Prep Sports Roundup: 4/15

first_imgApril 15, 2021 /Sports News – Local Prep Sports Roundup: 4/15 Brad James FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailSoftballRegion 12MOAB, Utah-Paige Shumway and Jaci Shumway homered and the Grand Red Devils pummeld Richfield 11-1 Thursday in Region 12 softball action. Sydney Knutson homered in the loss for the Lady Cats.Region 14MT. PLEASANT, Utah-Katie Larsen and Haylee Daniels drove in three runs apiece and the Manti Templars drilled North Sanpete 11-1 in Region 14 softball action Thursday. Tiffany Hermansen earned the win in the circle for Manti. Lucy Oldroyd homered in the loss for the Hawks.Boys SoccerRegion 12RICHFIELD, Utah-Jake Hyatt’s hat trick led the way as the Richfield Wildcats pounded San Juan 7-0 in Region 12 boys soccer play. Ty Morgan added a pair of goals for Richfield with Kaden Carter and Jackson Archibald also scoring for the Wildcats. Spencer Christensen earned the shutout for Richfield.Region 14ROOSEVELT, Utah-Trace Boggess posted a hat trick and the Manti Templars clobbered Union 7-1 Thursday in Region 14 boys soccer action. Juan Palmerin scored twice for Manti in the win. Aldalberto Mireles and Austin Cox also found the net for the Templars in victory. Angel Cardena had 3 assists for the Templars and Palmerin added two more. Landyn Larsen scored in the loss for the Cougars.MT. PLEASANT, Utah-Braiden Gonder amassed 4 goals and the Delta Rabbits pounded North Sanpete 7-2 in Region 14 boys soccer action Thursday. Oran Finlinson, Rider Rogers and Carlos Acosta also scored in victory for the Rabbits.2-A SouthBEAVER, Utah-Jayton Jessup and Jose Albelais each scored and the Beaver Beavers blanked North Sevier 2-0 Thursday in 2-A South boys soccer play. Breagan Lopshire earned the shutout for the Beavers.2-A CentralMT. PLEASANT, Utah-Kuya Fujii, Vicenzo D’Oliveira and Vinicius Coelho each scored as the Wasatch Academy Tigers waxed Merit 3-1 in 2-A Central boys soccer action Thursday.center_img Written bylast_img read more

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Value-Based Care and Industry Consolidation Driving Demand for Vendor Neutral Archives

