Buffalo police officers arrested after shoving 75-year-old protester

first_imgphotobyphotoboy/iStockBY: AARON KATERSKY, MATT FOSTER AND CHRISTINA CARREGA, ABC NEWS(BUFFALO, N.Y.) — Two Buffalo, New York, police officers are now facing criminal charges in connection with the graphic caught-on-video shove of a 75-year-old man during a protest, prosecutors said.Officers Aaron Torglaski and Robert McCabe were charged with second-degree assault during their video arraignments on Saturday and were released on their own recognizance. They both entered no guilty pleas and are expected back in court on July 20.The Thursday protest at Niagara Square had less than 20 demonstrators and several members of Buffalo Police Department’s Emergency Response Team, officials said.One of the protesters, Martin Gugino was seen on video walking in the direction of the crowd of uniformed officers when Torglaski and McCabe allegedly shoved him.Gugino fell flat onto his back and bumped the back of his head on the concrete, video shows. The sound of the man’s head hitting the ground silenced the crowd, according to the video.A trail of blood can be seen seeping from the head of the motionless man as several officers walked by him.“Mr. Gugino has been a longtime peaceful protester, human rights advocate, and overall fan of the U.S. Constitution for many years. At this time, Mr. Gugino is in serious but stable condition. He is alert and oriented,” said Kelly V. Zarcone, Gugino’s attorney, in a statement.Another officer, possibly a National Guard member, who went to aid the bleeding man was pushed by fellow officers, the video shows.The spokesperson for the city and police department, Mike DeGeorge, initially said in a statement that the man “tripped and fell.”“Once the department became aware of additional video from the scene, they immediately opened an investigation,” DeGeorge told ABC News on Thursday.Both officers were suspended and the Erie County District Attorney John Flynn launched an investigation.The police union opposed the suspensions and in response 57 officers on the emergency team resigned from their positions, but will remain on the force.The county executive for the area said at a press conference on Friday that Flynn had a “history of prosecuting officers who break the law, I trust him to do the same in this matter.”Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Candidates announced for Overseers, Alumni Association elected directors

first_imgThis spring, alumni can vote for a new group of Harvard Overseers and Harvard Alumni Association (HAA) elected directors.Ballots will be mailed no later than April 1. Completed ballots must be received, at the indicated address, by 5 p.m. E.D.T. on May 16 to be counted. All holders of Harvard degrees, except Corporation members and officers of instruction and government, are entitled to vote for Overseer candidates. The election for HAA directors is open to all Harvard degree holders.Candidates for Overseer may also be nominated by petition. Eligible voters may go to www.harvard.edu/board-election for more information. The deadline for all petitions is February 1.The HAA Nominating Committee has proposed the following candidates in 2017:FOR OVERSEER:Paul L. Choi ’86 magna cum laude, J.D. ’89 magna cum laudePartner, Sidley Austin LLPChicago, ILMariano-Florentino Cuéllar ’93 magna cum laudeJustice, Supreme Court of CaliforniaSan Francisco, CADarienne B. Driver, Ed.M. ’06, Ed.D. ’14Superintendent of Schools, Milwaukee Public SchoolsMilwaukee, WICarla Harris ’84 magna cum laude, M.B.A. ’87Vice Chair of Wealth Management and Managing Director, Morgan StanleyNew York, NYLane MacDonald ’88 cum laudePresident, FMR Diversified InvestmentsBoston, MAElizabeth D. Samet ’91 magna cum laudeProfessor of English, U.S. Military AcademyWest Point, NYCraig R. Stapleton ’67 magna cum laude, M.B.A. ’70Senior Advisor, Stone Point CapitalGreenwich, CTLeslie P. Tolbert ’73 cum laude, Ph.D. ’78Regents’ Professor, Department of Neuroscience, University of ArizonaTucson, AZFOR ELECTED DIRECTOR:Martha Abbruzzese Genieser ’91Director of Philanthropy, Alan Howard Family OfficeLondon, U.K.Nathaniel Q. Belcher, M.Arch. ’92Professor of Architecture, Stuckeman School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture, Pennsylvania State UniversityUniversity Park, PASangu Julius Delle ’10 cum laude, J.D. ’17, M.B.A. ’17Chairman and CEO, Golden Palm Investments Corporation; Founder and President, cleanacwaAccra, GhanaDrew Engles ’87 cum laudeHand and Microvascular Surgeon, Akron Children’s HospitalAkron, OHSachin H. Jain ’02 magna cum laude, M.D. ’06, M.B.A. ’07President and Chief Executive Officer, CareMore Health SystemCerritos, CAElena Hahn Kiam ’85 cum laudeCo-Owner and Creative Director, K-FIVE LLC d/b/a lia sophia; Co-Owner and non-executive Marketing Director, Cirrus Healthcare ProductsNew York, NYRonald P. Mitchell ’92 cum laude, M.B.A. ’97Chief Executive Officer, Virgil Inc.New York, NYPaola A. Peacock Friedrich, S.M. ’06, Ed.L.D. ’14Human Capital Management Consultant, AchieveMissionMarblehead, MALeslie Miller Saiontz ’81Founder and President, Achieve MiamiMiami, FLlast_img read more

