Lancaster urged: Watch for gangs

first_img“These people are not heroes,” Deeley said. “These gang members, they shoot people from behind, (they attack people) five-on-one. They’re not going to stand up to a neighborhood that’s standing up against them.” Deeley cautioned against confronting suspected gang members, saying private citizens should provide as much information to law enforcement as possible. “We’re asking people to get on the telephone and give us information,” Deeley said. “We survive by getting information from the public; that’s the key to solving crimes anywhere.” The rapid emergence of Antelope Valley criminal street gangs has alarmed many local residents. Lancaster gang detail Sgt. Derek Yoshino said about 5,000 local gang members have been tracked in a database, and about 10,000 have passed through the Antelope Valley since 2001, when the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department’s Operation Safe Streets program came to the area. LANCASTER – If we build it, they will run. That’s the message Lancaster sheriff’s station Capt. Carl Deeley wants to get out to local residents interested in helping law enforcement’s crime prevention efforts but fearful of retaliation from organized criminal street gangs. Deeley said by banding together and forming Neighborhood Watch groups, private citizens concerned about potential retaliation can effectively intimidate the intimidators. A newly formed grass-roots group called Antelope Valley War on Gangs and Crime is seeking public involvement in its crime-fighting effort. At its first public meeting on Monday, the group distributed information on volunteering in crime-prevention efforts including Neighborhood Watch groups. Sheriff’s investigators have identified 63 criminal street gangs in Palmdale and 113 in Lancaster, with varying memberships, Yoshino said. He said it can take several months before a Neighborhood Watch is officially sanctioned by law enforcement, but the public doesn’t need to wait that long to provide information that could help law enforcement solve crimes. He said the best way to start the formation process is by communicating with neighbors and organizing meetings, which can be at a home, church or business. Yoshino advises residents to be proactive, noting that even in neighborhoods that haven’t reported much crime, street gangs could already be scouting homes seeking easy targets. He said most Antelope Valley street gangs don’t have historical ties to neighborhoods and blocks as do L.A.-area gangs, so they might be more willing to set up shop elsewhere. “Someone in that neighborhood needs to get the ball rolling,” Yoshino said. “Once it gets going, you’ll start to see a remarkable difference.”160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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Boeing earnings and revenue taking flight

first_imgBoeing has bet its more fuel-efficient Dreamliner will win more of the lucrative market for long-range, midsized planes than the Airbus A350. Boeing’s plane is expected to begin service in May 2008, while its first flight is targeted for late August. Meanwhile, Airbus continues to struggle with its superjumbo A380, the world’s biggest passenger airplane, which has been beset by two-year delays that have prompted customers to cancel their orders for cargo-versions of the plane. “Because the markets and our customers are accepting our technology, the backlog represents to all of us at Boeing both a huge opportunity and a big burden to get it done properly,” McNerney said. The company’s commercial airplane division delivered 106 planes as its revenue climbed 7 percent to $7.6 billion. The unit’s operating profit remained largely flat at $706 million, compared with $703 million last year. Boeing’s integrated defense systems division saw its revenue climb 7 percent from the year-ago period, while its operating profit slipped 4 percent to $784 million. Boeing reaffirmed its previous 2007 guidance, saying it expected to have revenue between $64.5 billion and $65 billion, while earning between $4.55 and 4.75 per share. In 2008, the company said it expects to have revenue between $71 billion and $72 billion, while earning between $5.55 and $5.75 per share. Financial analysts called the company’s performance mixed, even though results surpassed Wall Street forecasts. “Some investors may be disappointed that guidance, which remains well below consensus expectations, did not improve,” JPMorgan analyst Joseph B. Nadol III wrote in a research note.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! “We are off to a good start in 2007,” said President and Chief Executive Jim McNerney. “Our record backlog, increasing productivity, and the progress of our development programs have us on track to achieve our growth and productivity objectives.” Chicago-based Boeing earned $877 million, or $1.13 per share, in the quarter ended March 31, compared with $692 million, or 88 cents per share, a year earlier. Revenue climbed 8 percent to $15.4 billion, beating Wall Street expectations. During the year-ago period, Boeing had revenue of $14.3 billion. On average, analysts surveyed by Thomson Financial forecast earnings per share of $1.01 on revenue of $15.02 billion. The company said its backlog climbed 23 percent to a new record – $262 billion – thanks to strong commercial plane and defense orders. CHICAGO – Boeing Co. put more pressure on its European rival Airbus Wednesday in the dog fight for the slot as the world’s No. 1 airplane maker. Boeing reported a 27 percent boost in first-quarter earnings that beat Wall Street projections, while its backlog surged to another record level. Meanwhile, its revenue grew 8 percent. “Boeing is gaining market share and doing it very profitably. That’s a tough competitor,” said Richard Aboulafia, an airline analyst with Teal Group. “Usually, it’s a choice: market share or profit. To be able to do both at this rate is a serious threat for Airbus.” Earlier this year, Boeing surpassed Airbus in plane orders, but the European company delivered more aircraft and held its position as the world’s top airplane manufacturer. Boeing is expected to outpace Airbus’ deliveries next year. last_img read more

