Ecopetrol acquires 30% stake in two Brazilian oil blocks

first_img Image: Ecopetrol acquires 30% of the Gato do Mato discovery in Brazil’s Pre-Salt. Photo: Courtesy of rawpixel from Pixabay. Colombian integrated oil company Ecopetrol, through its subsidiary Ecopetrol Óleo e Gás do Brasil, has signed an agreement with Shell Brasil Petróleo to acquire 30% interests, rights and obligations for two blocks in Pre-Salt, Brazil.The blocks included in the acquisition are associated with the BM-S-54 Concession Agreement and the Sul de Gato do Mato Shared Production Agreement, located offshore in Santos basin, Pre-Salt, Brazil.Ecopetrol president Felipe Bayon said: “Joining this discovery in the Brazilian Pre-Salt with world-class companies is part of our growth and internationalization strategy, focused on high potential basins such as Santos in Brazil.“This acquisition balances our production portfolio by adding light hydrocarbons. In 2018 we announced the entrance into the Pre-Salt, an area with one of the greatest potential in the continent. Today we strengthen our presence by being part of a discovery that will give us production in a few years.”Three wells drilled in the two blocks have discovered light hydrocarbonsUnder the transaction agreement, the company is entitled to 30% interest, while Shell divests its stake from 80% to 50% and continues as an operator, and Total retains the remaining 20%.Ecopetrol said that the Brazilian government would also participate in the Shared Production Agreement through Pré-Sal Petróleo (PPSA), while the oil companies proportionally maintain their respective percentages following the discounting of the share.In addition, the company estimates that under its share, it could produce a total of approximately 20,000barrels per day of crude in 2025.The transaction agreement between Ecopetrol Óleo e Gás do Brasil and Shell Brasil Petróleo is subject to the approval of assignment to Ecopetrol by Brazil’s Ministry of Mines and Energy, National Agency of Petroleum, Natural Gas and Biofuels and other customary transaction conditions.The company said that the agreement complements its strategy of capital discipline and sustainable growth in reserves and production and is expected to strengthen its position in the Santos basin in Brazil. Under the transaction, Ecopetrol gets 30% interest, while Shell divests its stake from 80% to 50% and Total retains the remaining 20%last_img read more

Continue reading

You do the maths: why aren’t female mathematicians getting firsts?

