RSL Hosts German Club Tonight

first_imgJuly 10, 2018 /Sports News – Local RSL Hosts German Club Tonight Tags: MLS/Real Salt Lake/Soccer Robert Lovell Written by FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmail(Sandy, UT)  —  Real Salt Lake plays host to German team Eintractht Frankfurt for a friendly tonight at Rio Tinto Stadium.Kickoff is set for 8:00 p.m.RSL returns to MLS action on Saturday when it visits Minnesota United.  Salt Lake is currently fourth in the Western Conference with 29 points.last_img read more

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Oxford: Hitler’s Choice

first_imgOxford was to be the capital of Hitler’s new kingdom, according to invasion plans unearthed at the Bodleian Library, announce staff earlier this week. Documents detailing Operation Sea Lion are published this week, revealing how German researchers were employed to find out details of local road systems, geography, units of measurements, money and even translations of some Welsh words, all to be used by invading forces when they landed.According to Oana Romocea, spokesman for the Bodleian Library, “It’s thought Hitler was never intent on bombing Oxford because he wanted to make it the new capital of his new kingdom.”Of course, Operation Sea Lion was unsuccessful. The plan was to be put into action in 1940, but by September of that year it was abandoned, with the Nazi forces only advancing as far as the Channel Islands. The details of these plans, which were meticulously recorded, will be published in two books, entitled The German Invasion Plans and Instructions for British Servicemen in Germany, 1944. They are intended as a follow-up to the very successful Instructions for American Servicemen in Britain, 1942 and Instructions for British Servicemen in France, 1944.last_img read more

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Ice rink remains afloat

first_imgCurrent plans include the demolition of all Oxpens buildings to make way for residential properties and business offices. Originally, the council had suggested the ice rink could be included within the buildings removed to make way for the development. The suggested replacement plan was a retirement home, due to its convenient location for such a facility.However, despite public concern over the future of the ice rink during a recent city council consultation, the council has concluded the facility will not be removed during its building lifetime. City councillor Colin Cook, executive city board member for city development, commented, “I don’t know what the lifespan of the building is, but we have got no plans to replace it. When the master plan was released it clearly set hares running and we are trying to stop that. Clearly, when the opportunity presents itself, we might be able to replace it but that is in the long, long term.” The popularity of the ice rink is clear with recent figures highlighting it being Oxford’s second most popular leisure centre with 209,860 visits in 2012/2013.Richard Carpenter, secretary of Oxford City Stars ice hockey club, “It is extremely positive news that this has been agreed and the future of the ice rink is secure.“It is a crucial facility for the city to have. Ice skating is great exercise because it takes a lot of stamina.”Oxford students also welcomed the news, among them a number of ALTS players. One first year student told Cherwell, “I really enjoy playing ALTS and am keen to learn more about the game and to play it at a higher level. I am glad the centre will remain open to allow me to do this. The disco themed skating nights are also incredibly popular amongst many of us a social activity, so this facility really is a crucial part of Oxford student life.”Daniel Johnson, an ALTS enthusiast commented, “The news that the Oxford ice rink will be retained is a great load off my mind. Alts, which takes place at the rink, is a great way for students to chill out while still playing a sport.”last_img read more

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News story: Trade growth top of the agenda on Teesside tour

first_imgThe Teesside tour comes as latest figures show goods exports from the North East were worth £12.9 billion in 2017, up by £1 billion on the previous year.Analysis shows that as trade rises, so has average pay which is up by nearly 14% in the North East since 2010, the fastest growth of any English region.Medicines, machinery and transport continue to be most successful exports from the region.Latest figures show that: Teesside is one of the great success stories of the past few years, with trade on the rise and unemployment down. There are fantastic opportunities out there for businesses looking to expand their exports and as a government we want to do everything we can to make it as easy as possible for trade to prosper. Because we know that when trade goes up, so does employment and wages which means more families have more money in their pocket. With regional airports such as Newcastle and Durham Tees Valley set to benefit from Heathrow expansion, I hope to see exports continuing to rise in the region. The government is committed to giving Teesside every opportunity to expand its trade with the rest of the world, the Chief Secretary to the Treasury, Liz Truss, said today (7 July 2018) on a visit to Redcar Bulk Terminal.Chief Secretary to the Treasury, Liz Truss said: export goods from the North East of England to North America were worth £1.2 billion in 2017, up from £1 billion the year before exports to Asia were worth £1.7 billion, up from £1.5 billion the year before trade to the Middle East and North Africa saw a big leap by nearly 20% to £635 million worth of goods The government set out its final proposals to back Heathrow expansion this week, with legally binding mechanisms in place to reserve take-off slots for regional airports, with Durham Tees Valley airport identified as a beneficiary of the expansion.last_img read more