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Conservative film movement wants fair share of nation’s screens

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWalnut’s Malik Khouzam voted Southern California Boys Athlete of the Week160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! It’s not an election season, but a party convention of sorts took place last weekend in West Hollywood as the Liberty Film Festival showcased conservative film. And having wrapped its September event in Dallas, the American Film Renaissance festival is planning a Hollywood event in January to similarly lift the red-state reel. Both festivals debuted in the heated Kerry-Bush campaign, when fervent campaigning for the Massachusetts senator by the left wing of the entertainment industry galvanized right-minded filmmakers to step into the fray. Both festivals also debuted in the wake of “Fahrenheit 9/11” and the Michael Moore firestorm. With the campaign over and Moore frenzy in a lull, what would filmmakers focus on to counter the left? Last year, the Liberty festival included “Celsius 41.11,” a documentary rebutting “Fahrenheit 9/11,” and the documentary “Michael Moore Hates America.” This year’s festival featured the Ron Silver-narrated “Broken Promises: The United Nations at 60,” as well as covering topics ranging from immigration (“Cochise County, U.S.A.: Cries from the Border”) and terrorism (“Obsession: Radical Islam’s War Against the West”). There were panel discussions on the Hollywood blacklist, screenwriting, financing and distribution, and film and TV production. Notable guests included talk-show hosts Michael Medved and Larry Elder. And as the Liberty festival lifted up perennial classic film favorite John Wayne with a screening of “The Searchers,” both conservative film festivals take on a heroes vs. villains dimension of their own that makes for a fiery intersection of Hollywood and politics. Before last year’s Liberty festival, I spent much time immersed in the conservative film movement, hearing the filmmakers’ beefs with the entertainment industry and seeing some of the work offered up in response to leftist bent in mainstream film. This past year, I’ve spent more time in the mainstream entertainment industry, meeting conservatives within who would rather not jump into this movement but are far from ashamed of how they vote. These industry conservatives aren’t necessarily shy about sharing their political views with entertainment colleagues if prompted but aren’t keen on political squabbles escalating into something that creates an intolerable working environment or breaks valuable working relationships. Many who identify themselves as part of a conservative film movement take the position that those closeted should not remain so, but should become vocal instruments of change in turning the tide of left-leaning film. The movement, some theorize, needs all the foot soldiers it can get if it’s going to shake up Hollywood. The goals of the conservative film movement are usually defined as asserting the right of right-wingers to work in Hollywood – though the degree to which political preference affects those in Tinseltown anecdotally ranges from blacklisting to a non-issue – and to foster the propagation of films that reflect more “red state” values. Yet these values don’t necessarily have a uniform on-screen translation. At the last American Film Renaissance festival, a voting panel picked the best movie of 2004. First place was reverent religious blockbuster “The Passion of the Christ,” second place was animated family flick “The Incredibles” and third was politically incorrect romp “Team America: World Police.” And the vote was close between these extremely different films. So you have the wing championing more family-friendly or Christian-friendly fare, and the wing that defines conservative filmmaking as not being constrained by political correctness or being free to mock liberalism. Sometimes the two viewpoints overlap. And among Republican voters in Hollywood, one generally finds more social moderates and stronger fiscal and defense conservatism. Because of the industry, one also finds across the political spectrum more wariness of those who might promote censorship in various forms. “Good Night, and Good Luck,” “Jarhead” and similarly politically tinged flicks will have their runs at the box office. The left is omnipresent on-screen. Hollywood conservatives of all stripes can choose whether to join the political reel fight in a rebellious movement, or to focus on making audiences laugh and cry in the mainstream studio system and beyond. Bridget Johnson writes for the Daily News. E-mail her at bridget.johnson@dailynews.com.last_img read more

