Skin charity looks lively online

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis The British Skin Foundation’s new site www.britishskinfoundation.org.uk designed by Baigent Digital represents a massive step forward for this leading UK skin charity in communicating and supporting online, through cutting edge design and a highly creative refresh of their trusted brand.It’s a big visual departure for the charity, says BSF Press and Communications Officer Bevis Man. “The previous website was quite conservative and static. We want more people to get involved so we wanted something more lively. We’re aiming high with the changes we’re making, not just from a design perspective but also the content as well to make sure that when someone lands on our home page they feel inspired to discover more about us and what we do. Whilst our existing website certainly serves its purpose, the new one will hopefully be able to fully realise the potential we are looking for in supporters.”The new site provides information and support for sufferers of skin diseases and conducts research into new treatments and skin friendly products by companies such as Dyson and L’Oreal.The innovative design aims to attract new supporters and engage existing ones whilst raising the charity’s profile ahead of a busy year of fundraising events, particularly “Walk for Skin” in May. BSF have developed a site with strong calls to action – donate, events, news – to inspire users to support their important research.Baigent Digital worked to keep the identity fun and energetic without undermining the seriousness of the charity’s work, says the agency’s Creative Director, Steven Ramsay. ”We’ve taken the brand and given it a contemporary, yet scientific feel. We’ve used CSI-style fingerprint textures and close-ups of skin in an abstract way. The approach to the design of this site is a lot more creative and reflects the trend towards charities taking a stronger interest in design.”Notes to editors:Baigent Digital: Digital consultants, experts in enabling Charities to get the best from online. Baigent Digital offers consultancy to empower charities to take control of their online activities as well as resources to support them in designing, building, promoting and managing their digital communications. Baigent Digital has been working with charities for over 12 years and clients include The British Red Cross, Cancer Research UK, The WI, The Brooke, Breakthrough Breast Cancer, Care International, Scripture Union and WSPA .The British Skin Foundation (BSF) The only UK charity dedicated to skin disease research. Its main aim is to raise money for research projects that will hopefully result in cures or at the very least, a better understanding of the numerous skin conditions that affect millions of lives in the UK. To date they have funded over 230 projects totalling seven million pounds looking into a variety of skin diseases, such as skin cancer, eczema, Hidradenitis Suppurativa and psoriasis.Contact:Dawn Realmuto, PR Consultant, Baigent DigitalT 01494 770 120E [email protected] Advertisement Howard Lake | 12 April 2010 | News  44 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Tagged with: Digital Skin charity looks lively online About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

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Perben Bill “threatens confidentiality of journalists’ sources”

first_imgJournalists are not at present legally bound by professional confidentiality, as doctors and lawyers are. But they can conceal the identity of informants when they give court evidence (article 109-2 of the code of legal procedure). “We’ll hold Ilham Aliyev personally responsible if anything happens to this blogger in France” RSF says FranceEurope – Central Asia RSF denounces Total’s retaliation against Le Monde for Myanmar story FranceEurope – Central Asia Receive email alerts News The law currently only allows searches of media premises to be done by a judge, but Reporters Without Borders has always condemned the fact that a journalist’s home is not protected in this way and can be searched by an ordinary police detective. The Perben Bill aggravates this situation and poses an even greater threat to investigative journalism and independent journalists. RSF_en Follow the news on France Help by sharing this information April 25, 2003 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Perben Bill “threatens confidentiality of journalists’ sources” Reporters Without Borders today expressed deep concern about a proposed French law it said would endanger the right of journalists not to reveal their sources of information. The measure supplements legislation presented by interior minister Nicolas Sarkozy boosting the government’s internal security powers and giving it new means to obtain information.”This bill is another blow to the confidentiality of journalists’ sources,” said Reporters Without Borders secretary-general Robert Ménard in a letter to justice minister Dominique Perben. “Even if searches of media premises are still to be conducted under special rules, the measure is a new threat because journalists need only be considered ‘likely’ to have relevant information for them to be asked by a prosecutor or judge to divulge it. If they refuse, they can be fined. As we have said repeatedly, journalists are not to be treated as assistants to the police or the courts.”Perben presented a bill to the cabinet on 9 April officially “adapting the law to changes in criminal behaviour.” Its articles 28 and 49 say an examining magistrate, state prosecutor or police detective “can require any person or private or public company or institution likely to have material or information of interest to an investigation, including data in personal files, to hand it over or disclose it, without pleading exemption on grounds of professional secrecy.” Refusal could incur a fine of 3,750 euros. to go further News June 2, 2021 Find out more June 4, 2021 Find out more News The new proposal reduces the right of journalists not to reveal their sources. The European Court of Human Rights has however supported this right (The Goodwin decision, 27 March 1996) as one of the “corner-stones” of press freedom and said that “without such protection, sources may be deterred from assisting the press in informing the public on matters of public interest” and that “as a result, the vital public watchdog role of the press may be undermined.” News Use the Digital Services Act to make democracy prevail over platform interests, RSF tells EU Organisation May 10, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

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