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Tate & Lyle brings in new CFO

first_imgTate & Lyle has appointed ex-PepsiCo man Nick Hampton to the role of chief financial officer and to the board with effect from 1 September.Hampton has been president West Europe and senior vice-president commercial Europe for PepsiCo since last year, following several senior finance and operational roles at the company for 20 years. He will replace Tim Lodge, who has held the position since 2008.Industry analyst Jeffries expects Hampton to bring “energy and perspective” to Tate & Lyle’s ongoing development. “PepsiCo Europe is a $13bn (£8bn) sales business, more than twice the size of Tate,” said a spokesman.“It is likely to be a major customer for Tate’s intense sweeteners portfolio and other products, so we would expect Hampton to bring best-in-class commercial and financial perspectives, honed in a major multinational, plus some highly relevant customer insight.“The challenge for Hampton will be to make the transition from a branded goods, ‘B2C’ environment to Tate’s more commodity-influenced ‘B2B’ model and its various moving parts. With [Tate & Lyle] chief executive Javed Ahmed now close to five years into his role, a more focused business portfolio and investment in a global IS/IT platform now bearing fruit, we expect Hampton to be able to integrate more smoothly than might have been possible five years ago.”Ahmed welcomed Hampton to the company: “He brings with him a wealth of experience in the food and beverage industry and his strong expertise and knowledge will be highly complementary to our team.”last_img read more

