Beef industry

first_imgBeef may be ‘what’s for dinner,’ but it’s also a big deal in Georgia agriculture — injecting about $409 million a year into the state’s economy and providing a livelihood for hundreds of Georgia families. That makes Jacob Seger’s new job as University of Georgia Cooperative Extension beef cattle specialist personal. He’s responsible for helping Georgia’s cattle producers make the most of their herds and for helping beef consumers have a better understanding of their hamburgers and steaks. After several years of drought, hay shortages and now, problems caused by too much rain — he gets questions all the time from farmers trying to improve production efficiency in their herds. “It is my job to provide timely, accurate and comprehensive information to producers and consumers alike. Helping people to translate scientific research into terms that they can understand, and hopefully use, is extremely important, and, to me, typifies the mission of world class land-grant universities like UGA,” Segers said. Segers describes his new position as a dream job. The Georgia native and UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences alum recently concluded a three and a half year stint at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The majority of his UGA work, 85 percent, will focus on keeping county agents, farmers and consumers informed on the most current topics and technologies available to the beef industry. “Regardless of how good our product is or how many advances we make, those advancements are only as good as consumers’ perception of our product,” Segers said. “Hopefully, we’re going to get some stuff done to try to assess consumer perception when they walk into a grocery store. What influences their buying decisions? What’s more important to them? Hopefully, that will give us some information on what we need to focus on in terms of managing our cattle.”Segers grew up in north Georgia, near Jasper. His grandparents raised commercial cows when he was a child. He quickly became involved in 4-H and FFA in middle school and high school. Segers attended UGA and was on the 2007 Livestock Judging Team with coach Jary Douglas. He also became a recruiter for the animal and dairy science department. While in graduate school at UGA, he worked closely with the Georgia Cattleman’s Association. Segers will once again work alongside cattle farmers in what has emerged as a booming business statewide. The new Extension specialist sees his UGA job as a way of paying back those who helped him in his career. “That’s why it’s a dream come true for me. I get to come back and help the people who helped me,” he said.If the state’s industry is to continue to succeed, Segers believes it starts with consumers and discovering what their needs and wants are.He will also teach courses at UGA’s Tifton Campus. Segers will teach Grazing Animal Production and Management when UGA’s spring semester starts in January 2014. He describes the class as a hybrid between beef production and forages.“Extension in Georgia is a model program nationwide, the way that we have our county agents set up and our county delivery system is just excellent,” Segers said. “For me it’s coming home. The opportunity to come back and give back to the program that’s totally responsible for every success that I’ve had, there’s no way I would have been able to stay in animal agriculture or be a part of the things I’ve been a part of had it not been for Extension, 4-H and FFA here in Georgia.”For more information about how UGA Extension helps beef producers maximize the potential of their herds, visit caes.uga.edu/commodities.last_img read more

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EPP: Combining Kidnappings and Crime

first_img However, Lindstrom admitted afterwards that he returned the money to guerrilla emissaries who threatened to kill him and his family. In January 2010, the EPP released another well-known rancher, Fidel Zavala, after holding him captive for 100 days, and getting paid a ransom of $550,000. The cattle breeder is brother to the current Paraguayan Minister of Industry and Commerce, Diego Zavala. Another raid in the same region confiscated written documents from the EPP, verifying its links to the Colombian FARC. Pictures and documents revealed details of trips to Colombia for military training. Lindstrom’s life had already been spared during an extortive kidnapping, between July and September 2008, after paying a ransom of $130,000. The EPP operates in the north, an area that is difficult to reach by land, located between the departments of Concepción and San Pedro, the poorest in the country. The murder of well-known Paraguayan rancher Luis Lindstrom, a cattle breeder and exporter killed by the self-defined Paraguayan People’s Army or EPP for its Spanish name, on May 31, stirred the country, the first in the Atlantic region to record an armed insurgency in decades. Following a raid on a house owned by EPP leader Alejandro Ramos, the specialized police recovered part of the money. center_img The mysterious Marxist-Leninist leaning group, proven to have ties to the Colombian FARC, is estimated to have no more than thirty members and concentrates its terrorist activity on kidnappings, crimes and attacks on police stations. EPP members “were trained in Colombia and now they are putting into practice everything they learned,” said Sandra Quiñonez, specialized prosecutor in counter insurgency. A column of the criminal organization shot Lindstrom seven times with automatic weapons. His body was discovered next to his vehicle, possibly after having tried to escape the ambush by foot. In March 2008, the group broke into the ranch of a Brazilian national and destroyed his agricultural machinery, valued at $400,000. By Dialogo June 04, 2013last_img read more