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Hittner and McGlynn Named Enterprise Bank MVC Scholar-Athletes of the Week

first_img2017-18 Drake Missouri Valley Scholar-Athletes of the WeekSept. 6 – Josh Yeager – Men’s Cross CountrySept. 13 – Kyle Brandt – Men’s Cross CountryOct. 4 – Kyla Inderski – VolleyballNov. 28 – Reed Timmer, Men’s BasketballNov. 28 – Sara Rhine, Women’s BasketballDec. 6 – Reed Timmer, Men’s BasketballDec. 6 – Sara Rhine, Women’s BasketballDec. 13 – Becca Hittner, Women’s BasketballJan. 3 – Becca Hittner, Women’s BasketballJan. 3 – Nick McGlynn, Men’s Basketball Hittner helped Drake win its first two MVC contests over Valparaiso and Loyola, averaging 11.5 points, 3.5 rebounds and 3.5 assists per game while shooting 8-of-12 (66.7 percent) from the floor and 3-of-5 (60.0 percent) from behind the three-point line. In the Valparaiso victory, Hittner scored 11 points, grabbed four rebounds and handed out four assists. She was 3-for-3 from behind the three-point line. Against Loyola, she scored a game-high 12 points to go along with three rebounds and three assists. In Drake’s final non-conference game at then No. 25/25 Iowa, Hittner poured in a career-high 27 points with 21 points coming in the final two quarters. She added six rebounds, one assist, one block and one steal. This season, Hittner is averaging 14.3 points per game, which ranks fourth in the MVC. She also ranks fourth in the conference in shooting at 45.7 percent, eighth in free throw percentage at 80.3 and 14th in the three-point shooting at 36.4 percent. This is the second career MVC Scholar-Athlete of the Week honor for Hittner, who holds a 3.94 cumulative grade point average in business studies. Redshirt freshmen and first-year junior college transfers are not eligible. In addition to the academic qualifications, student-athletes are evaluated on their athletic performance during the period. ST. LOUIS – Sophomore Becca Hittner (Urbandale, Iowa) of Drake women’s basketball and junior Nick McGlynn (Stoughton, Wis.) of Drake men’s basketball have been selected Missouri Valley Conference Scholar-Athletes of the Week, presented by Enterprise Bank and Trust Company, Commissioner Doug Elgin announced today. The two student-athletes were honored for their performances during the period of Dec. 18-31, 2017. McGlynn and his teammates won their first two MVC games to sit 2-0 for the first time since the 2007-08 season. He averaged 10.5 points and 5.3 rebounds per game in the Bulldogs’ four most recent games while shooting 54.8 percent. McGlynn opened MVC play by averaging 14.0 points and 9.0 rebounds per game. In the league opener against Bradley, he finished with an 11-point, 11-rebound double-double, his third double-double of the season, and made two critical free throws with seven seconds left in the 66-64 win. McGlynn followed that with 17 points and seven rebounds in the win at SIU on 7-of-13 shooting and two assists. This is the first career MVC Scholar-Athlete of the Week award for McGlynn, who owns a 3.62 GPA in media production. To qualify for Missouri Valley Conference Scholar-Athlete of the Week laurels, student-athletes must carry a cumulative grade-point average of 3.20, completed at least one academic year at a Valley institution and must be at least a sophomore in academic standing.  Print Friendly Versionlast_img read more