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Ihor Ševčenko

first_imgWritten by John Duffy, Dumbarton Oaks Professor of Byzantine Philology and Literature and chair of the Department of the Classics at Harvard University. Ihor Ševčenko, the eminent Byzantinist and Dumbarton Oaks Professor of Byzantine History and Literature, Emeritus, died peacefully at his Cambridge home on Dec. 26 after eight months of failing health, just short of his 88th birthday.At Harvard he was a member of the Department of the Classics from 1973 to 1992, and associate director of the Ukrainian Research Institute from 1973 to 1989. A master of many Slavic and Western languages in their ancient, medieval, and modern forms, Ševčenko was known as a brilliant researcher in history, philology, and literature. Over a distinguished academic career, he held teaching or research appointments at 15 institutions, ranging from the University of California, Berkeley, to the University of Michigan in the United States, and from the Central European University of Budapest to the University of Oxford in Europe.Ševčenko was born of Ukrainian parents in early 1922 in Radość, a village in east-central Poland, not far from Warsaw. His father and mother, Ivan Ivanović and Maria Czerniatyńska Ševčenko, before emigrating to Warsaw, had been active in the Ukrainian national movement, and Ivan had been a department head in the Interior Ministry. In the Polish capital, the young Ševčenko attended the Adam Mickiewicz Gymnasium and Lycaeum, where he studied classical languages and probably others. Already as a teenager he had translated into Polish an extract from one of Voltaire’s works for a student journal.His first university studies were at the Deutsche Karlsuniversität in Prague, where he mastered Czech and German, and in 1945 he was granted a doctorate of philosophy in classical philology, ancient history, and comparative linguistics. During this period, he published a translation of George Orwell’s “Animal Farm” into Ukrainian. For that translation, intended for ordinary Ukrainians, including literate peasants, living in the camps for displaced persons in Germany following World War II, he was able to persuade Orwell to contribute an account of his own personal history and the backdrop to the dystopian novel.Ševčenko then migrated to Belgium, where he spent four years at the Université Catholique de Louvain, studying classical philology and Byzantinology. He received a degree as “docteur en philosophie et lettres” in 1949. He also participated in the seminar in Byzantine history presided over by Henri Grégoire in Brussels. Grégoire, the prodigiously productive and charismatic leader of Byzantine studies in Belgium, was to have a lasting impact on Ševčenko the scholar. Years later, he recalled that Grégoire’s seminars remained for him “among the most exciting of my intellectual experiences.” He also felt an undying gratitude toward the older man for having extended a hospitable hand in a time of need, to himself and others — “the homeless flotsam,” in Ševčenko’s words, left adrift in the aftermath of World War II.Ševčenko moved to the United States at the beginning of the 1950s as the result of an invitation from the famous medievalist Ernst Kantorowicz, and was given his first academic employment by the University of California, Berkeley, lecturing on ancient and Byzantine history. There, he met his first wife, Margaret Bentley. Following two years of fellowship and research in Washington, D.C., and Cambridge, Mass., he became an instructor in Slavic languages and literatures at the University of Michigan. The appointment soon turned into a professorial position from 1954 to ’57, for which his teaching duties included Slavic languages, old Russian literature, and Byzantine history. His next post was at Columbia University where, as an associate and then a full professor, he taught a spectrum of Byzantine and Slavic studies. Some of his first doctoral students came out of the Columbia years, 1957 to ’65.After a stint in 1960 as visiting scholar at Dumbarton Oaks in Washington, D.C., the mecca for Byzantine studies in North America, he began a close association with the Harvard institution that was to last the rest of his life. In 1965 he was invited to join the resident senior scholars there, and he spent the next eight years in the idyllic Georgetown setting, with a glorious library at his fingertips, and surrounded each year by different coteries of researchers on fellowships, as well as by a succession of the most distinguished Byzantinists visiting from Europe. His stay there overlapped for a number of years with the residency of Cyril Mango, another giant of Byzantinology. Here the two friends presided over the center’s intellectual life, sometimes daunting but generally dazzling the junior fellows in particular. On the down-to-earth side, Ševčenko and his second wife, the art historian Nancy Patterson Ševčenko, provided the relaxing highlight of each week by hosting on Wednesday evenings an open house party for the Dumbarton Oaks community.In 1973, Ševčenko made his last major academic move, from Washington to Cambridge, to become the Dumbarton Oaks Professor of Byzantine History and Literature at Harvard, as a member of the Department of the Classics. He taught medieval Greek courses, offered seminars on Byzantine literature and paleography, and trained graduate students. He was co-editor of “Harvard Ukrainian Studies,” which he helped to found. And he was an active member of the Ukrainian Research Institute, which he helped to establish in 1973, until his retirement in 1992.As a scholar, Ševčenko shared an unusual number of similarities — some hardly accidental — with his intellectual mentor, Grégoire: expertise in a remarkable range of Western and Slavic languages; a scholar’s basis in classical philology; student wanderings to several countries; exploratory travels for manuscripts in libraries and inscriptions on site; and a gift for astute, off-the-cuff ideas and conjectures.Mango, one of the most astute readers of Ševčenko, in his comparison of Grégoire and Ševčenko included “a multiplicity of enthusiasms that have prevented both men from writing big books.” On the occasion of the 1984 Festschrift for his one-time colleague at Dumbarton Oaks, Mango expressed the wish for “a book on Byzantium and the Slavs, and perhaps another on Byzantine hagiography, or a least a long and thoughtful article on each.” Over the course of Ševčenko’s career, no book-length narratives were produced, but in rich compensation there were large collected volumes containing a wealth of important articles, some long, all thoughtful, and each an eye-opener for the thoroughness of the scholarship and the vividness of its presentation.For extensive studies there was, at the beginning, the doctoral monograph on two 14th century statesmen and literati, Theodore Metochites and Nikephoros Choumnos, finally published in 1962; and at the end, almost ready for the printer after more than 20 years of careful preparation, there was a critical edition and translation of a seminal biography composed in the 10th century, “The Life of Emperor Basil I.” Among the articles and essays were many standouts. For instance, there was the enlightening and entertaining essay on “Two Varieties of Historical Writing” in which a magisterial Ševčenko compared the “vivid” and the “technical” historian, or, using his more colorful terms, the “butterfly” and the “caterpillar.” There was the widely read and appreciated “The Decline of Byzantium Seen Through the Eyes of Its Intellectuals,” in the Dumbarton Oaks Papers of 1961. In the same journal in 1971, there was the stunning piece of detective work, “The Date and Author of the So-Called Fragments of Toparcha Gothicus,” in which he surgically unmasked scholarly fraud perpetrated by a 19th century Hellenist and paleographer, the Franco-German Karl Benedikt Hase. There is an impressive 1995 overview of studies in one of his favorite genres, biographies of saints, titled “Observations on the Study of Byzantine Hagiography in the Last Half-Century, or Two Looks Back and One Look Forward.” His collected Byzantine papers were issued in two volumes, while his contributions over a lifetime to Byzantino-Slavic and Ukrainian cultural and historical matters were likewise published in two volumes.Ševčenko was president of the Association Internationale des Études Byzantines from 1986 to ’96, and the breadth of his scholarship and accomplishments received further recognition in multiple honorary doctorates, as well as membership in numerous learned societies. Research and literary prizes came his way from Germany (the Alexander von Humboldt Stiftung) and Ukraine (L’viv and Kyiv). The title of the first of two Festschriften produced in his honor, “Okeanos” (1984), captured the vastness of his learning. (Appropriately, it borrowed the sobriquet of a very large manuscript, called “The Ocean,” in a monastery on Mt. Athos containing an encyclopedic collection of texts dealing with the sciences, literature, philosophy, and theology.) In his written self-presentation, he liked to end the long list of his achievements and honors with the modest notice, at once heartfelt and humorous, “His hobby is trout fishing.” In the epitaph, which he composed in Latin a few years ago, he said of himself: “Over a long life he witnessed very many deaths; his own, therefore, he did not fear.”He is survived by his two daughters, Catherine and Elisabeth; three grandchildren; former wives Oksana Draj-Xmara Asher and Nancy Patterson Ševčenko; and numerous students, colleagues, and friends.Interment took place during a private service at Mount Auburn Cemetery in Cambridge. Plans are pending for a public memorial service to be held at Harvard in early February. In lieu of flowers, donations are being accepted to establish an endowment in his name to award travel grants to students in Byzantine and premodern Slavic studies. (For details, visit https://sites.google.com/site/ihorsevcenko/donations.)last_img read more