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Higher Ed Lobby Quietly Joins For-Profit Schools to Roll Back Tighter Rules

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York The Obama administration is set to achieve one of its top domestic policy goals after years of wrangling. For-profit colleges, which receive tens of billions of dollars in U.S. grants and loans yet often leave their students with little beyond crushing debt, will need to meet new standards or risk losing taxpayer dollars.But as the July 1 deadline approaches, the troubled industry has been mounting a last-ditch effort to avert or roll back the new rules. And suddenly it’s getting a lift from a set of unlikely allies: traditional colleges and universities.For years, the higher education establishment has viewed the for-profit education business as both a rival and an unsavory relation — the cousin with the rap sheet who seeks a cut of the family inheritance. Yet, in a striking but little-noticed shift, nearly all of the college establishment’s representatives in Washington are siding with for-profit colleges in opposing the government’s crackdown.Most of the traditional higher education lobbying groups signed onto a recent letter to Congress stating their support for Republican legislation that would block the new restrictions on for-profit colleges, as well as undo or weaken other accountability rules for colleges. And a new report on higher education regulation commissioned by the Senate and overseen by the American Council on Education, the leading lobby group for traditional schools, slammed the rules on for-profit colleges as part of a broader critique of the administration’s approach.The emerging alliance points to a new calculation by the higher education lobby. By throwing in with the for-profits, traditional schools might be able to capitalize on the Republicans’ current control of Congress in order to limit the government’s reach into their own campuses. Among other things, colleges and universities would like to block the proposed new federal ratings system designed to help families choose institutions based on how many of their students graduate and where they get jobs.This bid for GOP favor may seem counter-intuitive, given that many conservatives view academia as a bastion of pampered liberalism. In reality, the higher education lobby represents an industry as self-interested as any other—the two largest of its many trade groups reported spending $500,000 on federal lobbying last year—and it sees an opportunity in the de-regulatory instincts of the Republican majority.The gambit underscores one of the under-appreciated truths about lobbying in Washington in an era of divided government: Special interests are often as interested in preserving a favorable status quo as they are in getting government to take an action to their benefit. To that end, gridlock can be a feature to be encouraged, not something to expunge.At stake in this case is the roughly $150 billion that the federal government shovels annually into colleges and universities in the form of Pell grants and subsidized loans for students. Current and former higher education regulators say the federal government is obliged to assure that taxpayers are getting results for that spending.“The higher ed lobby doesn’t want any accountability—they want money, and they want money without limitations, without restrictions, without accountability to anybody outside the academy,” said David Bergeron, who served as Obama’s acting assistant secretary for postsecondary education before joining the Center for American Progress, a Democratic think tank that’s close to the administration.“What that has led to is very poor performance by our institutions—graduation rates are alarmingly low, and employers are becoming increasingly concerned that the employees they’re hiring out of the academy don’t have the knowledge and skills they require,” Bergeron said.The colleges say the administration has gone far beyond what’s necessary.“This is not about getting rid of regulation—it’s about making regulation more rational and relevant,” said University System of Maryland Chancellor William E. “Brit” Kirwan, who co-chaired the recent Senate task force. “The Department of Education has developed an insatiable appetite for expanding regulation.”For most of Obama’s tenure, the department’s top regulatory priority has been reining in abuses by the for-profit sector, which as of 2012 accounted for only 13 percent of the nation’s college enrollment, but 47 percent of the defaults on student loans.A 2012 Senate report found that taxpayers spent $32 billion in the prior year on companies operating for-profit colleges—which rely almost entirely on federal student aid for revenues—and that most of their students left without a degree, half within four months. The report found that at the 30 companies studied, the average CEO pay was $7.3 million, and that 22.4 percent of revenue went to marketing and recruiting, 19.4 percent to profits, and only 17.7 percent to instruction.A 2010 Government Accountability Office report found that four colleges “encouraged fraudulent practices” in meetings with undercover investigators posing as prospective students. All 15 colleges that were investigated, including industry leaders such as the University of Phoenix and Kaplan Inc., “made deceptive or otherwise questionable statements.”A Bloomberg investigation that year also found that for-profit colleges were being particularly aggressive in recruiting military veterans so they could capitalize on increased funding available under the GI Bill. Late last year, federal and state authorities in Florida charged that a for-profit chain there was hiring exotic dancers to recruit students.In 2011, the administration moved to assure that for-profit colleges were actually giving students the skills they were promised so they could land jobs and repay their loans. The so-called “gainful employment” rules cut off federal aid for programs that fell below certain thresholds for how students were keeping up with payments and how their earnings compared with the debt they’d accumulated.The for-profit college industry challenged the regulations in court, with vocal backing from congressional Republicans and conservatives. In 2012, a federal judge struck down the threshold on loan repayment rates as overly arbitrary. Last October, the education department released the revised rules, built around two different measures of debt-to-earnings loads for graduates. The industry is challenging them in court as well.Early on, the traditional higher education lobby generally backed the administration. When the revised regulations came out last fall, Terry Hartle, chief lobbyist for the American Council on Education, which represents 1,700 schools from Abilene Christian University to Yale, called them “an honest effort by the department to find an appropriate balance.”