first_imgA University spokesperson told Cherwell: “The University is fully committed to gender equality, including both the representation of women and the advancement of women’s careers in STEM subjects.“This commitment includes our participation in the Athena SWAN Charter, with an institutional award and 30 departmental awards across the University. The University has committed to the revised Athena Swan Charter, which includes developing this work into humanities and social sciences departments.”However, Oxford’s efforts to increase the number of female Maths undergraduates appear to be working better than Cambridge’s: while 37% of the Oxford offer-holders for Maths in 2017 were female, this figure was just 17% at Cambridge.Professor Helen Byrne, the Director of Equality and Diversity within the Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences Division suggested that Oxford’s intake reflects the gender split of secondary education.“Students are required to have double-Maths [Maths and Further Maths] at A-level for entry… therefore we have a smaller pool of female students to draw upon,” she told Cherwell.“Indeed, the gender balance of Maths undergraduates reflects the gender balance of students taking double-Maths at A-level.”In 2015, only 29.1% of the 14,363 entrants for Further Maths ALevel were female. In the 2015/16 academic year, a slightly smaller percentage of Oxford Maths undergraduates were women, with 24.6% of that year’s intake identifying as female. Professor Byrne also highlighted the Department’s outreach work, suggesting that positive steps were being taken to address the problem at its source.“In recent years, [the Maths Department] has been running an increasing number of outreach events targeted specifically at women; they now annually reach thousands of women, including hundreds who are pre-A-level.“We are also developing online material in order reach an even bigger audience and to enthuse more students in general to take Further Maths A-level.”She also drew positives from recent data. “It indicates that, on average, the exam performance of female Maths undergraduates [at] Oxford improves during their studies,” she told Cherwell.If this is indeed the case, then this year’s Prelims results should be reason for optimism in the Department’s attempts to close the gender gap.While the percentage of men achieving firsts fell slightly, from 36.1% to 33.6%, 23.1% of women were awarded firsts, up from 14.9% in 2016.A member of the University’s Mirzakhani Society, which represents Maths students identifying as female or gender non-binary, suggested that female students are more likely to experience problemsolving difficulties when around male students.Helen Zha told Cherwell: “One thing I’ve heard and felt is that where there are more males in the room, women will experience stereotype threat more strongly and perform worse than they would otherwise.”“Being aware of this and talking about [it] as a widespread phenomenon as opposed to it feeling exclusively like a personal problem could be helpful.”Another member, Jess Woods, claimed that the problem was one that needed to be addressed not by Oxford, but by the UK’s education system in general.“We need a cultural shift. When I said I wanted to do Maths at uni, I was questioned and doubted. My male friends doing Maths were just encouraged. How can women perform as well when they spend their lives being told they shouldn’t?”Clearly, the blame does not lie solely with the University in this instance: while Oxford could be doing more, the low number of female Further Maths A-Level students is the real cause for concern. The University’s Mathematics Department has held firm in spite of an examiners’ report suggesting that changes implemented with the intention of closing the gender disparity in finals results have failed.Just seven female Maths finalists achieved firsts in 2017, compared to 45 men. This means that only 21.2% of women graduated with first-class degrees – a decrease of 4.4% from 2016 – while that figure was 45.5% for men.Furthermore, 15.2% of women achieved a 2.2 or below, compared to only 9.1% of male students.The widening of the gender gap in results comes despite an increase in time allowance from 90 minutes to 105 minutes, introduced under the belief that female candidates were “more likely to be adversely affected by time pressure.”In their report, the examiners described themselves as “concerned” by the statistics, saying: “We would like to bring this year’s very significant gender discrepancy to the attention of the department, which we know is already well aware of this issue.”However, in a statement to Cherwell, the Mathematics Department claimed that the change had worked well: “Whilst there is clearly more progress to be made, the departments guardedly feel that this change was a positive one.“We will continue with the longer papers for the foreseeable future, monitoring the exam data carefully.”The Department highlighted the fact that the gender gap for the 2017 cohort had closed slightly from their second-year papers.“Some improvement in performance might be expected as students choose options suited to their strengths, but the improvements for female students outdid the marginal improvement for male students… particularly in the reduction of 2.2s,” they said.The disparity regarding results is much more marked in the three year BA Maths degree than in the four-year MMath course. In the 2017 MMath results, a slightly higher percentage of female students were awarded firsts than male students – although there were only 18 female candidates compared to 66 male.last_img read more

Continue reading

OCHS Crew Holds Their Own at Lake Lenape

first_imgAll of the race results can be found online at: rowtown.org/lrs/schedule.jsp?regattaName=Lenape+Sprints+IV&regattaDate=2021-04-10If you are interested in watching via live-stream & replay, you can go to Lake Lenape Crew Race Live Stream 2021: (9) Lake Lenape Crew Race Live Stream 2021 | Facebook Mild temperatures and a moderate headwind made for a nice day for racing on Saturday.The highlights of the day were the Ocean City Boys and Girls lightweight four crews, who both won.The boys’ lightweight four included: stroke Christopher Horan, Flynn DeVlieger, Drew Young, bow Mike Dickinson and coxswain Riley Fisher.The girls lightweight four included: stroke Zoey Driscoll, Danielle Weidner, Eileen Seif, bow Lilly Teofanova and coxswain Maria Mastrando.Overall it was a nice showing for Ocean City and hopefully will help the team compete beyond the six scheduled Lake Lenape races. The boys’ lightweight four included: stroke Christopher Horan, Flynn DeVlieger, Drew Young, bow Mike Dickinson and coxswain Riley Fisher.last_img read more

