. Without Apple, we might all still be mashing physical buttons.”Apple accelerated the pace so dramatically it changed everything,” de la Vega said.AT&T became the first wireless carrier to sell the iPhone, something that helped the carrier attract millions of customers. And the iPhone has helped Apple become the biggest company on the planet.On to the next 40.CNET’s Roger Cheng and Ben Fox Rubin contributed to this report.This story was part of CNET’s coverage of the 40th anniversary of Apple’s founding. For more stories in this package, click here. • 12 Photos Comments See All Apr 1 • 18 Apple products that changed the world Apr 1 • Apple’s marketing at 40: From reality distortion to the real thing 17 Photos Now playing: Watch this: “A few years later I was contacted by some long-standing colleagues in computer graphics — who were then at Lucasfilm, and wanted to get out. I drove up to NeXT and briefed Steve on these folks, and then I took Steve up to Marin County to meet the people who became Pixar. The funding of Pixar and hanging in with the serious talent they had was almost certainly Steve’s finest period.”Kay, however, has been critical of Apple’s reinvention after Jobs returned to Apple in 1997.”The return of Steve to Apple and his transformation of the company into one mainly aimed at consumer marketing, was only successful from a business standpoint. The ideals that Apple had in the early ’80s about ‘wheels for the mind’ were now long gone …”I talked with Steve off and on since then until his death, and he would periodically send me stuff for my opinion, invite me to product openings, etc.”I would periodically try to get him back to being ‘centrally serious’ about education, etc. I once tried to get him to remember what he had said to John Sculley to get him away from Pepsi (‘Do you want to sell sugar water all your life, or do you want to change the world?’) — the point being that Steve’s largest preoccupation after coming back was to get Apple to be a success primarily by selling ‘sugar water’ to consumers!”Funny how things turn out When Jobs and Wozniak were starting Apple, they knew they needed savvy marketing and public relations help to launch the world’s first personal computer. They liked Intel’s campaigns so asked the chipmaker who was doing work for it. Intel told them it was Regis McKenna.That began a relationship between Jobs and McKenna that lasted from 1976 until Jobs’ death in 2011. McKenna’s firm, Regis McKenna Inc., helped launch the Mac in 1984. Though the formal relationship between the firm and Apple ended in the early 1990s, McKenna stayed close with Jobs and spoke with him about once a month for the duration of the Apple co-founder’s life. “He said, ‘I think these products we have coming are pretty good.’ He didn’t say great. He was a little bit skeptical until the first iMacs, the colorful ones, took off like crazy.” Regis McKenna 2:55 7 1:06 Tags Suiter remembers his conversation with Jobs about naming the new company.”I said, ‘Congrats, it’s great. What are you going to call it?’Jobs said: ‘Two.’I said: ‘What do you mean?’Jobs said: ‘It’s my second company.’I said: ‘Everybody’s going to go, what happened to one?’Jobs said: ‘That’s exactly why I’m talking to you. I need some help.’I said, ‘Let me think about it.'”That weekend, Suiter flew to Seattle to attend a CD-ROM conference hosted by Microsoft and keynoted by co-founder Bill Gates. “I could not believe how many times he was using ‘next’ in such a positive way. I counted them up and said ‘next’ would be a cool name for a company.”When Suiter got home on Sunday, he called Jobs and said he had the perfect name for his new company.”He goes, ‘Hey, what is it?’ Apple at 40 Applelast_img read more

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School bags distributed

first_imgPatancheru: Local MLA Gudem Mahipal Reddy distributed free school bags to the students of government primary school at Pashamailaram village here on Tuesday, with the financial support of Upasarpanch Mothe Krishna. Addressing the gathering, he said that there should be social commitment among the people in helping the poor and the downtrodden.The Gokul Industries and the Gokul Transport Enterprises Chairman Krishna extended cooperation in the distribution of school bags. The MLA lauded the gesture of the industry in providing bags to the students, who were mostly from poor families. He called upon industrialists to get inspired by Krishna in discharging their social responsibility. Also Read – With 61 feet high, Khairatabad Ganesh claimed to be tallest idol in India Advertise With Us “They should take up social service programmes”, Reddy stressed. In his speech, Krishna said that he decided to distribute school bags with a view to assisting the poor students. He promised to undertake more such social service activities, with the cooperation of the MLA, to be a model for others. Several TRS leaders, village leaders and teachers were present.last_img read more