“These issues are complicated,” Hartle added, “and they’re trying to get it right.”Then the Republicans took control of the Senate and the signals changed.In February, all major higher education lobbying groups but one—the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities—sent a letter backing the “Supporting Academic Freedom Through Regulatory Relief Act,” authored by Rep. John Kline of Minnesota and Rep. Virginia Foxx of North Carolina, the Republicans who chair, respectively, the education committee and the higher education subcommittee. The bill, which has a counterpart in the Senate, would bar the regulations on the for-profit institutions, among other regulatory rollbacks.The shift prompted cheers from the for-profits, which have seen their enrollment fall amid all the bad publicity for the industry and the threat of tougher oversight. One major chain, Corinthian Colleges, has been shut down entirely.“We welcome anybody that’s interested in stopping over-burdensome regulations that are not helping students,” said Noah Black, a spokesman for the Association of Private Sector Colleges and Universities, which records show spent $650,000 on federal lobbying last year. “We’re always happy when people agree with us.”The traditional higher education lobby said their groups signed onto the letter because the revised regulations are both too weak to root out the most problematic for-profit colleges and too nettlesome for other institutions that will also have to comply. To address the for-profit industry’s charge that it is being singled out, the regulations also apply to non-degree programs at community colleges and traditional universities, which have been expanding such offerings amid the rise in online learning and career certification courses. As such, the new regulations drew criticism.“They’re extremely expensive, utterly pointless, and disgracefully ineffective,” said Barmak Nassirian, chief lobbyist for the American Association of State Colleges and Universities. “Virtually all of the worst actors will pass them with flying colors.”Sarah Flanagan, his counterpart at the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities, said the same: “We ended up with this complex reporting requirement with no teeth in it. We said we’d support them if they had teeth in it.”The administration rejects this assessment, noting that the revised regulations are expected to disqualify seven times more programs than the original ones did and are already driving for-profits to close their most egregious programs.“The rule will make a huge difference for the more than 800,000 students enrolled in the worst programs, who otherwise face unaffordable debts and defaults with life-changing consequences,” said James Kvaal, deputy director of the White House’s Domestic Policy Council.Black, the for-profit association spokesman, said the revised regulations are unquestionably tougher in how they determine whether a program is falling short. “You can’t make the case that this one is weaker” than the initial regulation supported by much of the traditional college lobby, he said.The more likely motivation for the traditional schools is that it gives the lobby strength in numbers in challenging the administration’s other regulatory actions, said Amy Laitinen, a former higher education adviser in the Obama administration who is now at the New America Foundation. Among other things the traditional college groups are upset about are the tightened standards for credit hours, which determine how much student aid the U.S. awards to students. The Department of Education’s inspector general found that accreditors were allowing colleges to inflate credit hours, but the higher education lobby said the tightened standards will stifle distance-learning courses.Traditional universities are also unhappy with the administration’s proposed new rules for assessing teacher-preparation programs. Above all, they are resistant to the administration’s plan for a new ratings system for colleges to supplement the oft-criticized U.S. News rankings.University officials—led by private colleges, which are especially opposed to the administration’s push for greater accountability and transparency—say the available data aren’t good enough to produce reliable rankings. At the same time, many of them have lobbied against a proposal to improve student data.It is doubtful whether the Kline-Foxx deregulatory bill could advance past a Democratic filibuster in the Senate, much less get Obama’s approval, unless it were attached to other must-pass legislation. For now, it is serving as a stand-in for the real battle, the upcoming reauthorization of the 1965 Higher Education Act, which was last updated in 2008. Sen. Lamar Alexander, the Tennessee Republican and chairman of the education committee, is expected to take that up soon, and the task force report commissioned by the committee was the first step in that process.Alexander has praised the task force report. The over-regulation of colleges, he said at a hearing on the report, represents “sloppy, inefficient governing that wastes money, hurts students, discourages productivity and impedes research.”This gives the higher education lobby hope that he’ll push to include many of its deregulatory proposals in the reauthorizing bill. But consumer advocates say the report should be taken with a dose of skepticism, given that the task force was picked entirely by the higher education lobby’s biggest group, with no advocates for taxpayers or students represented.“It should surprise no one that regulated entities want fewer regulations and strings attached to the funds they receive,” said Pauline Abernathy, of the Institute for College Access and Success.At least one university president is chiming in against the higher education lobby’s new turn. Louisiana State University Chancellor F. King Alexander said the lobby’s complaints of over-regulation ring hollow. “Naturally, [the lobby groups] love the idea of telling the federal government to get your hands off the money and don’t tell us what to do with it—just put it on the stump and leave,” he said.But in the case of the for-profit regulations, this approach is short-sighted, Alexander said. The more that fly-by-night for-profit programs soak up federal aid dollars, the less that is left for students at traditional colleges, and the more calls there will be to reduce funding for student aid, he said.“We’re pouring money into places no one’s ever heard of before,” Alexander said. “We’re not going to have any more federal aid unless we have a better handle on who’s getting it.”Related stories: For more coverage of politics and lobbying, read ProPublica’s previous reporting on the rising influence of single donors, an imploding super PAC and gaps in oversight.ProPublica is a Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative newsroom. Sign up for their newsletter.last_img read more

