PayPal handles online donations for UNICEF Tsunami appeal

first_img Tagged with: Digital Trading AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis  27 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Online payment handler PayPal is handling online donations to UNICEF’s Tsunami Disaster Relief appeal, and has raised $404,379 by the end of 3 January 2005. PayPal, owned by eBay.com, says that it “will waive all fees in relation to the donation, so that UNICEF will receive 100% of the amount you donate.”The appeal is promoted with a graphic on the front page of PayPal’s site. This is the first time that PayPal has donated coverage for a charitable appeal on its front page. Advertisement PayPal handles online donations for UNICEF Tsunami appealcenter_img The PayPal UK front page doesn’t include the graphic, but it does include a text promotion of the appeal: “UK residents click here to make your donation to the US UNICEF Tsunami Relief Effort from the US PayPal site.” About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Howard Lake | 4 January 2005 | Newslast_img read more

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Stop the execution of Lezmond Mitchell!

first_imgThe U.S. government has scheduled the federal execution of 38-year-old Lezmond Mitchell of the Navajo Nation on Aug. 26, despite widespread condemnation. Great Seal of the Navajo Nation.The Navajo Nation has formally protested the execution on grounds of tribal sovereignty. Family members of Navajo citizens who Mitchell was convicted of killing have demanded a stay. Even the prosecutor who argued for Mitchell’s conviction opposes the federal death penalty. Even in the capitalist press, the decision to go forward with the execution has drawn criticism.Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez and Vice President Myron Lizer have called on the U.S. government to halt the execution: “The Navajo Nation and the family of the victims have not changed their position. We strongly hold to our cultural, traditional and religious beliefs that life is sacred.”Since the 1994 amendment of the Major Crimes Act, federal law prohibits the death penalty for any crimes committed on tribal land unless tribal authorities specifically request it. The flagrant violation of tribal sovereignty by the U.S. in scheduling Mitchell’s execution comes just months after a Supreme Court ruling that roughly half the state of Oklahoma is sovereign Muscogee (Cree) territory, a decision that could potentially affect thousands of incarcerated Indigenous people.The legal shell game that the U.S. government plays is nothing new. It has been the policy from the beginning of colonization for imperialist authorities in North America to lie and shred virtually every treaty signed with Indigenous people. The Major Crimes Act, originally passed by Congress in 1885 as part of the Indian Appropriations Act, specifically legalized and institutionalized the execution of Indigenous people by the federal government. In 1865 President Abraham Lincoln ordered the largest mass execution in U.S. history when he authorized the hanging of 38 Dakota (Santee Sioux) men in Minnesota. This brutality stands in sharp historical contrast to the U.S. government’s subsequent lenient treatment of enslavers, Confederate counterrevolutionaries and Klan members during the post-Civil War Reconstruction period.A new chapter of Indigenous resistance was written a century later. In 1968, the American Indian Movement was formed by incarcerated Indigenous leaders who became organizers in Stillwater Prison outside Minneapolis, Minn. They regarded the imprisonment of Indigenous people as a significant plank in the broader colonial policy of relocation and genocide.Today Native and Indigenous people in the U.S. are 14 times more likely to be killed by police than their white counterparts. They are incarcerated at a rate 38% higher than the national average. A Center for Disease Control report issued this August found that Native people – at high health risk from poverty and inadequate medical care – contract COVID-19 at triple the rate of white people.Since the recent lifting of a 17-year moratorium on the federal death penalty, 10 people have been executed by the U.S. government. Five others, along with Mitchell, are scheduled to be legally murdered over the next four months.Stop the execution of Lezmond Mitchell! Free them all!FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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Tallink Confirms Shuttle Ferry Newbuild Order

first_imgEstonian shipping company Tallink Grupp has firmed a contract for the construction of a new LNG-powered fast ferry at Finland-based Rauma Marine Constructions (RMC).The shipbuilding contract, worth around EUR 250 million (USD 281 million), was signed on March 27, following a letter of intent inked in October 2018.As informed, the shuttle ferry will be deployed on the Tallinn – Helsinki route. The design of the vessel will begin this spring, with the delivery scheduled for January 2022.Similarly to the group’s newest vessel Megastar, the new shuttle ferry will also be dual fuel operated. Its length will be approximately 212 metres and with a passenger capacity of 2,800.According to Tallink, the new vessel is another step for the company towards achieving even greater energy efficiency and eco-friendliness for its shipping operations. The new shuttle ferry, with a gross tonnage of approximately 50,000 and a service speed of 27 knots, will use LNG as main fuel and meet all the current and future known emission regulations.According to the terms of the contract, 30 percent of the total cost will be paid during the construction period and the rest after the delivery of the vessel. AS Tallink Grupp plans to finance 70 percent of the new ship cost in 2022 by a long-term loan.“The construction of Megastar and bringing this next generation vessel onto the Baltic Sea, has transformed our shuttle service between Tallinn and Helsinki… In addition to the increased passenger comfort, just as importantly, Megastar has taken our operations also to the next level in terms of environmentally friendly operations and increased efficiency,” Paavo Nõgene, CEO of Tallink Grupp, commented.“It was therefore only logical that a similar vessel should be built for the route sooner or later to enhance our operations on this important route for us even further,” Nõgene added.AS Tallink Grupp provides passenger transport and cargo transport services in the northern part of the Baltic Sea region. The company owns 14 vessels and operates seven ferry routes under the brand names of Tallink and Silja Line.last_img read more