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Women’s Basketball Falls in Overtime At South Dakota

first_img Preview Buy Tickets Live Stats 1350 ESPN Des Moines ESPN3 PDF Box Score Monahan made two free throws with 21 seconds left in regulation as Drake held a 81-77 lead. But South Dakota followed with a three-pointer that cut the deficit to one. Becca Hittner was fouled but made just 1-of-2 free throws that extended Drake’s lead back to two points. The Bulldogs rebounded the Coyotes miss on the next possession but turned it back over as USD forced a jump ball and held the arrow that led to Arens’ buzzer-beater. South Dakota’s (3-0) Monica Arens banked in a runner in the lane at the buzzer of regulation that force overtime with the score 82-82. Chloe Lamb started extra time with a three-pointer for the Coyotes but it was quickly answered by Drake (2-1) redshirt sophomore Kierra Collier own three. HTML Box Score Story Links Collier scored a career-high 27 points for Drake. Sara Rhine finished with her third-straight 20-plus performance with 23 points. Brenni Rose recorded her first career points/assists double-double with 15 points and a career-high 10 assists. Monahan added 14 points while Allie Wooldridge scored eight points off the bench. Arens grabbed an offensive rebound on South Dakota’s next possession that allowed a Coyotes layup to go up two points. The teams then each had empty possessions before Monahan missed one of two free throws that made the score 87-86 USD. However, it would be as close as the Bulldogs could get as Ciarra Duffy made a pair of free throws and Chloe Lamb hit a three-pointer as the Coyotes pulled away and kept Bulldogs at bay making 10-of-12 free throws down the stretch. Drake and South Dakota traded baskets at the start of the game before the Bulldogs ripped off a 10-0 scoring run helped by forcing five Coyotes’ turnovers. Drake, which led by as many as 14 points in the opening quarter, went cold for a spell that allowed South Dakota pull to five points, 22-17, at the end of the quarter. Watch Livecenter_img Creighton 11/16/2019 – 6 PM Next Game: Drake started the third quarter on fire, pushing its lead up to 17 points at the 7:45 mark with Monahan’s short jumper. However, South Dakota answered with a 12-0 run that forced a timeout by Drake head coach Jennie Baranczyk. Following the timeout, Collier kept the possession alive and found Rhine for a huge bucket that stopped the Coyotes’ run. VERMILLION, S.D. – In a matchup of espnW’s top mid-major women’s basketball teams the South Dakota Coyotes rallied for a 102-94 overtime win over Drake University Wednesday night at the Sanford Coyote Sports Center. Full Schedule Roster Despite several Bulldogs battling foul trouble, including Hittner and Rhine, they held off the Coyotes in the second quarter helping lead 47-37 at halftime. In the period, Collier scored nine, Monahan knocked down two threes for six points and Wooldridge had eight points. With little time left in the third quarter, Rose rebounded her own miss and found Hittner, who hit a short jumper to give Drake a 65-62 lead going into final quarter. Drake welcomes a familiar foe Saturday night to the Knapp Center when longtime rival Creighton visits. Tipoff is set for 6 p.m. and the game will be streamed on ESPN3.Print Friendly Versionlast_img read more

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Huskies roll Tigers, sit atop Big 5 standings

first_imgZac Claus put the Huskies faithful on their feet with a 3-pointer not 15 seconds into Thursday’s game and two minutes later they were still standing after Claus hit another 3-ball to open up an 11-0 lead. The Fortuna boy’s basketball team would go on to put on another show as it asserted itself as the top team in the Big 5 Conference with an 83-51 win over the visiting Arcata Tigers, Thursday night at Fortuna High.Thursday’s win puts the Huskies (3-0, 18-1) atop the Big 5 as they now stand as …last_img read more