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Former Okocha coach lists Liverpool,Man City as Premier League’s best long-ball teams

first_img Loading… He believes that English football’s top pair show the kind of versatility that others lack and that Jurgen Klopp and Pep Guardiola have actually embraced a need to mix up play. But Allardyce, 65, feels that the duo don’t get the credit they deserve for their ability to go long, because admitting you’re happy to go direct is now ‘frowned upon’. Read Also:Allardyce defends Pickford after street fight “Too many players are giving the ball away in their own half,” insists Allardyce. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 And Manchester City goalkeeper Ederson is the standout player when it comes to going direct. That’s according to Sam Allardyce, the former England manager.Advertisement Promoted ContentA Hurricane Can Be As Powerful As 10 Atomic Bombs8 Addictive And Fun Coffee Facts6 TV Shows That Got Better After A Major Character Had LeftWhy Go Veg? 7 Reasons To Do ThisFantastic-Looking (and Probably Delicious) Bread Art10 Hyper-Realistic 3D Street Art By OdeithBest & Worst Celebrity Endorsed Games Ever Made7 Things That Actually Ruin Your PhoneTop 10 Most Romantic Nations In The WorldWhat Happens When You Eat Eggs Every Single Day?Birds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For Them8 Things That Will Happen If An Asteroid Hits Earth Liverpool are running away with the Premier League this term, and ex-England and Austin Jay Jay Okocha boss, Allardyce believes their ability to go long is another reason for their success.last_img read more

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Real Madrid set to end three-year La Liga title against Villarreal