Continue reading

Wiltshire baker takes the National Cupcake crown

first_imgA baker from Wiltshire swept the board at the National Cupcake Championships 2015 winning three categories as well as the Overall Champion crown. Mrs B’s Cakes stole the show with her Wild Blueberry & Belgian chocolate cupcake in the Made with Chocolate category, a Chambord Bramble Berry number in the Made with Alcohol category and a Spiced Apple and Blackberry cupcake in the Classic category, which took the overall award.Mrs B, also known as Helen Bollen, said: “I am absolutely thrilled beyond words to win this. It is something I have been working towards for the last four years and it is going to mean so much to my business.“It means that my cakes are good and it is so good to have that endorsement.“This will help future customers trust in me especially when I am doing wedding cakes and wedding cupcakes.”The judges said the fruit in Bollen’s Spiced Apple and Blackberry cupcake cut through the sweetness, creating a perfectly balanced cupcake.So Sweet Couture Cake Boutique won the Free From category with a Gluten Free Raspberry Kiss; Mad Hatters Tearoom & Bakery won the Children’s category with a Strawberry Marshmallow Milkshake; and Yellow Bee Cake Company took the Seasonal category with a Witches Cauldron.While the judging took place, the 60 finalists were treated to two chocolate masterclasses by Barry Callebaut, which sponsored the event.The event was also sponsored by Hello and… and hosted by British Bakels at its centre in Bicester.last_img read more

Continue reading

Colombia: Authorities seize 1.54 metric tons of cocaine

first_imgBy Dialogo February 08, 2012 BOGOTÁ, Colombia – The Colombian Navy seized 1.54 metric tons (1.7 tons) of cocaine hidden in a rural forest area in the department of Nariño, near the Ecuadoran border, authorities said on Feb. 7. Rodolfo Amaya Kerquelen, the navy’s regional commander, said the narcotics were found in the La Tolita sector of the La Tola municipality, near the coast of the Pacific Ocean. The narcotics were packaged in 77 sacks, weighing a total of 1,548 kilos (3,413 pounds), with an estimated worth of US$38 million, he said. The cocaine was produced by what seems to be a partnership between the Los Rastrojos criminal gang and members of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) operating in the region. Colombian authorities said the same partnership was involved in the explosive attacks that left 11 dead and dozens injured in Tumaco last week. [EFE (Colombia), 07/02/2012; El Espectador (Colombia), 07/02/2012]last_img read more