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A New Ground-Mounted Solar Array

first_img Start Free Trial Already a member? Log in This article is only available to GBA Prime Members Sign up for a free trial and get instant access to this article as well as GBA’s complete library of premium articles and construction details.center_img I’ve lived in an off-grid house for the past 39 years. Since I make my own electricity, my electricity costs are much higher than those of most Americans. Because of my off-grid lifestyle, I often lack perspective when I try to help people who ask questions about ordinary energy choices. (I’ve had to compensate for my lack of relevant experience by undertaking anthropological studies of my grid-connected neighbors.)Back in the old days, I used to haul water in a bucket from the spring, and I made whole-wheat flour with a hand-cranked mill. (Don’t ask.) So when I’m in a retrospective mood, I can be amazed by simple things.“Look: all I have to to is turn this little knob and water flows out of the faucet!”“If I flip this switch, the mill will make flour by itself!”Karyn and I try to keep our batteries charged, of course. In sunny weather, we get most of our electricity from our rooftop photovoltaic (PV) array. When the weather turns cloudy, or days get short, we have to charge the batteries with a gasoline-powered Honda generator.Since I still have vivid memories of the old days, when I did everything by hand, I’m grateful for the conveniences made possible by our Honda generator. But generators are a pain. Anyone who lives off-grid has a visceral understanding of how complicated it is to burn fossil fuels to create the rotary motion needed to power a generator or alternator. Gasoline-powered generators are noisy, require frequent maintenance, and use expensive fuel. Every kilowatt-hour we generate this way is hard-won and expensive.I bought my first PV module (a 33-watt Arco panel that cost $275, or $8.33/watt) in 1980. My PV array (like those of most off-grid hippies) is a collection… last_img read more

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Gas vs. Electric for Heating, Cooking, and Hot Water

