See Kristin Scott Thomas as the Queen in London’s The Audience

first_img View Comments Before original West End star Helen Mirren hops the pond to play Elizabeth II in The Audience on Broadway, she’s passing the London crown to Kristin Scott Thomas! A new version of Peter Morgan’s The Audience will begin performances April 21, 2015 at the Apollo Theatre, directed by Stephen Daldry. The acclaimed play imagines a series of pivotal meetings between the Queen and her 12 Prime Ministers. Check out this sneak peek photo of Thomas in her royal robes, then see The Audience in the West End…and on Broadway!last_img read more

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Auction set for epic Gold Coast mansion once listed for $45m

first_img More from news02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa7 hours ago02:37Gold Coast property: Sovereign Islands mega mansion hits market with $16m price tag1 day agoRiccardo Rizzi took on the challenge of completing the build. Picture Mike BatterhamNo expense has been spared by Mr Rizzi who has risen to the challenge of bringing the vision for a grand Mediterranean masterpiece to fruition.The six-bedroom pad has a billiard room, cinema, wine cellar, 25m outdoor pool, a gymnasium with spa, chiller pool, steam room and sauna.Mr Mian said it was impossible to put a price on the property, taking into account the value of land, years of trade labour and materials imported from around the globe. MORE: Hollywood Hills comes to Oxenford The Mediterranean masterpiece will go to auction on October 17.Amir Mian, principal of Amir Prestige, said it was the first time a property of this calibre would go under the hammer on the Gold Coast. “The final touches were made two weeks ago so the home will go to auction as new,” he said. “The strength of the prestige market on the Gold Coast right now is the best it could be.“There has never been a better time to put a property of this standing to auction.” Top 10 eye-popping Gold Coast houses Manpower founder lists Broadbeach Waters mansion The property boasts 106m of water frontage on the best five north-facing blocks on Sovereign Islands.center_img The unfinished mansion in 2013. Picture: Luke MarsdenThe previous owners, accountant Clare Marks and her lawyer husband Scott Tyne, are reported to have outlaid $21.44 million on the initial construction and four blocks of land.Perth-based Mr Rizzi later acquired an adjoining 777 sqm block for $1.2 million, increasing the total holding to 4254 sqm. A 4m high, 1500kg bronze statue is among the more ostentatious features.The auction campaign is expected to attract worldwide interest, with overseas residents without an Australian visa eligible to buy. “The campaign will target buyers Australia wide as well as China, Hong Kong and Singapore,” said Mr Mian. “There are plenty of billionaires who are looking through a post-pandemic lens and seeing the Gold Coast as a safe place to be.” Amir Mian, principal of Amir Prestige, with sales agent Faith Liu. Picture: Tertius PickardThe auction date comes hot on the heels of Mr Mian’s $22.5 million sale on 187-191 Hedges Ave, Mermaid Beach last month, the latest in a string of record real estate deals.The Sovereign Islands estate was put to market with a $45 million price tag a year ago in a move designed to “test the waters” while construction continued. The property famously sold in an unfinished state to civil engineer Riccardo Rizzi for $5.3 million at a mortgagee auction in 2013. The extraordinary estate at 26-34 Knightsbridge Parade East, Sovereign Islands.They say Rome wasn’t built in a day and nor was the Gold Coast’s most extravagant house. The final touches on a grand Sovereign Islands trophy mansion – previously listed with a price tag of $45 million – have been made more than a decade after work first began.Built across five north-facing waterfront blocks on Knightsbridge Parade East, the keys to the completed mansion are up for grabs with an auction set down for October 17.last_img read more