Continue reading

Panama Hosts Central American Defense Seminar

first_imgBy Roberto López Dubois/Diálogo July 16, 2018 From June 5-9, 2018, Panama City hosted the Central American Regional Seminar on Countering Transnational Threat Networks. The event, sponsored by the William J. Perry Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies, convened 70 experts, including officers of the armed forces and police, as well as civilian professionals from 11 countries. Through a series of lectures and interactive sessions, participants examined the threats of terrorism, transnational organized crime, cybersecurity, natural disasters, and other issues. Experts from Belize, Canada, Colombia, Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic, El Salvador, the United States, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, and Panama addressed strategies and policies to confront these challenges. “The seminar is important as a hub for the exchange of best practices, ideas that work, and didn’t work in the various member countries,” U.S. Army Lieutenant General (ret.) Frederick S. Rudesheim, director of the William J. Perry Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies, told Diálogo. “In this group of nations, we all can learn to fight against transnational threats.” Creating counterattack networks Transnational criminal networks represent one of the biggest challenges in Central America. Non-state actors, who are flexible and can adapt to changes, perpetrate crimes that affect the stability of the region. Cooperation among nations, intelligence exchange, and coordination of strategies to combat transnational organized crime are crucial. Identifying the leaders of criminal networks and disrupting their illicit activities—trafficking in drugs, weapons, and humans, among others—are tasks that should be conducted with a united front. Participants agreed unanimously. For Panamanian Minister of Public Security Alexis Bethancourt, who inaugurated the seminar, the solution rests on creating counterattack networks. “Countries have borders; organized crime doesn’t,” he told Diálogo. “Today, we take a look at these threats, we evaluate them, and we build networks to counter them.” Experts stressed the importance of interinstitutional and international collaboration to disrupt chains of command and production of organized crime. Most of all, participants emphasized, it’s necessary to build trust. “Trust is a factor that generates interagency collaboration, and distrust is an obstacle to cooperation,” said César Tapia Jiménez, coordinator of cooperation at the Mexican Ministry of National Defense. “Central American security can evolve toward expanded and collective security. This evolution can be achieved by fighting corruption and increasing trust among members, and by committing to providing resources to build a multidisciplinary task force that will act wherever the region requires it.” Regional narcotrafficking situation Due to its location, the central region of the Americas continues to be a bridge for the illicit transfer of drugs to the United States and Europe. As such, participants analyzed the situation at the seminar. Criminal organizations move drugs by land, air and sea—the Caribbean sea being among narcotraffickers’ favorite routes. “Our reality would be different if the cocaine route didn’t cross over our countries,” Tapia said. “Also, some things cannot be shown on a map, such as the population’s suffering under the threat of organized crime.” However, the fight strengthened in the Dominican Republic, said Dominican Army Colonel Raúl E. Mora Hernández, an event attendee. In 2017, Dominican authorities seized almost 16 tons of cocaine. In October 2017, the country launched the Empowered Society Reports application, which enables citizens to report illicit activities with their cell phones via text messages, photos, and videos. “The message is completely confidential and showed great results,” the officer said. “Sometimes not only programs, but also principles and values are important, because in our region we have too many drug breaches. Narcotrafficking gets into our lives; it buys us out, including the authorities. But most importantly, […] drugs are the enemies of the future and hope, and when we fight against them, we fight for the future.” For Commissioner Feliciano Benítez, Intelligence Chief of the National Border Service of Panama, criminal policies between countries must be more dynamic. “[Criminal] organizations not only use our countries to reach their markets, but also seek shelter,” Commissioner Benítez said. “Here [at the seminar], it’s not about seeking internal policies, but rather interstate policies.” Inclusive security Among other topics, participants of the seminar analyzed the threat of dissident groups of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, the new key actors of narcotrafficking and organized crime in Colombia. Participants also examined the mara and gang phenomena in Central America. In addition, experts discussed human trafficking for sexual and labor exploitation, and stressed the need to improve migration control technology. Another discussion that generated much interest was inclusive security for gender equality in military and civilian institutions. Carmen Armidis Castellanos, a Dominican human rights expert, praised the progress of military women of the region. The Dominican Armed Forces, she said, have more than 30 percent of women. “There is still a large gap [for] women, so they should keep striving,” Castellanos said. “Men should be understanding and tolerant, because it’s where they belong, not because they are women but because of their skills, empowerment, devotion, and dedication.” The seminar was positive, Lt. Gen. Rudesheim concluded. “Most importantly, we are strengthening communication networks not only between countries, but also among members, the people here [who] know and trust each other.”last_img read more

Continue reading

Colombia Has First Joint Command Sergeant Major

first_imgBy Geraldine Cook / Diálogo October 07, 2019 Diálogo: You are the first Joint Command sergeant major of the Colombian Armed Forces. What’s the significance of this promotion?Colombian Armed Forces’ Joint Command Sergeant Major Argemiro Posso Rivera: I was promoted in March 2018, and it’s an honor and great responsibility for me to be the first NCO promoted to this position. When I took on this role, I set two challenges for myself. The first is to facilitate more education and training for the new generations of NCOs so that they can reach this leadership position. The second is to request and make the sergeant major promotion possible for each branch of the country’s Armed Forces.Diálogo: What’s the importance of an NCO?Sgt. Major Posso: NCOs are the backbone of the military, because we are the commander’s right hand so he can fulfill his goal and the mission ordered by the State. Colombian NCOs are privileged, because our generals, admirals, and officers support us, since they recognize that an educated, professional NCO body results in successful missions.Diálogo: How have NCOs progressed in Colombia?Sgt. Major Posso: The professional development of NCOs in Colombia started in 2003, with the first honorary appointed command sergeant majors. In 2006, the career path decree of NCOs changed and the command sergeant major and joint command sergeant major ranks were created. Our professional development is due to the support of our strategic partners, U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM) and U.S. Army South (ARSOUTH).Diálogo: What can you tell us about the Senior NCOs Integral Program (PISAJE, in Spanish)?Sgt. Major Posso: PISAJE is a six-month program to enable promotion to command sergeant major. The goal is to provide NCOs with new techniques, logistics management, leadership, and knowledge about national security and defense, so that they can support the commander in decision-making. PISAJE has been around for more than 13 years, conducting biannual visits to the United States and receiving NCOs from the region. We expect PISAJE to strengthen even more to allow new NCO generations to reach leadership positions.Diálogo: What’s the plan to continue with NCO training?Sgt. Major Posso: We are working to shore up the Colombian Sergeants Major Academy, so that all NCOs from our country’s military forces can attend and study there and for Colombia to become a regional benchmark. We hope this will be possible with the help of SOUTHCOM and ARSOUTH.Diálogo: What was the role of NCOs in the Colombian peace process?Sgt. Major Posso: The strategy of negotiating with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia resulted from teamwork led by our officers in the Colombian military forces. There’s no question that the NCO corps played an important role. We understood the commander’s goal and mission and helped him to accomplish it successfully. However, we had to pay a high price, because we lost about 6,000 soldiers in 54 years of internal conflict in Colombia, and more than 32,000 lost body parts in the battlefield.Diálogo: What’s the importance of the joint work conducted by NCOs in the region?Sgt. Major Posso: It’s important to work together to share experiences and lessons learned. NCOs have the United States as our strategic partner, and together we can provide new professionalization channels, so that we can have better trained and educated officers that can confront common threats in the region, such as narcotrafficking, illegal mining, arms trafficking, money laundering, and support humanitarian assistance operations.last_img read more