first_imgHow the GBA Site Displays Readers’ NamesNatural Gas Pipelines Are LeakingAll About Radiant FloorsThe Pretty Good HouseThe Hazards of Cooking With GasAn Induction Cooktop for Our KitchenAn Introduction to Photovoltaic SystemsSolar Thermal Is Really, Really Dead Our expert’s opinionHere’s what Peter Yost, GBA’s technical director, has to say:I get pretty nervous when I hear about folks using unvented gas appliances inside an airtight or “pretty airtight” home during emergencies when there is no electricity. We make three things when we burn fossil fuels, if we are lucky enough to combust them perfectly: heat, CO2, and moisture. The latter two byproducts can be pollutants if we don’t have ventilation to dilute them or exhaust them.And given the efficiency limitations of atmospherically vented gas water heaters, it’s hard for me to imagine their fit in a “Pretty Good House.” So if you are using a gas DHW appliance, it is either power-vented, direct-vent, or sealed combustion, each of which needs electricity to work in an emergency. [Editor’s note: See further discussion of this issue in Comments #4 and #7, below.]I think one of the greatest leaps forward in the last ten years has been how PV has moved residential high performance largely to a single integrated power source for all loads and introducing us to a “net” thinking about total load: electricity. RELATED ARTICLES That said, natural gas has one advantage over electricity when used for heat, Holladay says. It’s often cheaper on a BTU basis.But there are a number of disadvantages to using gas. Not only does it contribute to global warming, but natural gas pipelines also leak methane, a powerful global warming gas. Gas utilities charge a minimum monthly fee, even when no gas is being used. And, Holladay says, gas-burning appliances installed inside a home’s thermal envelope may raise concerns about backdrafting and indoor air quality.It’s not that cut and dried, Segal says: “It seems to me, there are pro and cons besides the obvious environmental, those being the efficiency, the economics and maybe the logistics. By logistics I mean simplicity and local availability of install and maintenance (should my spouse go before me, I am in trouble!) and the ability to lock and leave allowing us to go on vacation etc.” Think twice about radiant-floor heatSegal has specifically mentioned in-floor radiant heat, but rather than supply the system with hot water from a gas or electric boiler, Dana Dorsett suggests investing that money in photovoltaic (PV) panels.“A 2,000-[square foot] Pretty Good House in sunny high-altitude Zone 6B Colorado can probably hit net zero energy with a PV array that fits on the house if the heating system is a combination of inexpensive electric mesh radiant floor (for maximal cush-factor) running off a floor thermostat, and a cold climate minisplit or two for maintaining the room temperature(s),” Dorsett says.Even if Segal doesn’t think she’ll need mechanical cooling in a house built at an altitude of 7,000 feet, any minisplit that heats also can cool. “Whether you need to run it in that mode or not, it’s there,” he says.“In a well-designed, solar-tempered Pretty Good House, you may find there will be days when some amount of active cooling is useful, though nighttime ventilation strategies usually work just fine in your area,” Dorsett adds.“Cheap low-voltage mesh radiant floors can still be a nice comfort feature in places that might matter (say, in bathrooms). When used judiciously it won’t impinge heavily on the average heating efficiency of a house heated with minisplits.”Dorsett suggests that Segal start with accurate heat load calculations from an engineer or RESNET rater (not your average heating contractor) so the minisplit can be sized properly, adding, “Then, at 7,000 feet it’s important to do the homework on capacity derating for altitude on the minisplits. Some minisplit installers understand it, but (sadly) most won’t have more than a clue (assuming they’re even aware of the issue at all.)” A plus for natural gasAlthough there are good reasons not to choose natural gas, there’s also a good argument in its favor, says Andrew Bater.“In times of disaster, perhaps with the exception of earthquakes and extreme flooding, natural gas infrastructure may be up and running while other above-ground electric utilities are out of service,” Bater writes. “For example, after Hurricane Sandy where we used to live in New Jersey we had no electricity for a number of days, except what we provided with our own small generator. However, we had town-provided water and natural gas. Our old pilot-driven water heater kept on cranking along; it was pretty nice.”With that in mind, Bater installed a propane range when he built an energy-efficient home a few years ago. The cooks in Bater’s family preferred gas, and they know the range will work when the power goes out.“Comforting to know that we can make a bowl of soup if all else fails,” he said.center_img Lydia Segal is planning a 2,000-square foot house in Colorado (Climate Zone 6B), and aiming for “Pretty Good House” performance. Among the many questions she’s trying to answer is whether electricity or natural gas is the best choice for heating, domestic hot water, and cooking.She’s lucky enough to have both a reliable electricity grid and easy access to natural gas in the small community where she lives. So the practicalities of delivery are not really a concern.“We are weighing the pros and cons of gas powered vs. electric powered system for DHW [domestic hot water] and for in-floor radiant heating,” she writes in a Q&A post at Green Building Advisor. “If we set aside the issue of fossil fuel use, what are the pros and cons of each?”That question is the topic for this Q&A Spotlight.[Lydia Segal’s name appears as “User-6885857” in her original post. For instructions on how to change screen names, see How the GBA Site Displays Readers’ Names.] Burning fossil fuels is always a concernIt’s not really possible to set aside the environmental issues raised by the use of fossil fuels, replies GBA senior editor Martin Holladay. Burning fossil fuels “happens to be the greatest environmental threat to life on our planet,” Holladay writes.“Most green builders design all-electric houses,” he adds. “If their local electric company offers a program for the purchase of wind-powered electricity, they sign up with the program. If possible, they install an on-site photovoltaic (PV) system to balance their annual energy use.” Heating demands can be very lowIf Segal’s new house is designed with passive solar principles in mind, and is well insulated and air-sealed, she might not need an elaborate heating system, says Robert Opaluch.“It is possible that the amount of heat you will need even during the coldest ‘design temperature’ days or overcast days will be fairly small,” he says. “You may not be able to cost-justify a central heating system. The inexpensive electric mesh radiant floor or minisplits noted by Dana are likely to be all you need.”Opaluch built a passive solar home in Boulder, Colorado, and installed electric radiant panels in the ceiling on the first floor and used in once in five years. Upstairs, radiant electric heat is needed on only about a third of the nights in mid-winter.“This 1980s house might barely meet today’s ‘Pretty Good House’ level of insulation and air-sealing, but was passive solar,” he adds. “You can calculate the wintertime solar heat gains and heat losses to design a passive solar home that works well in Colorado, an ideal cold sunny climate for passive solar wintertime space heating.” Assessing renewable energyOne potential problem Segal sees with electricity is the proportion of non-renewables in the mix.“Your suggestion about going all-electric is a good one,” she writes, “though it leaves me in a conundrum as the local energy company Xcel, states on their web page for Colorado, 45% from coal and 25% energy derived from natural gas. So no escaping non-renewables. Local ordinances mandate grid connection.”That’s not necessarily true, says Holladay. Xcel offers its customers a program called Windsource, which allows them to buy power that’s generated by wind turbines.In addition to buying “lo-carb” electricity from the utility, using PV to generate her own power offers a number of advantages, Dorsett says. PV will help lower both peak and average loads on the grid, and is cost-effective when net-metering is in effect.“Being connected to the grid, when your PV output exceeds your load and you are exporting electricity to the grid, your power exports are offsetting fossil-fuel use and lowering the amount of power being transferred on the local grid and transmission grid,” Dorsett writes. “Your power is effectively going from your house to your neighbor’s house. When buying wind power from a remote wind farm, it is putting power onto a transmission grid that’s offloaded at a substation to your local distribution, which is quite a bit more infrastructure use.”The rate at which renewables are being added to the grid is increasing, Dorsett adds, with wind power now cheaper than combined-cycle natural gas, and with utility-scale solar not too far behind. “So even if it’s a heavy fossil-fired grid in September 2017, within the life cycle of your heating system that is likely to change dramatically.”last_img read more