first_imgAfter investing in health information technology for several years, the healthcare industry has found itself mired in digital data today, and in the years to come.Indeed, in 2016, IDC, in collaboration with Dell EMC, projected that healthcare stakeholders will produce 2,314 exabytes of data by 2020, a significant increase over the 153 exabytes generated in 2013.This data growth comes during a time of major transformation around both the delivery of healthcare services, and the way that providers are reimbursed. In the value-based care environment, where payment is tied to clinical efficiency and patient outcomes, healthcare data fragmentation is problematic. Clinicians need access to more data sources and analytics to generate insights and determine the most efficacious treatment for their patients.The challenge of this evolving industry is that today’s health IT infrastructures were not architected and deployed in a way that streamlines data sharing even within a single institution.Until recently, healthcare organizations deployed diagnostics tools to meet the needs of individual departments. These isolated projects included localized storage infrastructure, leading to the creation of a new data silo with each additional deployment.  This approach subsequently complicated the task of compiling a complete digital picture of a patient’s health from disparate information sources.The continued rise in hospital mergers and acquisitions adds further complexity, as healthcare IT systems undergo consolidation. Pressure to better manage costs and significantly improve the patient experience has led providers towards consolidation, but it has not always been easy for merging organizations to synthesize their data along with their administrative operations.Siloed Infrastructure Unable to Provide a 360-Degree Patient View to CliniciansTraditional IT infrastructure – and in particular, storage architectures supporting existing and new modalities – represent a significant roadblock for providers seeking an integrated workflow across departments.Legacy workflows, infrastructures, and storage architectures are not designed to support a 360-degree view of the patient, nor can they handle the accelerated growth of medical imaging data that will eventually feed machine learning and artificial intelligence models geared towards providing clinical decision support.Historically, if you had three PACS, a physician wanting to look at a patient’s images across all systems would technically have to open three different viewers, log in three different times and search for the patient three different ways. Then the physician would need to manually look at and process the images, and assemble them in their head.VNA’s Ensure Reliable Access to the Right Data at the Right TimeFortunately, a solution to healthcare workflow integration for medical imaging does exist in the form of the vendor-neutral archive (VNA). A storage infrastructure that does not require a redesign every time an organization adds new data sources or makes workflow adjustments can significantly improve efficiency and IT agility, offering enhanced insights and more reliable access to the right data at the right time.Migrating these files to new storage systems during an architecture upgrade, for example, can be a complicated project. Most organizations undertake this type of periodic refresh process every three to five years to prevent hardware failures and upgrade infrastructure capabilities. As organizations generate and store more medical imaging data, the project can get more complex and costly each time.A VNA can prevent data gaps by managing all updates to DICOM files and pointers, drastically reducing the burdens and costs of this critical process.A VNA also allows a healthcare organization to integrate viewing capabilities and storage with other health IT solutions regardless of its specific PACS application vendor, and its automated data reconciliation capabilities will result in less time spent on ensuring that healthcare providers are able to retrieve the data they need to make informed decisions.Ultimately, provider organizations should seek to create future-proof infrastructure that is flexible enough to support a broad range of anticipated performance demands, including advanced data analytics, expansion into private, hybrid, or public clouds, and constantly changing clinical workflows.The VNA is a foundational component of a healthcare ecosystem predicated on efficiency and quality. The challenge remains making preparations for a VNA deployment and choosing the right strategy for the successful launch of a new system.To achieve these goals, organizations may wish to partner with infrastructure development vendors who can help them to scale their architecture without downtime and consolidate without detracting from day-to-day performance while reducing or eliminating the burdens of future migrations.Value-based care and provider consolidation are driving healthcare organizations to reevaluate the status of their current resources, especially health information. While some health systems and hospitals have the financial capital for a VNA deployment, others may have to consider a phased approach. In either case, a business imperative is driving medical imaging integration with other health IT systems to ensure that physicians are making care decisions based on the most pertinent, complete, and timely patient data.For more information on Dell EMC’s Vendor Neutral Archiving solution, download our white paper here.last_img read more

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Carroll Hall to host Lakeside Music Festival

first_imgCarroll Hall will host their signature event, Lakeside Music Festival, Saturday at 2 p.m. to exhibit student bands and musical talents. “Lakeside was started about five years ago, and its main aim is to better the music culture here at Notre Dame, because honestly in some aspects it’s pretty lacking,” junior Christian Cyrul, the commissioner in charge of the festival, said. “It’s just a fun time, a whole afternoon where people can enjoy music from student bands and also for student bands to get recognition.” Courtesy of Dani Meersman Students gather at the 2017 Lakeside Music Festival for an afternoon of entertainment, where all proceeds were donated to the Boys and Girls Club of South Bend.Unlike in previous years, this year’s Lakeside Music Fesitival was co-sponsored by the Student Union Board (SUB), which gave the event more funding to work with. “SUB got involved with it through Christian Cyrul,” senior Bailey Kendall, a director of programming for SUB, said. “He presented us with this really cool opportunity to help fundraise for a good cause and also it fits with SUB’s mission really well.” SUB, in general, looks to fund events that foster inclusivity across the student body, she said.“There’s no cap on the capacity of people that can go to Lakeside, which was something that was really important to us,” Kendall said. “It’s an inclusive event, its free, anyone can go to it, so we co-sponsored it to add more cool things to it.”Senior Bethany Boggess, executive director of SUB, said the collaboration was made possible in part because of extra money in the SUB budget. “The reason we had the awesome opportunity to sponsor Lakeside this year is because we had sort of a transition year with CJF, the Collegiate Jazz Festival, where we were able to work out a collaboration with them for CJF,” Boggess said. “So we had some money left over in our budget.”Boggess also said the co-sponsorship was a natural fit, especially given the similarities in purpose between CJF and Lakeside. “What we wanted to do was to find a way to spend that extra money in a meaningful way that still kind of went to the heart of what CJF does for students [and] provides entertainment via music to students,” Boggess said. “That’s the same thing Lakeside accomplishes, as well, so it was kind of a natural sponsorship for us and a great way for us to add to an already amazing event.”  Cyrul said the additional funding has allowed the event to be more ambitious, with funds going toward food trucks, better-quality shirts and more advertising.  “Last year we had to kind of go to a bunch of different places to get funds and really didn’t have enough to have a lot of the free food we’re going to have this year,” Cyrul said. “So a lot of that funding is going toward the food trucks, and so those are going to be free for all students who come. We’ll have over 900 meals throughout the day.”Cyrul said he also pushed for including more South Bend music culture in the event.“This year, I’ve kind of expanded [the event] a little bit by trying to bridge the gap between South Bend and Notre Dame,” Cyrul said. “So we’re advertising a lot to the South Bend community, and we’re also inviting a couple of South Bend bands to come and perform as well.” Cyrul said the event is made up of 12 acts. Performers range from single acts to duos and bands — some even including professors.While the event is free to attend and open to all, one of Lakeside’s main goals is fundraising, mainly through the Lakeside shirts which will be sold at the event. All the proceeds go to the Boys and Girls Club in South Bend, Cyrul said. Cyrul said the event’s relaxed nature is important to the overall Lakeside experience.“The atmosphere going forward is not necessarily like a nighttime concert where everyone is focused on the stage but more of a chance to just gather with your friends, hang out in the sun and listen to some awesome music,” he said.Tags: Carroll Hall, Lakeside, lakeside music festival, Student Union Board, SUBlast_img read more