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Microsoft Windows in Zulu

first_img20 April 2006Many South Africans will soon be able to use a computer in their home language for the first time.Microsoft released this week an isiZulu version of their most popular product, Windows XP, with a Setswana version promised for May and Afrikaans to come in June.The programme will translate all of Windows’ menus, help files and error messages, almost 400 000 words and phrases in total.Some of South Africa’s seven other official languages may arrive when Microsoft release their successor to XP, Windows Vista, expected sometime in 2007.‘Linguistically correct’The project has taken almost two years, much longer than the company originally expected, according to Microsoft South Africa MD Gordon Frazer.“We’re pretty excited about it,” Frazer told Business Day. “It’s something we have been working on for some time, in partnership with a lot of people because we had to deliver linguistically correct versions.”During the development of the language packs, Microsoft consulted the Pan South African Language Board, universities, local communities and government departments.“We wanted to get consensus on the terms and terminology to protect the integrity of the languages,” Frazer said. “We didn’t just want to say ‘i-this’ and ‘i-that’”.For some terms, however, there just wasn’t a suitable translation available, such as i-Internet, for example.First-time usersFrazer believes that it is first-time users, who are daunted by computers and do not speak English as their first language, who will derive the most value from the language packs.“I think we will see quite a big take-up in schools and in the 50 community computer centres we sponsor where English is an issue.”The popular open source office suite, OpenOffice.org was released in all 11 South African languages by NGO translate.org.za in 2005.Various versions of Microsoft’s Windows operating system are used by more than 90% of all computer users, and for them this will be the first time that they will be able to do everything in their home language.The isiZulu Interface pack is available for download at Microsoft.com. Microsoft say that the programme will also be distrubuted on CD, for those without internet access.SouthAfrica.info reporter Want to use this article in your publication or on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

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Play Your Part episode 24: Synopsis

first_imgThe next episode of the Play Your Part Television Series will air on Saturday, 3 March 2018 on SABC 2 at 18h00. Episode 24 is aligned to the pillars of health and education of the National Development Plan 2030. It features Iris Cupido, CEO of SABC Foundation and Naniki Seboni from Cancervive.Iris CupidoIris Cupido talks to us about the work that the SABC Foundation is doing on five developmental focus areas: orphaned and vulnerable children, education and skills development, people with disability, NGO support and Health.Naniki SeboniCancervive is a beneficiary of the SABC Foundation. We caught up with Naniki Seboni, a cancer warrior as she shares her inspiring story with us.Play Your Part is broadcast at 18:00 on every Saturday on SABC 2.Tell us how you Play Your Part through our social media channels:Follow Play Your Part on Twitter: @PlayYourPartSALike us on Facebook: Play Your PartWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

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Changing climate highlighted at Conservation Tillage and Technology Conference

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Increased rainfall in larger doses and warming temperatures in the future are likely, building on trends that have already been seen in Ohio.The first day of the Conservation Tillage and Technology Conference included many presentations including nutrient management, crop production, water quality, technology and innovation during the event at Ohio Northern University in Ada. The role of the changing climate cannot be ignored inAaron Wilson, climate specialist for Ohio State University Extensionagriculture’s ongoing challenges with nutrient management and water quality.“In Ohio we are seeing temperature changes and precipitation changes and some of the challenges that come with that,” said Aaron Wilson, climate specialist for Ohio State University Extension, at the Conservation Tillage and Technology Conference in Ada. “From a climate standpoint we are warming. Our winters are warming faster than our summers, though our warmest maximum summer temperatures have actually gone down compared to the early 20th Century.”The warmer temperatures can have implications for crops and livestock.“On the livestock issue, the one thing we have seen in the summer is that we have warmer nights and longer periods of warmer temperatures that can really stress livestock,” Wilson said.In terms of precipitation, Ohio receives 10% more rain per year, on average, than in the 20th century. Ohio’s current annual average is 42 inches, up 3 inches from the 39-inch average in the 20th century, Wilson said. Those additional 3 inches aren’t spread across the entire year. Instead the bulk of Ohio’s rain is falling in intense rain events, followed by an increase in consecutive dry days, Wilson said.“On the precipitation side we are seeing extreme rain events increasing in number. We are seeing issues then with runoff, soil erosion and nutrient loss across the state,” he said. “And it is very difficult to forecast the extreme precipitation events. When you are trying to make sound management decisions on your farm this is a big challenge. By their nature we know these rain events are highly variable.”The most significant seasonal increase in rainfall for Ohio has been in the autumn months, though springs are also wetter.“Soil erosion compaction, soil health, organic matter, and runoff are all being impacted by precipitation,” Wilson said. “Also water availability throughout the year can affect practices like double-cropping, crop rotations, and other management. We need to think about these things to be prepared for the changes we are going to see.”Extreme rain events in which more than 2 inches fall during a rainstorm have increased by 30% in Ohio since the late 1990s, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.“Weather patterns have changed so we can’t just take it for granted that what we did in the past will work well now and into the future,” Wilson said. “The more we understand how our weather is changing, the better we can be about adapting to these changes and making decisions now and into the future in agriculture.”For more information about the conference, visit: fabe.osu.edu/CTCon.last_img read more