first_imgReal Madrid will be crowned La Liga champions tonight if they defeat Villarreal or if Barcelona fail to beat Osasuna. It will be Madrid’s first league title since 2017 and only their second in the past eight seasons, with their El Clasico rivals Barcelona dominating in recent times with eight wins in their last 11. Loading… Read Also: Adebayo Akinfenwa gets invite to Liverpool victory parade Each of the main Catalan sports newspapers go for the same headline – ‘Match Ball’ – to represent how this is a decisive moment in the campaign when Madrid can end the title race beyond any doubt. Indeed, Mundo Deportivo argue that whilst team awards are now beyond Barcelona in La Liga – Lionel Messi will still be gunning for the Pichichi award, as he leads Karim Benzema by three goals in the leading goalscoring charts going into the final two rounds of action. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Unsurprisingly, the club’s imminent title dominates the front pages of Thursday’s Spanish sports papers, with Madrid-based Marca focusing on how Barcelona must not only win their home clash against Osasuna but also ‘pray’ that Los Blancos slip up against the Yellow Submarine.Advertisement Promoted ContentA Runner Uses Strava App To Create Amazing Pieces Of Running Art8 Scenes That Prove TV Has Gone Too FarLook Up At The Most Fascinated Ceilings In The WorldBirds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For ThemCouples Who Celebrated Their Union In A Unique, Unforgettable WayThis Guy Photoshopped Himself Into Celeb Pics And It’s HystericalWho’s The Best Car Manufacturer Of All Time?10 Risky Jobs Some Women DoWhat Happens To Your Brain When You Play Too Much Video Games?Who Is The Most Powerful Woman On Earth?The Models Of Paintings Whom The Artists Were Madly In Love WithThe Best Cars Of All Timelast_img read more

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NBA Finals highlight false narratives

first_imgPhoto via Creative Commons (Wikipedia)It’s funny how narrative works in sports. Win a championship and you’re a legend. Lose one and you’re a choker.At least that’s how it is in today’s social media age. Look at LeBron James. He was the ultimate choke artist in Cleveland until he bolted for Miami and became the biggest traitor since Benedict Arnold. He then won two championships and got rid of the “choke artist” title before returning to Cleveland, and on Sunday he became the “hometown hero” once again by leading his Cavaliers to a championship, the city’s first since 1964.The false narratives have followed James like none other throughout his 13-year career. He’s the next Michael Jordan. He can’t deliver in the clutch. He’ll never win a championship in Cleveland. He needs two superstars around him to win a ring. He’s arrogant, selfish, not a team player, soft, a crybaby and on the wrong side of 30.And in a span of two weeks, he took all of those scorching hot takes and extinguished them for good with an NBA Finals performance for the ages. With his team down 3-1 in the series, he scored 41 points in back-to-back elimination games and then poured in a triple-double — 27 points, 11 rebounds and 11 assists — in a Game 7 win on the road, beating a Warriors team that hadn’t lost three straight games since 2013 and had lost four times at home all season. With the game tied late, his chase down block on Andre Iguodala — taking away a sure layup — that led to Kyrie Irving’s go-ahead 3-pointer is one of the greatest championship-defining moments you will ever see.In these two weeks, James has taken his legacy and raised it higher than the sky, re-established himself as the best player in the league and shown that the king is not dead — he is very much alive and still doing incredible, non-human, groundbreaking basketball things.As high as James is flying right now, the Warriors have gone on a free-fall twice the distance. As someone who has followed the Warriors since I knew what basketball was, to see the narrative around this team right now is very conflicting and painful. I will spare you the details of the horrid basketball that I watched growing up, but if you told me before 2012 they would make the playoffs four straight years, much less two consecutive Finals, I would’ve laughed.But 2015 was the year they burst onto the scene as the cool new toy and this season was supposed to prove they were worthy of legendary status. And everything was going so well. They broke the 1995-1996 Chicago Bulls’ regular-season wins record with 73, a feat that may never be touched again.I was lucky enough to cover one of their games and attend two more as a fan, and it was like the circus coming to town every night. Crowds would gather just to watch Stephen Curry’s pre-game warm-up routine. It was like the intro to the real show, and boy was it a show. The Splash Brothers would celebrate 3-pointers prematurely and you couldn’t do anything about it because they went in. Draymond Green would taunt and trash talk and get under your skin and you couldn’t respond because his team was running circles around yours.By the end, after 48 minutes of a barrage of 3-pointers and relentless Harlem Globetrotter-like ball movement, the question for a team that started the season 24-0 and set nearly every record in the books was not whether they would win, but how much they would win by. They were arrogant because they could be, and they had everyone convinced they were invincible.Until they weren’t. Until the Oklahoma City Thunder had them down 3-1 in the conference finals and it took Klay Thompson’s heroics to raise them back from the dead. Suddenly, they were beatable. And then, inexplicably, they blew a 3-1 series lead in the Finals, the first team ever to do so. Quite literally, the Warriors are the best team in NBA history to not win a championship, a dubious honor that just screams, “choke artists.”And with it come all the narratives, true or untrue. The Warriors are so overrated. Biggest choke job ever. Last season was a fluke. Curry is soft, weak and undeserving of a unanimous MVP award. Winning 73 games means nothing. Charles Barkley was right: jump-shooting teams can’t win.I could go on — Twitter experts are great. But the bottom line is that narratives are dumb. If James doesn’t block that layup and if Irving misses that 3-pointer, we’re talking about how James is still a choker and will never end Cleveland’s championship curse and dubbing the Warriors as the greatest team of all time.It is entirely possible to believe that the Warriors had an incredible season while James played out of his mind and the Cavs pulled off an upset for the ages. But that would be too logical for social media, where takes must be made instantly and James fluctuates between “hero” and “choker” faster than the speed of light. I can’t wait for these two teams to meet again in next year’s Finals and for more narratives to come.Eric He is a rising sophomore majoring in print and digital journalism. His column,  “Grinding Gears,” runs Wednesdays.last_img read more