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Expecting better

first_imgWhen pregnant women need medications, there is often concern about possible effects on the fetus. Although some drugs are clearly recognized to cause birth defects (thalidomide being a notorious example), and others are generally recognized as safe, surprisingly little is known about most drugs’ level of risk.Harvard researchers in the Children’s Hospital Boston Informatics Program (CHIP) have created a preclinical model for predicting a drug’s teratogenicity (tendency to cause fetal malformations) based on characterizing the genes that it targets.The model, described in the March 2011 issue of Reproductive Toxicology (published online in November), used bioinformatics and public databases to profile 619 drugs already assigned to a pregnancy risk class, and whose target genes or proteins are known. For each of the genes targeted, 7,426 in all, CHIP investigators Asher Schachter and Isaac Kohane crunched databases to identify genes involved in biological processes related to fetal development, looking for telltale search terms such as “genesis,” “develop,” “differentiate,” or “growth.”The researchers found that drugs targeting a large proportion of genes associated with fetal development tended to be in the higher risk classes. Based on the developmental gene profile, they created a model that showed 79 percent accuracy in predicting whether a drug would be in Class A (safest) or Class X (known teratogen).For example, the cholesterol-lowering drugs cerivastatin, lovastatin, pravastatin, and fluvastatin are all in Class X. All of these drugs also targeted very high proportions of high-risk genes (98 to 100 percent). The anti-coagulant warfarin, also in Class X, had a proportion of 88 percent.When Schachter and Kohane applied the model to drugs across all risk classes, the proportion of developmental genes targeted roughly matched the degree of known risk. However, the model needs further validation before Schachter is willing to share actual predictions for specific drugs. “We don’t want to risk misleading pregnant women from taking necessary medicines,” he says.One difficulty in validating the model is that the “known” teratogenicity it’s being tested against often isn’t known. Between Class A and Class X are Classes B, C, and D, with increasing amounts of risk, but the boundaries between them are based on minimal data. Teratogenic effects may be difficult to spot, since most drugs are taken relatively rarely in pregnancy, some may be taken along with other drugs, and any effects tend to be rare or too subtle to be noted in medical records. Moreover, data from animal testing doesn’t necessarily apply to humans.“A lot of drugs in the middle of the spectrum, and maybe even some in Class A, may cause subtle defects that we haven’t detected,” says Schachter. “We can’t provide a yes/no answer, but we found a pattern that can predict which are riskier.”Given the degree of uncertainty, Schachter and Kohane believe their model may be of interest to drug developers and prescribing physicians, and might provide useful information to incorporate in drug labeling.“We can now say to patients, ‘This drug targets a ton of genes that are involved in developmental processes,’” says Schachter, assistant professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School (HMS).Or, conversely, if a young pregnant woman has a heart condition and needs to be treated, physicians may be reassured by a cardiac drug’s profile, he adds. “Instead of saying, ‘we don’t know,’ we can now say that the drug is more likely to be safe in pregnancy.”“We have here a prismatic example of the utility of a big-picture, macrobiological approach,” says Kohane, CHIP director and Lawrence J. Henderson Professor of Pediatrics at HMS. “By combining a comprehensive database of protein targets of drugs and a database of birth defects associated with drugs, we find a promising predictive model of drug risk for birth defects.”The study was funded by a grant from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences.last_img read more