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What we eat and why we eat it

first_img How to feed 10 billion by midcentury The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news. Food binds us together. A shared meal can help broker peace between families, or peace between nations. But food also can be divisive. Deciding what to eat is about more than nutrition or what tastes good. What we choose to feed ourselves and our families is a product of our cultural and political identities.In the latest series from Veritalk, a podcast from the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Harvard Ph.D. students share their insights into the science and culture of food.Episode 1: Turmeric lattes and tikki masala,The connection between food and culture fascinates Nikhita Obeegadoo, who taught a course entirely about the connection between food and diaspora. In her class, students explored the ways that immigrants have brought new food traditions into American culture.“Culture is always changing, culture is always evolving,” Obeegadoo said. “And there is something unrealistic in expecting food to just stay the way it is.”Episode 2: Veritalk goes vegan,Americans’ eating habits might be on the verge of another major cultural shift. Sociology student Nina Gheihman says that like it or not, climate change will make animal agriculture unsustainable. Fast-food companies are trying to get ahead of that trend. Burger King and White Castle recently introduced beef-free burgers. And, very soon, lab-grown meat will hit the consumer market.“I think this is really exciting technology because we really do have a huge problem when it comes to the ethical and the environmental consequences of animal agriculture,” Gheihman said. “So it has huge potential in changing our food system.”Episode 3: Go with your gut,Surprisingly, there is a lot that scientists don’t yet know about how the foods we eat affect our health. We get help in digesting food from trillions of tiny bacteria in our guts. Cary Allen-Blevins studies the connection between breast milk and the infant gut microbiome, and Vayu Maini Rekdal studies the way microbes help us get nutrition from plants.“If you did not have gut microbiota in your system, then a lot of things go really haywire,” Allen-Blevins said. “There are differences in immune regulation. There are differences in behavior.”Episode 4: Your body isn’t broken,Not everyone has access to healthy foods. Education programs in schools have tried to change that. But Hannah Cory, who worked as a school dietitian in Michigan, takes issue with the idea that education alone can prevent childhood obesity.“There isn’t a lot of acknowledgment in the literature of the fact that the ‘obesity epidemic’ has been going on for almost two decades now,” said Cory. “I would have students coming in to meet with me and they could already tell me everything I was going to tell them.”To hear the latest from Harvard Ph.D. students on matters from food to monsters to plumage, subscribe to Veritalk. Plan on less meat, more plants, and … err … pass the crickets, panelists suggest The dietary factor Could a popular food ingredient raise the risk for diabetes and obesity? Relatedlast_img read more

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