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Gas vs. Electric for Heating, Cooking, and Hot Water

first_imgHow the GBA Site Displays Readers’ NamesNatural Gas Pipelines Are LeakingAll About Radiant FloorsThe Pretty Good HouseThe Hazards of Cooking With GasAn Induction Cooktop for Our KitchenAn Introduction to Photovoltaic SystemsSolar Thermal Is Really, Really Dead Our expert’s opinionHere’s what Peter Yost, GBA’s technical director, has to say:I get pretty nervous when I hear about folks using unvented gas appliances inside an airtight or “pretty airtight” home during emergencies when there is no electricity. We make three things when we burn fossil fuels, if we are lucky enough to combust them perfectly: heat, CO2, and moisture. The latter two byproducts can be pollutants if we don’t have ventilation to dilute them or exhaust them.And given the efficiency limitations of atmospherically vented gas water heaters, it’s hard for me to imagine their fit in a “Pretty Good House.” So if you are using a gas DHW appliance, it is either power-vented, direct-vent, or sealed combustion, each of which needs electricity to work in an emergency. [Editor’s note: See further discussion of this issue in Comments #4 and #7, below.]I think one of the greatest leaps forward in the last ten years has been how PV has moved residential high performance largely to a single integrated power source for all loads and introducing us to a “net” thinking about total load: electricity. RELATED ARTICLES That said, natural gas has one advantage over electricity when used for heat, Holladay says. It’s often cheaper on a BTU basis.But there are a number of disadvantages to using gas. Not only does it contribute to global warming, but natural gas pipelines also leak methane, a powerful global warming gas. Gas utilities charge a minimum monthly fee, even when no gas is being used. And, Holladay says, gas-burning appliances installed inside a home’s thermal envelope may raise concerns about backdrafting and indoor air quality.It’s not that cut and dried, Segal says: “It seems to me, there are pro and cons besides the obvious environmental, those being the efficiency, the economics and maybe the logistics. By logistics I mean simplicity and local availability of install and maintenance (should my spouse go before me, I am in trouble!) and the ability to lock and leave allowing us to go on vacation etc.” Think twice about radiant-floor heatSegal has specifically mentioned in-floor radiant heat, but rather than supply the system with hot water from a gas or electric boiler, Dana Dorsett suggests investing that money in photovoltaic (PV) panels.“A 2,000-[square foot] Pretty Good House in sunny high-altitude Zone 6B Colorado can probably hit net zero energy with a PV array that fits on the house if the heating system is a combination of inexpensive electric mesh radiant floor (for maximal cush-factor) running off a floor thermostat, and a cold climate minisplit or two for maintaining the room temperature(s),” Dorsett says.Even if Segal doesn’t think she’ll need mechanical cooling in a house built at an altitude of 7,000 feet, any minisplit that heats also can cool. “Whether you need to run it in that mode or not, it’s there,” he says.“In a well-designed, solar-tempered Pretty Good House, you may find there will be days when some amount of active cooling is useful, though nighttime ventilation strategies usually work just fine in your area,” Dorsett adds.“Cheap low-voltage mesh radiant floors can still be a nice comfort feature in places that might matter (say, in bathrooms). When used judiciously it won’t impinge heavily on the average heating efficiency of a house heated with minisplits.”Dorsett suggests that Segal start with accurate heat load calculations from an engineer or RESNET rater (not your average heating contractor) so the minisplit can be sized properly, adding, “Then, at 7,000 feet it’s important to do the homework on capacity derating for altitude on the minisplits. Some minisplit installers understand it, but (sadly) most won’t have more than a clue (assuming they’re even aware of the issue at all.)” A plus for natural gasAlthough there are good reasons not to choose natural gas, there’s also a good argument in its favor, says Andrew Bater.“In times of disaster, perhaps with the exception of earthquakes and extreme flooding, natural gas infrastructure may be up and running while other above-ground electric utilities are out of service,” Bater writes. “For example, after Hurricane Sandy where we used to live in New Jersey we had no electricity for a number of days, except what we provided with our own small generator. However, we had town-provided water and natural gas. Our old pilot-driven water heater kept on cranking along; it was pretty nice.”With that in mind, Bater installed a propane range when he built an energy-efficient home a few years ago. The cooks in Bater’s family preferred gas, and they know the range will work when the power goes out.