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Section reviews state’s workers’ comp studies

first_imgSection reviews state’s workers’ comp studies Section reviews state’s workers’ comp studies October 1, 2002 Regular Newscenter_img Recent legislative studies overstated both the number of Florida workers’ compensation cases that have attorney involvement and the costs of those cases to the compensation system, according to a study done for the Bar’s Workers’ Compensation Section.That review also showed that the costs of the typical workers’ comp claim and the amount paid in attorneys’ fees have plummeted in the past decade.The study was prepared by Rafael Gonzalez, immediate past section chair, and presented at the August 21 meeting of the Governor’s Commission on Workers’ Compensation Reform. Gonzalez is monitoring the commission and legislative activities for the section.“It is not attorney involvement, attorneys’ fees, or benefits to injured workers which are the cause of Florida’s continuing rise in workers’ compensation premiums,” Gonzalez said of his findings. “The commission should further study some of the other stakeholders in the workers’ compensation system in the state of Florida, as well as their interests for an explanation of the continuing high costs of workers’ compensation insurance coverage for employers in the state of Florida.”The legislative studies, Gonzalez said in his report to the commission, were done by the Workers’ Compensation Research Institute (WCRI) and the National Council on Compensation Insurance (NCCI). While containing valuable information, they were based on only 5 percent of the cases and compared Florida statistics with those from eight other states.Gonzalez took his data from all cases filed with the Division of Workers’ Compensation and statistics from 40 states. Thus, while the NCCI and WCRI studies showed that Florida had a higher number of cases where injured workers got attorneys and those cases resulted in higher payouts that other states, Gonzalez’ data showed different results.Statewide data showed only 14.2 percent of injured workers in Florida wound up getting attorneys, slightly below the national average. The rates for other states included 46 percent in Oklahoma, 30 percent in New Jersey, 25 percent in Maryland, 21 percent in Rhode Island, 20 percent in South Carolina, and 18 percent in Georgia.Similarly, the size of settlements has been declining, from an average of $34,804 in 1990 to $10,093 by 1999 — including all costs and attorneys’ fees, Gonzalez found.He noted that the 1993 changes to the state’s workers’ compensation law (F.S. Ch. 440) had the effect of reducing both payments to injured workers and fees to attorneys. His findings include:• The average indemnity benefit dropped from $7,687 in 1990 to $2,240 in 1999.• The typical medical benefit declined from $9,879 in 1990 to $5,929 in 1998.• In 1990, the average attorneys’ fee was $7,642 for a workers’ comp case; by 1998, it was $2,287 or more than a 75 percent decline.“Clearly, as had been the intent of the 1993 revisions to Florida workers’ compensation system, indemnity, medical, settlements, and attorneys’ fees have significantly decreased,” Gonzalez said.Aside from the figures, the report to the commission gave a synopsis of workers’ comp law in Florida, and summarized recent legislative activity. The commission, appointed by Gov. Jeb Bush after the legislative session earlier this year, is charged with finding out why Florida has some of the highest premiums in the country and at the same time some of the lowest benefits.Copies of the report are available from Gonzalez at Barrs, Williamson, Stolberg, Townsend & Gonzalez, 2503 West Swann Avenue, Tampa 33609-4017.last_img read more

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Getting rid of unions is not the answer

first_imgIllogical thinking no longer astonishes because it manifests itself so often. Case in point is Ray Weidman’s Nov. 25 letter complaining about the 20 percent cut to his Teamsters Union pension.While his complaint is legitimate and his anger perfectly understandable (No one should have to endure cuts to a promised pension after years of work.), his conclusion — that New York should be a non-union “right-to-work” state — is completely illogical.If there were no unions, there would be no union pensions and Mr. Weidman would be collecting zero dollars every month. Thanks to the union, he will at least collect 80 percent of his expected pension dollars every month for the remainder of what I hope is a very long life.Jerry JasinskiNiskayunaMore from The Daily Gazette:Niskayuna girls’ cross country wins over BethlehemEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusPuccioni’s two goals help Niskayuna boys’ soccer top Shaker, remain perfectEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidation Categories: Letters to the Editor, Opinionlast_img read more

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The return of negative equity

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