Haseeb Hameed’s homecoming to Gujarati roots as England opener

first_imgHaseeb Hameed, the 19-year-old England opener, who on Wednesday made his Test debut against India in Rajkot, came back home to Gujarat. Well, kind of. While his whole life has been spent in foreign shores, not many would know that the elegant right-hander has his roots in Gujarat. (Rajkot Test: Root, Moeen shine for England as India toil)Haseeb’s parents and family were there at the Saurashtra Cricket Association stadium to see their son make their debut against India. The youngster’s parents were born here and interestingly, his brother, Numan, got married in Gujarat few days back. (SCORECARD)Hameed was in the English squad during the tour of Bangladesh where he easily could have got a match but England persisted with Ben Duckett at the top and Gary Ballance in the middle order as the young boy was only running on-field to deliver drinks. However, Ballance’s poor form in Bangladesh prompted the English think-tank to give Hameed his maiden Test cap, which he received from former captain Mike Atherton.At 19 years and 297 days, Hameed became the youngest ever opener for England in Tests and the fifth youngest player ever to debut in the longest format for England, just one year and 148 days short of the record holder: Dennis Brian Close.The Lancashire opener had an impressive outing with the bat as he managed to score 31 off 82 balls before falling to Ravichandran Ashwin.England have failed to find a stable partner for Alastair Cook to open the innings after the retirement of  Andrew Strauss. Before Hammed, England tried nine different openers and they have all failed to cement a spot in the team in the long run. Hameed became Cook’s 10th opening partner in four years.advertisementWhile some might say that he was rushed, he has a strong case to defend himself. He was the fifth highest run-getter in the county season with 1198 runs at an average of 49.41 and he also beat Michael Atherton to become Lancashire’s youngest ever player to reach 1000 runs. Not only that, Hameed also has a very impressive record against his name as he became the first player to score a century on both the innings in a Lancashire vs. Yorkshire match.Making his debut in India, sharing the field with his idol Virat Kohli and then scoring a gritty 31 – things are falling in place for young Hameed. If he can continue to display the hunger for runs and elegance he has, England might just find their next Alastair Cook, who if you remember made his debut against India in Nagpur back in 2006 and the rest, as they say, is history. Hameed followed his first innings outing with a polished 82 in the second, which also happens to be the highest score by an England teenager since Jack Crawford against South Africa 110 years ago in 1906.Hameed’s presence at the top along with Cook is bound to give England plenty of assurance going forward against the number-one ranked Test side in the world. England have some pretty tough challenges coming up and Hameed’s resistance and patience could  be the key to his long-term success.last_img read more

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Centres decision on citizenship to Chakmas, Hajongs opposed

first_imgItanagar, May 27 (PTI) The Centres decision to grant citizenship to Chakma and Hajong refugees in Arunachal Pradesh was today opposed by students unions and some political parties who demanded that the state government pursue the matter rigorously with it.A consultative meeting held during the day by All Arunachal Pradesh Students Union(AAPSU) resolved and endorsed AAPSU to conduct an all party meeting to be compulsorily attended by all the 60 MLAs and three MPs of the state within one week to draw more consensus on the issue.It also resolved to revive the high power committee constituted by the union home ministry to study the refugee issue besides carrying out enumeration of the population of Chakmas, Hajongs and Tibetan refugees in the state and discuss the issue of granting ST status to Yobin community in the all party meeting.The meeting appealed to the state government to carry out eviction drive and contain the refugees within the designated blocks till a mechanism is framed.AAPSU president Hawa Bagang expressed surprise over the Centres move even after it assured the students? body at a recent meeting in New Delhi that it would look into the issue positively.Its legal advisor Marto Kato wondered how the Central decision was taken when a curative petition and a special leave petition filed by the state government and the union was pending with the Supreme Court.AAPSU, the apex students union of the state, has been spearheading the movement against the refugees since 1990 and has expressed apprehension that if Chakmas and Hajongs are granted citizenship and settlement rights in Arunachal Pradesh the indigenous tribal communities would be reduced to a minority and opportunities currently available to them would be taken away.advertisementThe meeting was attended by All Papum Pare District Students? Union (APPDSU) and All Tai-Khampti Singpho Students Union, which blamed the state government for improper planning to deal with the issue.Arunachal Press Club President Chopa Cheda asked the AAPSU leadership to immediately convene the all party meeting for a lasting resolution of the problem.Peoples Party of Arunachal (PPA) central working committee chairman Kameng Ringu asked the state government to discuss the matter immediately with the Centre and suggested setting up of a refugee department. Former minister Nyato Rigia suggested the AAPSU leadership to work in tandem with the state government to hammer out a permanent solution.Sports and Youth Affairs department chairman Bamang Tago suggested for confining the refugees in their designated camps till a permanent solution is arrived at and a tripartite talk between the state government, central government and representatives from Chakmas and Hajongs.The meeting also discussed issues including status of Tibetan refugees in the state, enacting laws to protect and safeguard indigenous tribal rights and status of Yobin and Lisu community. Chakmas and Hajongs were originally residents of Chittagong Hill Tracts in erstwhile East Pakistan who left their homeland when it was submerged by the Kaptai dam project in the 1960s. The Chakmas, who are Buddhists, and Hajongs, who are Hindus, also faced religious persecution and entered India through the then Lushai Hills district of Assam (now Mizoram). The Centre moved the majority of them to the North East Frontier Agency (NEFA), which is now Arunachal Pradesh. According to officials, the number of these refugees has increased from about 5,000 in 1964-69 to 1,00,000. At present, they do not posses citizenship and land rights but are provided basic amenities by the state government. In 2015, the Centre was given a deadline by the Supreme Court to confer citizenship to these refugees within three months. The Arunachal Pradesh government approached the apex court in appeal against the order but its curative petition is yet to be heard. PTI UPL KK PSlast_img read more

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