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SO YOU FANCY YOURSELF AS A PHOTOGRAPHER?

first_imgLetterkenny Photographic Club LKFoto starts back for its 6th year on Monday 21st Sep in the Regional Cultural Centre (RCC), Letterkenny, after a short summer break.This is an open night for anyone interested in photography and is considering joining the club. This year we already have a full programme planned, including outings, guest photographers and monthly themed competitions. The club plan to run free introduction courses for all beginner photographers who wish to join the club.There will also be a series of tutorials on advanced photographic techniques for the seasoned members. The club run monthly themed competitions, hosted on the club’s Picturk website. The winners each month go forward to our Exhibition The club meets every 2nd Monday evening at the RCC (behind the Grianan theatre) from 7:00 to 9:00. Membership is €30 per annum.The club has just launched a new website at http://lkfoto.ie/ where you will find a membership form and further details about the club.The club is open to all. Anyone interested in joining can come along any evening or contact the club by emailing our PRO Shane at [email protected] or Ciaran at [email protected] or ring Ciaran at 0862072798 or Like us on Facebook to get regular updates on upcoming events.SO YOU FANCY YOURSELF AS A PHOTOGRAPHER? was last modified: September 18th, 2015 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Letterkenny Camera Clublast_img read more

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Now, NCP leader Ranjitsinh Mohite-Patil set to join BJP

first_imgThe rivalry within the Nationalist Congress Party (NCP) between the Pawars and the Mohite-Patils over the Madha Lok Sabha constituency in Solapur came to a head on Tuesday with Ranjitsinh Mohite-Patil, son of NCP MP Vijayshinh Mohite-Patil, set to join the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP).Sources said, Mr. Ranjitsinh, who wasn’t given a ticket by the NCP from Madha, is expected to formally enter the BJP fold on Wednesday. Ranjitsinh allegedly secretly met Chief Minister Devendra Fadnavis and BJP leader Girish Mahajan in Mumbai late on Monday. He had also held parleys with Mr. Mahajan on the day Sujay Vikhe-Patil, son of Congressman Radhakrishna Vikhe-Patil, had joined the BJP.Mr. Ranjitsinh had earlier, in a Facebook post, expressed anguish at failing to secure candidature from Madha and sought ‘guidance’ from supporters to decide on future action. “Your decision will be my decision, tell me what to do… Ought we merely to sit silent, keep tolerating or should we hit back for the sake of our future, progress and development?” he asked, calling for a meeting of his supporters.In a show of strength, the father and son presided over a massive gathering of their supporters outside their residence in Akluj, Solapur. Mr. Mohite-Patil’s supporters lashed out against the allegedly “high-handed” treatment meted to the MP and his son by the NCP top brass. “While Parth Pawar [NCP leader and former Deputy CM Ajit Pawar’s son] and MP Udayanraje Bhosale have been given tickets for the Maval and Satara Lok Sabha constituencies respectively, why have the Mohite-Patils been sidelined?” asked a supporter.“Despite having a prominent role in expanding the NCP base, the Mohite-Patils have not been given their due…let Mr. Ranjitsinh join the BJP, we stand by him,” said another supporter.Mr. Mohite-Patil, a prominent sugar baron and an oft-elected MLA (from Malshiras) who had also served as a Deputy CM, was among the few who held his own against the Modi ‘wave’ in the 2014 general election.On March 11, after Mr. Pawar announced that he would not contest from Madha, it was expected that the ticket would be given to Mr. Mohite-Patil or his son. However, no candidate for Madha has been declared in the two lists announced by the NCP so far, arousing suspicion that the Mohite-Patils would be sidelined.Mr. Ajit has been Mr. Ranjitsinh’s long-time adversary. This dates back to the founding of the NCP in 1999, when Ranjitsinh was the youth wing president of the fledgling NCP.According to Mr. Mohite-Patil’s supporters, Mr. Ajit has always viewed Mr. Ranjitsinh as a threat and tried to drive him out of the political arena. As a result, Mr. Ranjitsinh, a former Rajya Sabha MP, has been sidelined by the NCP brass for nearly a decade.Another powerful faction in Solapur, NCP legislator from Madha Assembly constituency Babanrao Shinde and his brother Sanjaymama Shinde, are also the Mohite-Patils’ rivals.Observers say with many rival factions, it was a only a matter of time before the powerful, but increasingly isolated Mohite-Patils, joined the ruling party.Mr. Ajit’s loyalists, on the other hand, said that Mr. Ranjitsinh’s defection to the BJP will have minimal impact on the NCP in Madha. “Over some years, Mr. Mohite-Patil’s hold over his constituency has weakened. So, we are not unduly worried if his son joins the BJP,” said an NCP leader.last_img read more