Continue reading

Bar referral service adds new counties

first_imgBar referral service adds new counties The Florida Bar has added Okaloosa and Walton counties to its Lawyer Referral Service which now covers 48 counties.The Bar added the counties when the Escambia-Santa Rosa Bar Association discontinued coverage of the two counties.The Florida Bar Lawyer Referral Service is a public service program offered to provide access to the legal system. Nineteen counties are handled by local bar association lawyer referral services.During 2004-05, the Lawyer Referral Service made over 135,000 referrals.Under The Florida Bar’s Lawyer Referral Service, attorneys charge clients $25 for an initial 30-minute office consultation. Personal circumstances might qualify a client for a free half-hour session with one of a special panel of attorneys willing to handle cases on Low Fee, Elderly, Disability, and AIDS Law panels.More than 1,200 attorneys participate in the lawyer referral service program. Florida Bar members in good standing who have an office in a county covered by the Bar are eligible to join the service by completing an application and submitting a $125 membership fee. The attorney must also carry at least $100,000 in professional liability insurance.The Lawyer Referral Service is staffed at The Florida Bar headquarters in Tallahassee, Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. The service also has an online service at www.floridabar.org that is accessible 24 hours a day, seven days per week. Prospective clients may reach the service by calling (800) 342-8011 from anywhere in Florida. Bar referral service adds new countiescenter_img November 15, 2005 Regular Newslast_img read more

Continue reading

Homeless Man Gets 25 to Life for Freeport Murder

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A homeless man was sentenced Monday to 25 years to life in prison for fatally stabbing a 21-year-old man with whom he had an ongoing dispute following a fight near the Freeport day laborer hiring site two years ago.Henry Martinez-Ramos had been convicted at Nassau County court in May of second-degree murder, tampering with physical evidence and criminal possession of a weapon. A jury found him not guilty of trespassing.Prosecutors said that the 26-year-old stabbed his victim approximately 86 times in his head, face, neck, chest and hand during an altercation along a secluded one-way street on Oct. 20, 2012.Martinez-Ramos then dragged his victim’s body to nearby railroad tracks and dropped multiple railroad ties on it to hide it.Freeport village police arrested him the next day.last_img read more

Continue reading

CEOs: Don’t shy from compensation conversations

first_img continue reading » Credit union CEOs must overcome their reluctance to talk with their boards about compensation philosophy—not just for their own benefit, but for the good of the organization.It’s hard for many CEOs to be advocates for themselves, says Tom Telford, principal/area senior vice president for BFB Gallagher. “It’s just not in your nature to do that.”The main impediment sounds something like this, says Scott Albraccio, executive benefits sales manager for CUNA Mutual Group: “How do I talk about compensation without sounding greedy or self-serving?”The duo provided some pathways to solve that quandary during a presentation at the CUNA CEO Council Conference.First, they presented some common hurdles to healthy communication about executive compensation, with some assistance from the 70 CEOs in attendance at the inaugural event: 10SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

Continue reading