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Scientists develop vaccine against cattle disease

first_img Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Viral life cycle of malignant catarrhal fever explained Citation: Scientists develop vaccine against cattle disease (2013, April 30) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-04-scientists-vaccine-cattle-disease.html Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (Phys.org) —Malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) is a disease that is almost always fatal in cattle. Cows contract MCF after coming into contact with wildebeest carrying a form of herpes virus known as alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 (AlHV-1). In a paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Benjamin Dewals of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Liège in Belgium and his team report that they have discovered the gene that enables AlHV-1 infection to progress to MCF, and they have developed a vaccine against the disease. More information: An essential role for γ-herpesvirus latency-associated nuclear antigen homolog in an acute lymphoproliferative disease of cattle, PNAS, Published online before print April 29, 2013, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1216531110 AbstractWildebeests carry asymptomatically alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 (AlHV-1), a γ-herpesvirus inducing malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) to several ruminant species (including cattle). This acute and lethal lymphoproliferative disease occurs after a prolonged asymptomatic incubation period after transmission. Our recent findings with the rabbit model indicated that AlHV-1 infection is not productive during MCF. Here, we investigated whether latency establishment could explain this apparent absence of productive infection and sought to determine its role in MCF pathogenesis. First, whole-genome cellular and viral gene expression analyses were performed in lymph nodes of MCF-developing calves. Whereas a severe disruption in cellular genes was observed, only 10% of the entire AlHV-1 genome was expressed, contrasting with the 45% observed during productive infection in vitro. In vivo, the expressed viral genes included the latency-associated nuclear antigen homolog ORF73 but none of the regions known to be essential for productive infection. Next, genomic conformation analyses revealed that AlHV-1 was essentially episomal, further suggesting that MCF might be the consequence of a latent infection rather than abortive lytic infection. This hypothesis was further supported by the high frequencies of infected CD8+ T cells during MCF using immunodetection of ORF73 protein and single-cell RT-PCR approaches. Finally, the role of latency-associated ORF73 was addressed. A lack of ORF73 did not impair initial virus replication in vivo, but it rendered AlHV-1 unable to induce MCF and persist in vivo and conferred protection against a lethal challenge with a WT virus. Together, these findings suggest that a latent infection is essential for MCF induction. Every year, 1.3 million wildebeest migrate across eastern Africa. Almost all of them carry the AlHV-1 virus, which has no effect on them. When wildebeest enter grazing areas, young wildebeest spread the virus through their nasal secretions, infecting cattle. Infected cattle develop MCF, which causes immune cell production to spin out of control, leading to death within a few weeks. MCF is devastating to the Masai people of the region, whose lives depend on livestock farming. Wildebeest in zoos can also spread AlHV-1, causing MCF, for which there is no cure, in some endangered ruminant species. Herpes viruses such as AlHV-1 can replicate in cells that they infect, or they can remain dormant, in a latent state. To determine which method AlHV-1 uses, Dewals and his team infected calves with the virus. All of the calves developed MCF. The researchers then analyzed cellular and viral RNA from the calves’ lymph nodes. They discovered that the virus took the form of episomes, ringed structures that indicate latency, and that infected T-cells contained high levels of the gene ORF73, which codes for a protein needed to maintain latency. Dewals and his colleagues then created a recombinant form of AlHV-1 that lacked ORF73. While this version of the virus was still able to replicate, rabbits infected with it never developed MCF. When the researchers infected these rabbits with normal AlHV-1, the rabbits did not develop the disease, indicating that the knockout virus could be act as a vaccine.According to the team, the virus’ latency creates an evolutionary advantage for both itself and the wildebeest. Because AlHV-1 can persist in wildebeest without causing it any harm, it spreads easily through the entire population, gaining a huge number of hosts. At the same time, the virus kills other species that compete with wildebeest for resources. Transmission of AlHV-1 is highest during wildebeest calving season. Animals weakened by MCF would attract the attention of predators that would otherwise prey on wildebeest calves. © 2013 Phys.orglast_img read more

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Zandré gets the crowd dancingZandré gets the crowd dancing

first_imgWebsiteWebsiteWebsite WebsiteWebsiteWebsite WebsiteWebsiteWebsite Zandré performed at the Ladysmith Show on Friday evening and her set-list kept the crowd thoroughly entertained.If you were perhaps wondering, Zandré is her real name. She started her professional singing career after finishing school. “I really just wanted to be the best I could possibly be at my craft,” says this humble musician.Music is a passion with Zandré and within the next five years, she hopes to be an established African artist playing at festivals to make a difference in people’s lives and bring different cultures together.Her role models include Claire Johnson and Elvis Blue.Born in Cape Town and now living in Pretoria, her motto in life is: “All good things happen in His (God’s) time”.Aside from her love for music, other hobbies include photography and makeup.She enjoyed performing at the Ladysmith Show and described the people here as “mense mense”.Zandré’s debut album ‘Embracing Africa’ is available in all music stores and will be in Musica by the end of June. DID YOU KNOW?Click on the words highlighted in red to read more on this and related topics.If you are reading this on your cellphone and there are telephone numbers provided in the text, you can call these simply by clicking on them.To receive news links via WhatsApp.For the latest news, visit our webpage or follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Join us there!,DID YOU KNOW?Click on the words highlighted in red to read more on this and related topics.If you are reading this on your cellphone and there are telephone numbers provided in the text, you can call these simply by clicking on them.To receive news links via WhatsApp.For the latest news, visit our webpage or follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Join us there!center_img For more visit www.zandre.co.zalast_img read more