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Stephen Curry shatters hotel table after golf blunder

first_imgBrace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC The Warriors were were in Washington, where they took selected kids to an African-American history museum in lieu of the usual White House visit and defeated the Wizards, 109-101, last Thursday.Curry is an avid golfer and has played against pros. LATEST STORIES Pussycat Dolls set for reunion tour after 10-year hiatus Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Families in US enclave in north Mexico hold sad Thanksgiving LOOK: Iya Villania meets ‘Jumanji: The Next Level’ cast in Mexico John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding MOST READ “When you feel like you’re on the @pgatour so you gotta get some wings going in the hotel room,” Curry said in Instagram post.center_img Google honors food scientist, banana ketchup inventor and war hero Maria Orosa Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Most of the time  Stephen Curry hits threes, other times he hits the hotel glass table.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSLillard, Anthony lead Blazers over ThunderSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutThe Golden State star guard on Thursday posted a photo of shattered glass all over his hotel room, which was a result of an accident while he was working on his golf swing.ADVERTISEMENT Read Next AFP official booed out of forum Phoenix spoils Romeo’s return, keeps quarterfinal hopes alive Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university PLAY LIST 01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City View commentslast_img read more

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Gymnastics chief sees ‘2 or 3 more’ gold medals

first_imgNATO’s aging eye in the sky to get a last overhaul Reyland Capellan (left) and Kaitlin de Guzman (right) celebrate with Gymnastics Association of the Philippines and chief of mission Cynthia Carrion after winning two gold medals in the gymnastics competition of the 29th Southeast Asian Games. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO/SEA GAMES POOLKUALA LUMPUR — With two golds in the bag, gymnastics chief Cynthia Carrion said the Philippines can still expect two to three more triumphs in the next few days.Carrion, who is also the chief of mission, said she is looking at a few more wins in individual and team events in the sport being held at MITEC Hall 9.ADVERTISEMENT READ: Young gymnast captures PH’s fifth gold medalCapellan will still see action in vault, while the 17-year-old De Guzman will vie for golds in her favorite events, floor exercise and balance beam.“I hope the other sports follow suit,” said Carrion who is also counting on team events.RELATED VIDEOGymnast captures Philippines’ 4th gold in SEA Games2.4K viewsSportsVentuno Web Player 4.51 Trump signs bills in support of Hong Kong protesters Celebrity chef Gary Rhodes dies at 59 with wife by his side READ: Gymnast captures Philippines’ 4th gold in SEA GamesGymnastics has 20 golds at stake in both rhythmic and artistic disciplines, which can turn in a gold mine that Team Philippines needs.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games openingIncidentally, it was Carrion, in her capacity as chief delegate, who forecasted a 50-gold turnout for the PH contingent.Gold medalists Reyland Capellan in men’s artistic floor exercise and Kaitlin de Guzman in uneven bars kept the country’s campaign afloat Tuesday morning. MOST READ LATEST STORIES Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ ADVERTISEMENT Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next 3 Filipino boxers in SEA Games finals; Suarez crashes Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim Robredo should’ve resigned as drug czar after lack of trust issue – Panelo Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Pagasa: Storm intensifies as it nears PAR Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ View comments Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. last_img read more

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