The history of April Fool’s Day (or is it fake history?)

first_img Please enter your name here The Anatomy of Fear Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Please enter your comment! TAGSApril 1stApril Fool’s DayOrson Welles Previous articleHere comes the rain: Expert tips for wet weather drivingNext articleApopka Art & Jazz Festival Moving Indoors Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR From The History ChannelOn this day in 1700, English pranksters begin popularizing the annual tradition of April Fool’s Day by playing practical jokes on each other.Although the day, also called All Fools’ Day, has been celebrated for several centuries by different cultures, its exact origins remain a mystery. Some historians speculate that April Fools’ Day dates back to 1582, when France switched from the Julian calendar to the Gregorian calendar, as called for by the Council of Trent in 1563. People who were slow to get the news or failed to recognize that the start of the new year had moved to January 1 and continued to celebrate it during the last week of March through April 1 became the butt of jokes and hoaxes. These included having paper fish placed on their backs and being referred to as “poisson d’avril” (April fish), said to symbolize a young, easily caught fish and a gullible person.Historians have also linked April Fools’ Day to ancient festivals such as Hilaria, which was celebrated in Rome at the end of March and involved people dressing up in disguises. There’s also speculation that April Fools’ Day was tied to the vernal equinox, or first day of spring in the Northern Hemisphere, when Mother Nature fooled people with changing, unpredictable weather.April Fools’ Day spread throughout Britain during the 18th century. In Scotland, the tradition became a two-day event, starting with “hunting the gowk,” in which people were sent on phonyAliens attack earth!errands (gowk is a word for cuckoo bird, a symbol for fool) and followed by Tailie Day, which involved pranks played on people’s derrieres, such as pinning fake tails or “kick me” signs on them.For the complete article on April Fool’s Day, go here……That Orson Welles hoax just never gets old.In modern times, people have gone to great lengths to create elaborate April Fools’ Day hoaxes. Newspapers, radio and TV stations and Web sites have participated in the April 1 tradition of reporting outrageous fictional claims that have fooled their audiences. In 1957, the BBC reported that Swiss farmers were experiencing a record spaghetti crop and showed footage of people harvesting noodles from trees; numerous viewers were fooled. In 1985, Sports Illustrated tricked many of its readers when it ran a made-up article about a rookie pitcher named Sidd Finch who could throw a fastball over 168 miles per hour. In 1996, Taco Bell, the fast-food restaurant chain, duped people when it announced it had agreed to purchase Philadelphia’s Liberty Bell and intended to rename it the Taco Liberty Bell. In 1998, after Burger King advertised a “Left-Handed Whopper,” scores of clueless customers requested the fake sandwich.For the REAL article on April Fool’s Day, go here. You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address herelast_img read more

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Much loved family home on market for first time in 40 years

first_img37 Wackett Street, Pallarenda“The house we had in Sydney, you had to climb at least 50 steps to get to the front door, which wasn’t always a lot of fun,” Mr Carter recalls.“So we knew we didn’t want that again. We wanted a lowset home with a pool for the kids and, having always loved the ocean, a home that was near the beach.“When we bought this home it was near-new, only about three or four years old and it had everything we wanted.“We really enjoyed living here and like Pallarenda a great deal, but we’re now both in our 80s and wanting something a bit smaller and looking to move to the RSL villas.”More from news01:21Buyer demand explodes in Townsville’s 2019 flood-affected suburbs12 Sep 202001:21‘Giant surge’ in new home sales lifts Townsville property market10 Sep 2020 37 Wackett Street, PallarendaListed for a negotiable price of $419,000, the home sits on a spacious 708sq m block which backs on to a large landscaped parkland. The property consists of two separate dwellings, with the main house featuring multiple airconditioned living areas with a sunroom adjoining the lounge and dining room serviced by the functional kitchen. There are also three bedrooms, all with built-ins, storage in hallway and bathroom with plunge spa bath and separate toilet.The second dwelling has a large airconditioned bedroom complete with shower and toilet. There is a large workshop on the end of this building and a covered entertaining area that overlooks the inground saltwater pool. It’s a great place to take a dip and cool off on our sunny North Queensland days. The property also has its own bore to keep your lawns green all year round. WHEN Brad and Lee Carter relocated from Sydney to Townsville in 1976, there was never a doubt about the kind of home they wanted to buy to raise their two children.That dream home was none other than 37 Wackett St, Pallarenda, where the couple has now lived for 40 years.With the Carters now in their 80s and their children having left the family home some time ago, the couple are looking to downsize and hand over the keys to a worthy buyer.last_img read more

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