“Comforting to know that we can make a bowl of soup if all else fails,” he said.center_img Lydia Segal is planning a 2,000-square foot house in Colorado (Climate Zone 6B), and aiming for “Pretty Good House” performance. Among the many questions she’s trying to answer is whether electricity or natural gas is the best choice for heating, domestic hot water, and cooking.She’s lucky enough to have both a reliable electricity grid and easy access to natural gas in the small community where she lives. So the practicalities of delivery are not really a concern.“We are weighing the pros and cons of gas powered vs. electric powered system for DHW [domestic hot water] and for in-floor radiant heating,” she writes in a Q&A post at Green Building Advisor. “If we set aside the issue of fossil fuel use, what are the pros and cons of each?”That question is the topic for this Q&A Spotlight.[Lydia Segal’s name appears as “User-6885857” in her original post. For instructions on how to change screen names, see How the GBA Site Displays Readers’ Names.] Burning fossil fuels is always a concernIt’s not really possible to set aside the environmental issues raised by the use of fossil fuels, replies GBA senior editor Martin Holladay. Burning fossil fuels “happens to be the greatest environmental threat to life on our planet,” Holladay writes.“Most green builders design all-electric houses,” he adds. “If their local electric company offers a program for the purchase of wind-powered electricity, they sign up with the program. If possible, they install an on-site photovoltaic (PV) system to balance their annual energy use.” Heating demands can be very lowIf Segal’s new house is designed with passive solar principles in mind, and is well insulated and air-sealed, she might not need an elaborate heating system, says Robert Opaluch.“It is possible that the amount of heat you will need even during the coldest ‘design temperature’ days or overcast days will be fairly small,” he says. “You may not be able to cost-justify a central heating system. The inexpensive electric mesh radiant floor or minisplits noted by Dana are likely to be all you need.”Opaluch built a passive solar home in Boulder, Colorado, and installed electric radiant panels in the ceiling on the first floor and used in once in five years. Upstairs, radiant electric heat is needed on only about a third of the nights in mid-winter.“This 1980s house might barely meet today’s ‘Pretty Good House’ level of insulation and air-sealing, but was passive solar,” he adds. “You can calculate the wintertime solar heat gains and heat losses to design a passive solar home that works well in Colorado, an ideal cold sunny climate for passive solar wintertime space heating.” Assessing renewable energyOne potential problem Segal sees with electricity is the proportion of non-renewables in the mix.“Your suggestion about going all-electric is a good one,” she writes, “though it leaves me in a conundrum as the local energy company Xcel, states on their web page for Colorado, 45% from coal and 25% energy derived from natural gas. So no escaping non-renewables. Local ordinances mandate grid connection.”That’s not necessarily true, says Holladay. Xcel offers its customers a program called Windsource, which allows them to buy power that’s generated by wind turbines.In addition to buying “lo-carb” electricity from the utility, using PV to generate her own power offers a number of advantages, Dorsett says. PV will help lower both peak and average loads on the grid, and is cost-effective when net-metering is in effect.“Being connected to the grid, when your PV output exceeds your load and you are exporting electricity to the grid, your power exports are offsetting fossil-fuel use and lowering the amount of power being transferred on the local grid and transmission grid,” Dorsett writes. “Your power is effectively going from your house to your neighbor’s house. When buying wind power from a remote wind farm, it is putting power onto a transmission grid that’s offloaded at a substation to your local distribution, which is quite a bit more infrastructure use.”The rate at which renewables are being added to the grid is increasing, Dorsett adds, with wind power now cheaper than combined-cycle natural gas, and with utility-scale solar not too far behind. “So even if it’s a heavy fossil-fired grid in September 2017, within the life cycle of your heating system that is likely to change dramatically.”last_img read more