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Warming oceans are turning sea stars to goo and killing lobsters scientists

first_imgRelated posts:Costa Rica says it will support new shark protections despite agreements with fishermen This strange little sea snail uses water wings to ‘fly’ Scientists figure out why female turtles are born at higher temperatures Costa Ricans pledge to go car free on Sept. 22 Warming waters in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans have increased the prevalence of diseases that are turning sea stars to mush and killing lobsters by burrowing under their shells and causing lesions, two new studies have found.The outbreaks are so lethal, according to a biologist involved in both studies, that at least one species of sea star has vanished off the coasts of Washington state and British Columbia and the lobster fishery, already decimated in southern New England, will probably be threatened in Maine.In the Pacific, a wasting disease is blamed for the disappearance of the technicolor sunflower sea star. It’s also affecting the ochre sea star, which scientists at Cornell University, the University of Puget Sound and Northeastern University, as well as other institutions, examined for the latest research. Their reports were published this week.The sea star study was led by Morgan E. Eisenlord, an evolutionary biologist at Cornell, and published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B.In a laboratory and at 16 sites on the San Juan Islands off Washington state’s coast, researchers determined that ochre sea stars gradually became sicker as water temperatures rose slightly.Conditions simulated in the lab confirmed what the scientists observed in the field. As temperatures rose, the disease became more prevalent and adult ochres died within days. The disease, plus death, was more prominent in temperatures between 54 and 66 degrees Fahrenheit (12 and 19 degrees Celsius). For the adults, the risk of death was 18 percent higher at 66 F.“The little ones seem to be more resistant,” said Drew Harvell, a Cornell professor of ecology and evolutionary biology who studies marine diseases and was involved with both reports. “It takes them longer to get sick, but once they do, they succumb quickly.”The researchers speculate that all sea stars have carried the virus for a long time. Warming water appears to increase its potency.Large numbers of ochre sea stars washed ashore in California in 2011, but no one knew why. When the disease outbreak was first detected in 2013, scientists thought it might be contained to the waters off Washington and southwestern Canada. Yet over the more than two years since, it has been identified as the source of mortality in 20 species from California to as far north as Alaska.“This outbreak came so quickly, by the time we knew enough about it, a lot of it had already happened,” Harvell said. “The question for this year in our minds is what will happen in Alaska. The sunflower star that used to be very abundant in this area is gone. It used to be that you could see 30 in one dive. In the San Juan Islands, we had 105 divers and didn’t find any.”The lobster study also traced the increase in shell disease to warmer waters.The syndrome — first observed in the late 1990s in Long Island Sound off New York and Connecticut, Block Island Sound off Rhode Island and Buzzards Bay off Massachusetts — is marked by the rapid deterioration of lobsters’ shells. It spread rapidly, particularly in females, which molt less often than males and carry their shells longer, exposing them more to the disease.One laboratory experiment that examined the effect of the bacteria detected them at 50 F (10 C). At that temperature, the disease moved slowly. But between 50 and 68 F (10 and 20 C), it progressed faster. Even after an old shell was shed through molting, the new shell was quickly infected. Lobsters showing signs of shell disease are not marketable.“Shell disease has devastated the southern New England lobster fishery, and now with warming, it’s led to a situation where the Maine lobster industry may be at risk,” said Jeff Shields, a professor of marine science at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science and a co-author of the study.The study was led by Jeffrey Maynard, then a post-doctoral associate in Harvell’s lab at Cornell. It also was published in the Royal Society B as part of the journal’s marine-disease special.Shields said scientists will be on the alert for increases in shell disease levels off Maine this spring and will warn natural-resources managers if they are detected. To offset the stress on lobsters, the researchers could recommend targeting pollution, boat traffic and modes of transmission in the affected areas.Numerous climate studies have shown that the world’s oceans are heating up. In addition, 30 percent of the carbon released into the atmosphere ends up there, leading to acidification that is further destroying coral, shell life and other organisms.© 2016, The Washington Post Facebook Commentslast_img read more

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