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Moving Pictures: Facebook Adds Video To Instagram

first_imgFacebook is Becoming Less Personal and More Pro… The videos are limited to 15 seconds—a bit longer than Vine’s six-second limit. And crucially, there’s an ability to very simply edit videos as you take them. With Vine’s current app, you have to start over from the beginning.Instagram’s known for its photo filters—and there are entirely new filters for video included. Users can also pick a cover frame for the video from any still image captured.“This is the same Instagram we know and love, but it moves,” says Systrom.Instagram video will be available for both Android smartphones and iPhones today, Systrom said. It will also include an autostabilization feature Instagram calls Cinema.Setting The Stage For Video AdsInterestingly, the 15-second limit is longer than some reports had it. (Rumors suggested Instagram videos might vary from 5 to 10 seconds in length.)But it is long enough for short-form video advertisements. Ad Age recently reported that Facebook, Instagram’s owner, might delay the launch of video ads until the fall.That delay might disappoint eager advertisers. But it will allow time for Instagram users to flood Facebook with short videos.By that time, users will be far more accustomed to seeing videos in their news feeds. And marketers will likely experiment with Instagram to create promotional clips that fit into this new stream of videos seamlessly. When Facebook starts offering video ads, one way it might sell them is to let marketers pay to promote Instagram videos on Facebook—a far less obtrusive way of bringing video ads to the social network.Photo by Owen Thomas for ReadWrite owen thomas Related Posts As we pulled into Facebook’s Menlo Park headquarters, the company’s sign echoed an invitation sent to journalists: “A small team is working on something big.”What is that something?“I’d like to introduce video on Instagram,” Instagram founder Kevin Systrom announced Thursday morning. Instagram: More Than Photos“Instagram is a way to stay connected,” said Systrom, now nearly a year into his employment at Facebook after its $1 billion acquisition of the photo-sharing startup last year. Systrom defined Instagram as a place for “visual imagery,” “moments,” a “place for love”—”no single thing, but a collection of ideas and inspiration.”Notably, he didn’t say Instagram was about photos. Instagram has a lot of photos, mind you: 16 billion of them, Systrom announced, taken by 130 million users.“We’ve taken photos and made them beautiful,” said Systrom. “What do we work on next?”That, it turns out, was video. Systrom said he and his cofounder, Mike Krieger, had considered video years ago, but didn’t feel like they could deliver the “speed, simplicity, and beauty” they could achieve with photos.A small startup, Vine, acquired by Twitter, launched a video-sharing app that suggested one could do exactly that. Many observers have noted this, and it’s widely thought Instagram’s move is a competitive response to Twitter’s launch of Vine.What’s Different About Instagram For Video See also: Sources And Sinks: The Epic Battle To Control How Content Flows On The Web Guide to Performing Bulk Email Verification The Dos and Don’ts of Brand Awareness Videos Tags:#Facebook#Instagram#Sources And Sinks#twitter#video#Vine A Comprehensive Guide to a Content Auditlast_img read more

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Does White Balancing Matter Anymore?