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White grubs

first_imgBy Dan RahnUniversity of GeorgiaYou’d expect something that could destroy huge chunks of your lawn to look menacing and possess a suitably evil name. It’s just hard to fear white grubs.They need a better agent, because their looks (little C-shaped worms with creamy white abdomens and brown heads) are deceiving. When these things quietly munch away at grassroots, they can be deadly to your lawn.And you can’t even tell they’re there.”You have to check for them,” said Will Hudson, a University of Georgia Cooperative Extension entomologist.Even in heavy populations, he said, it takes a long time for small grubs to do damage. The symptoms are wilted or brown patches of turf. But that’s not uncommon in late summer and early fall.”Especially this year,” Hudson said, “bad-looking grass can be due to hot, dry weather or other factors such as disease or poor fertility. The only way to tell for sure is to dig in and look.”Baby bugsWhite grubs are the larval stages of a number of beetles, he said, including green June beetles, chafers, May and June beetles and Japanese beetles.To check your lawn for them, take a shovel and cut three sides of a square foot of lawn turf, Hudson said. Then fold that flap of sod back and look for grubs in the top 1 to 2 inches of soil and the grassroots.”If the soil is dry,” he said, “the grubs will be down deep, so be sure the soil moisture is good before you start.”If the number of grubs averages more than four per square foot, he said, you may need to apply an insecticide. To decide the best one to use, find out which species of grubs you have.Your county UGA Extension agent can help you identify white grub species. Or get a leaflet, “White Grub Pests on Turfgrass,” at the county Extension office or online (pubs.caes.uga.edu/caespubs/pubcd/l428-w.html).ControlFor home lawns, Hudson said, the best insecticides to use are granulated formulations of imidacloprid (sold in the Bayer Advanced Season-Long Grub Control Granules, Scotts GrubEx Season-Long Grub Killer, etc.), or the growth regulator halofenazide (sold as Grub-B-Gon).”Both of these products are effective on small grubs,” he said. “As we get into the fall, they won’t control the larger grubs as well. The only ‘rescue’ treatment labeled for home use is trichlorfon, which is sold as Dylox or Bayer Advanced 24-Hour Grub Killer Plus.”Whatever you use, he said, it’s critical to water it in properly. If you don’t, it’s useless.You have to get it to the roots, he said. Because they’re in the soil, white grubs are hard to control anyway. If you don’t get the insecticide down there where they are, you don’t have a chance to get them.”Avoid very hot times with bright sunlight, too,” Hudson said. “For the best results, treat late in the afternoon.”(Dan Rahn is a news editor with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.)last_img read more

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