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Friends to battle it out on day one

first_imgThey’ve grown up playing alongside each other, from affiliate level to state through to national representation. Day one of the 2013 X-Blades National Youth Championships (NYC) will see good friends Kimberley Sue See, Chloe Crotty and Evania Pelite battle it out, with Sue See playing for Queensland Fire, while Crotty and Pelite will play for home side the Sunshine Coast Pineapples. They’ve tasted plenty of success together over the past 12 months, playing in the winning Queensland Secondary Schools Touch team at the 2012 X-Blades National Youth Championships, for Australia against New Zealand in the 2013 Super Trans Tasman Series and recently for Caboolture at the 2013 Queensland Junior State Cup. For Sue See to be playing against Crotty and Pelite is a rare opportunity, and the trio don’t have to wait long into the event for this to happen, playing each other in round three of the NYC event, on Wednesday afternoon. austouch.com.au caught up Crotty, Pelite and Sue See in the lead up to the event to see what they are looking forward to, and their favourite memories playing at the event to date. Chloe CrottyHow much are you looking forward to playing your last National Youth Championships event at home?It’s good, it’s not far to travel and it just brings the excitement a bit more playing in front of a home crowd, I’m very excited. You played Tasmania in a trial game last night, how was that?It was really good, it was a good hit out for us and them, we got to try out all of our moves and that and so did they. Can you tell us a bit about the Sunshine Coast team that will take to the field this week?We’ve got a few 15-year-olds and a few 16-year-olds and the rest are about 18, we’ve been playing together for a while now, we are all excited. It’s safe to say that you three have played a fair bit of Touch Football together over the years haven’t you?It’s good because we are all friends as well, we’re all really close. You get to play Kim and the rest of the Queensland Fire team tomorrow afternoon, how much are you looking forward to that?I think that’s the game we are all looking forward to the most, because we’ve played with a lot of the girls from the Queensland team. It’s going to be good, hopefully we win. What is your favourite National Youth Championships memory?Winning, that was probably one of the best feelings, winning that NYC and beating New South Wales. What do you enjoy about playing at the National Youth Championships?I just like the atmosphere, everyone is really happy and friendly.Your Dad is your coach at this event, how do you find that experience?He’s been my coach for a few years now, since I started playing Touch, I kind of forget that he is my Dad and treat him like my coach.Kimberley Sue SeeHow is your Queensland Fire team looking in the lead up to the event?They are definitely developing and we’ve had a good run up to the event, we’ve had a few injuries recently, which isn’t too good but we’re looking good. This time last year you were part of Queensland’s National Youth Championships win, how amazing was that experience?That was really good, I loved that because I got to play with the older girls who have so much experience and offer so much so I really enjoyed it. You get to play Evania and Chloe’s Sunshine Coast Pineapples team tomorrow afternoon, how much are you looking forward to it?I am looking forward to it a lot, I don’t get to play them very often, I’m normally playing with them so it will be interesting because we know each other’s games really well, so we’ll see how it goes.You have had an amazing year so far, did you expect to achieve so much at such a young age?No not at all, I love playing the game so I just play it for fun, to have those opportunities come up is just a bonus for me and something that I’ve worked really hard towards.How does it feel to be part of the Australian Women’s Open squad?It feels really good, I’m really nervous because they are such good players but I think I’ll just take the experience as it comes and enjoy it and learn from it. Do you think your team can win back-to-back titles this year?I think so, I definitely think we’ve got a good chance, we’ll see how we go and take each game as it comes. Evania PeliteHow much are you looking forward to your last National Youth Championships event?I’m really excited, I’ve been so nervous since last week. How does it feel to be able to play the event at home?It’s good to be able to play at home, it’s always good and there’s a good crowd that always comes out and watches. What do you remember about last year’s event playing for Queensland?Definitely winning, I remember just being so nervous running onto the field and the end result.Who are the teams to watch out for this week?Definitely Queensland and New South Wales Combined High Schools. You, Chloe and Kim have all played a lot of Touch Football together over the years, how much have you enjoyed that?It’s been so much fun, we’ve had a lot of laughs off the field and then when we are on the field we work so well together. What do you enjoy about the National Youth Championships?Just being able to meet up with all the other girls from all the other states because you build a lot of friendships. There are plenty of ways to keep up-to-date with all of the latest news and information from the 2013 X-Blades National Youth Championships (NYC). Websiteswww.nyc.mytouchfooty.comwww.austouch.com.au Social MediaFacebook – www.facebook.com/touchfootballaustraliaTwitter – www.twitter.com/touchfootyaus (be sure to use the hashtag #nyc2013)Instagram – www.instagram.com/touchfootballaustraliaYouTube – www.youtube.com/touchfootballaus Related LinksFriends To Meet on Day 1last_img read more

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Vancouver police say mom accused of parental abduction may have dyed boys

first_imgVANCOUVER – Vancouver police say a woman who allegedly abducted her nine-year-old son contrary to a custody order may have changed his appearance and dyed his hair.Police say Shawana Chaudhary, also known as Shawna, could also have changed her own appearance and may be using an old legal name.She was previously called Virjinia Leeman, which could be spelled Virginia Leman.Police say the boy, named Emerson, was last seen on Friday morning with his mother and six-year-old sister, who is not believed to be the subject of a custody order.Police say Emerson’s father went to pick him up on Friday after school as per his court-ordered parenting time, but the boy was missing.Chaudhary is 34 and police say she may also be travelling with one or two dogs.last_img read more

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