first_imgWith the proliferation of users shooting RAW, white-balancing isn’t nearly as important as it used to be. So is it still relevant at all?White balancing your camera is order to accurately render colors in your image. Improper white balance can yield your footage too blue or too orange, but with capability to do extensive digital photo editing does it even matter? We’ve done a few camera tests to find out if white balance can be easily fixed in post, or if it is still necessary to shoot in the correct color temperature.The ComparisonTo shoot our comparison we analyzed changing the white balance in a RAW and compressed format. Each picture was shot at a kelvin reading of 10,000k, 2,000k, and 5200k then changed to 4850k in the Adobe camera RAW editor. Feel free to click on the following images below to get a better look at the results. Note: The images you see below have been saved and compressed in a JPEG format for the web.JPEG 5200k to 4850kThe first few pictures were shot in a JPEG format that is very comparable to a ProRes or H264. A minor change from 5200k to 4850k yielded some very usable results.JPEG 10,000k to 4850kWe then bumped up the in-camera white balance to 10,000k which left us with an orange image. The image, when adjusted to 4850k in post, had lots of color distortion and extreme overexposure. We had to turn down the overall exposure and adjust some of the white and black points to get a usable image. Notice the muddiness in the darker parts of the image.JPEG 2,000k to 4850kLastly we set our white balance at 2,000k and took a picture, which was understandably blue. As before, we adjusted the white balance to match 4850k and had to change the exposure and adjust some of the levels to try and match as best we could. The result was extremely terrible, the colors are incredibly inconsistent and muddy. The image would be completely unusable, or at least, not very good.Changing the white balance when using a RAW image proved to be a lot easier, especially in the camera RAW editor built into Photoshop. To change the white balance all you need to do is simply move the slider to the desired number, but does it still have distortion? Take a look at the following images to find out.RAW 5200k to 4850kRAW 10,000k to 4850kRAW 2,000k to 4850kNotice any dissimilarities? Neither did we. As it turns out when dealing with RAW footage your white balance isn’t determined by your cameras sensor. Rather, the software that assembles the image uses simulated white-balance data from the camera to create it’s own representation of the image. This can be nondestructively changed in post making the white-balance incredibly easy to manipulate.ConclusionSo back to the original question, Does white-balancing matter anymore?As you can see from the images above when dealing with a compressed image white-balance definitely matters. This means if you are shooting in any format that isn’t RAW you should definitely be correctly white balancing on-set. If you are a little off you can still get some good results, but it is much more advisable to shoot it correctly in-camera instead of fixing it in post.However, if you are shooting in RAW it seems like these results show white-balancing doesn’t really matter at all. Each image when color corrected looks virtually indistinguishable and we were honestly surprised by these results. So going forward, if cameras continue to shoot in RAW we might never need to worry about white-balancing on-set again. A post on the Photo.net forums offered up this guidance:When you bring the RAW image into an image editor/RAW converter on your computer, the white balance you set in the camera should be irrelevant, with the possible exception that the software may use it as a default when it first presents the image (but then you can choose any WB you want, of course).The same generally applies to other processing parameters that you can set in the camera, such as picture styles, sharpness, noise reduction*, and colour space. Shooting parameters (such as aperture, shutter speed, ISO, and any settings such as exposure compensation which affect the camera’s choice of any of those parameters), of course, affect RAW images because aperture and shutter speed change the amount of light reaching the sensor and ISO affects the gain of the sensor’s analog amplifiers.I shoot RAW almost exclusively, and usually use auto WB in the camera. I also find it’s close enough most of the time for the embedded JPEG and all the things the camera does with it, and then I can set whatever WB I want when I’m processing the images on my computer.If you have the option of shooting in a correct white balance on-set, why wouldn’t you? It will save you time in post and you will be able to monitor the shots more accurately in-camera. Just remember to not have your white balance set to auto, or it might change mid shot making it even more difficult to fix in post. The next time you think about making white-balancing a big issue on-set just remember it doesn’t make any difference if you’re shooting in RAW.Do you agree with these results? Have you given up on white-balancing when shooting in RAW? Share in the comments below.last_img read more

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