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Sacred Heart coach Bike searches for 1st NCAA Tournament appearance in 35th season

first_img Published on February 26, 2013 at 1:21 am Contact Phil: [email protected] | @PhilDAbb Facebook Twitter Google+ Dave Bike has never met Jim Boeheim face to face, but of course he knows who he is. Boeheim is the only head coach in the country who’s been at one school longer than Bike has.“I said, ‘You know, I could see myself staying for a long time at a place like Sacred Heart,’” Bike said, looking back on the beginning of his coaching career. “I’ve been pretty content to come to work and enjoy coaching and enjoy the game.”Now in his 35th year as the Pioneers’ head coach, Bike is the second longest tenured head coach in Division I. Bike has reveled and struggled in his share of highs and lows, from winning the 1986 Division-II national championship, to the program’s difficult transition to the Division-I level.As the 65-year-old approaches the soon-looming end of his coaching career, the Pioneers (9-18, 7-9 Northeast Conference) are striving for their first Division-I NCAA Tournament appearance, a berth the team would like to clinch before Bike walks away.“This is my last year and my last opportunity to do so myself,” said senior guard Shane Gibson. “It would be great if my team was the first team to take him there. It’d be something he would never forget.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textNow at 529 victories, Bike began this season ranked 20th in wins among active NCAA coaches. He coached his 1,000th game in the Pioneers’ season-opener.Bike admits his career is not far from running its course, but Johnny Kidd, his assistant coach for 13 seasons, said Bike is capable of coaching for much longer.“He can coach as long as he wants, because the guy has a sharp mind,” Kidd said. “He takes care of all the financials – travel, things like that. Most head coaches don’t do that. He does that, and I think that’s what keeps him sharp. He is very meticulous to the penny.”But before Bike was a basketball coach, he had a career in another sport.Bike was an All-New England and All-state basketball selection, and standout baseball player at Notre Dame High School in Fairfield, Conn., but turned down a scholarship to play both sports at Fordham.After the Detroit Tigers drafted him in the eighth round of the 1965 Amateur Draft, he signed a contract, intrigued by the chance to make the majors and the salary that would accompany it.“I always liked basketball better,” Bike said. “But what happened was that I thought that I had a better chance to make the big time in baseball than I did in basketball. Wow, if I did that for five months work, making $7,500 a year, what a life that could bring. Times have changed, huh?”The 6-foot-4 catcher spent eight years in the minor leagues, mostly at Single-A, and reached the Tigers’ major league roster once, he said. In Detroit’s farm system, Bike said, he “went from a prospect to a reject to a suspect” after coming in with high expectations and enduring a “disastrous” slump in 1968.So, when baseball didn’t pan out, Bike knew he could go back to his favorite sport.“I think in sports, to stop playing or stop coaching is the hardest thing to do, to retire in sports,” Bike said. “So being a little bit disenchanted at the time, I decided to retire from baseball and pursue basketball.After four seasons as an assistant coach at Seattle, Bike returned home to Fairfield and SHU – which now includes the building in which he attended high school, he said – in 1978, and hasn’t left since.Bike’s tenure hit rock bottom from 1999-2006, the program’s first seven years at the Division-I level, during which the Pioneers struggled to a 54-141 mark. But the positives of Bike’s 35-year career severely outweigh the hardships.In the 1985-86 campaign, Bike garnered coach of the year honors after leading the Pioneers to a 30-4 record and a national championship – “the highlight” of his career. Also among Bike’s favorites were the regional championships SHU won in the 1980s, all on the road, Bike said, because the Pioneers’ gym was too small to host the four-team tournament.Bike doesn’t know exactly when he will put down the drawing board and call it a career, but he appreciates the experiences he’s had thus far.“It’s been a good run. I enjoyed the university itself. I watched it grow,” Bike said. “I watched the change from Division II to Division I, watched it change from a commuter school to now a very comprehensive university. Like my wife always says, ‘You find a job you like, you never have to work a day in your life.’“Well, I found a job I like, I found a place I love and it’s been a good ride.” Commentslast_img read more

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