Physician, Internal Medicine – Clinical Associate

first_imgGeneral DescriptionThe Johns Hopkins Executive and Preventive Health program isseeking a full-time Internal Medicine physician to provide directmedical care in an outpatient adult health care setting. Candidatesshould have a passion for preventive care and wellness. Clinicaltime will be spent at the newly remodeled Executive &Preventive Medicine suite at the Johns Hopkins Hospital inBaltimore, Maryland and at Sibley Memorial Hospital in Washington,DC.Duties and ResponsibilitiesThe physician will see a variety of patients for preventive carephysicals that are scheduled by the Executive and Preventive healthstaff. They will provide ongoing consultation and management inaccordance with accepted standards of practice on the days and atthe times established and scheduled. Based on the applicant’sinterest, additional clinical activities (ie, primary carepractice), teaching and scholarship opportunities would beavailable.The physician will attend administrative meetings as needed.The physician will utilize the electronic medical records system(Epic) to fulfill all administrative responsibilities attendant tohis/her performance of direct patient care. These responsibilitiesinclude timely and accurate completion and entry of patient notesof all patient encounters detailing services provided, andtreatment plans recommended, as well as any other requireddocumentation required by the Johns Hopkins Hospital in accordancewith its medical staff bylaws, and the policies and procedures ofthe Johns Hopkins Clinical Practice Association and the Executiveand Preventive Health Program.The physician will be expected to meet the target productivitystandards for the program, and is expected to have a full patientschedule during his/her clinical schedule; clinical activity andproductivity will be tracked periodically and provided; thephysician will not be penalized if a scheduled patient does notshow up at the time of his or her scheduled appointment.In providing physician services, Clinical Associate will exerciseindependent medical judgment consistent with approved methods andpractices in his/her specialty and in the best interest of thepatients.Other duties as assigned.Licensure, Certifications, Registration:M.D. Degree or the equivalent from an accredited medical school.Physician must be eligible to obtain licensure to practice medicinein Maryland and Washington, DC, and must be Board certified by theAmerican Board of Internal Medicine, and must maintain Boardcertification throughout duration of employment.Physician shall have DEA Certifications and Controlled Substance(CDS) Certification for Washington DC and Maryland.Excellent diagnostic, therapeutic, and interpersonal skills.Outstanding verbal and written communication, and the ability tointeract well with patients, family members, colleagues, staff.Reliability, flexibility, professional manner, and organizationalskills are essential. Must have excellent attention to detail andrecord keeping. Must be able to problem solve, prioritizeresponsibilities, and manage several priorities at once. Must beadaptive to changing technologies, for example, electronic medicalrecords.Physician shall at all times be qualified, professionallycompetent, and duly licensed to practice medicine and prescribe allpharmaceuticals in the State of Maryland and Washington, DC andshall complete requirements for obtaining and maintaininglicensure, including successful completion of required backgroundchecks. Physician represents that as of the Effective Date, he/sheis not subject to, or threatened with any investigation, censure,probation, suspension, or other adverse action with respect tohis/her medical license in any jurisdiction.Experience :Completion of ACGME Internal Medicine Residency trainingprogram.Clinical experience with populations in an outpatient setting ispreferred.Physical Requirements:Sitting, standing and walking for extended period of time. Reachingby extending hand(s) or arm(s) in any direction. Stooping andbending. Finger dexterity required to manipulate objects withfingers rather than with whole hand(s) or arm(s). Ability to movestandard equipment through a clinical environment.Equipment, Machine or Tool Requirements:Daily use of personal computer and keyboard, telephone, fax andphotocopy machinesNOTE: The successful candidate(s) for this position will besubject to a pre-employment background check.During the Influenza (“the flu”) season, as a condition ofemployment, The Johns Hopkins Institutions require all employeeswho provide ongoing services to patients or work in patient care orclinical care areas to have an annual influenza vaccination orpossess an approved medical or religious exception. Failure to meetthis requirement may result in termination of employment.The pre-employment physical for positions in clinical areas,laboratories, working with research subjects, or involvingcommunity contact requires documentation of immune status againstRubella (German measles), Rubeola (Measles), Mumps, Varicella(chickenpox), Hepatitis B and documentation of having received theTdap (Tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis) vaccination. This may includedocumentation of having two (2) MMR vaccines; two (2) Varicellavaccines; or antibody status to these diseases from laboratorytesting. Blood tests for immunities to these diseases areordinarily included in the pre-employment physical exam except forthose employees who provide results of blood tests or immunizationdocumentation from their own health care providers. Anyvaccinations required for these diseases will be given at no costin our Occupational Health office.This description is a general statement of required duties andresponsibilities performed on a regular and continuous basis. Itdoes not exclude other duties as assigned.Applications must include a cover letter and current CV, and areonly accepted online via Interfolio by clicking the “Apply Now”button on the upper right of your screen. This is a freeservice.If you are interested in applying for employment with The JohnsHopkins University and require special assistance or accommodationduring any part of the pre-employment process, please contact theSchool of Medicine HR Divisional Office at 410-955-2990. For TTYusers, call via Maryland Relay or dial 711.The Johns Hopkins University is committed to equal opportunity forits faculty, staff, and students. To that end, the university doesnot discriminate on the basis of sex, gender, marital status,pregnancy, race, color, ethnicity, national origin, age,disability, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity orexpression, veteran status or other legally protectedcharacteristic. The university is committed to providing qualifiedindividuals access to all academic and employment programs,benefits and activities on the basis of demonstrated ability,performance and merit without regard to personal factors that areirrelevant to the program involved.The successful candidate(s) for this position will be subject to apre-employment background check.If you are interested in applying for employment with The JohnsHopkins University and require special assistance or accommodationduring any part of the pre-employment process, please contact theHR Business Services Office at [email protected] For TTYusers, call via Maryland Relay or dial 711.The following additional provisions may apply depending on whichcampus you will work. Your recruiter will adviseaccordingly.During the Influenza (“the flu”) season, as a condition ofemployment, The Johns Hopkins Institutions require all employeeswho provide ongoing services to patients or work in patient care orclinical care areas to have an annual influenza vaccination orpossess an approved medical or religious exception. Failure to meetthis requirement may result in termination of employment.The pre-employment physical for positions in clinical areas,laboratories, working with research subjects, or involvingcommunity contact requires documentation of immune status againstRubella (German measles), Rubeola (Measles), Mumps, Varicella(chickenpox), Hepatitis B and documentation of having received theTdap (Tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis) vaccination. This may includedocumentation of having two (2) MMR vaccines; two (2) Varicellavaccines; or antibody status to these diseases from laboratorytesting. Blood tests for immunities to these diseases areordinarily included in the pre-employment physical exam except forthose employees who provide results of blood tests or immunizationdocumentation from their own health care providers. Anyvaccinations required for these diseases will be given at no costin our Occupational Health office.Equal Opportunity EmployerNote: Job Postings are updated daily and remain online untilfilled.EEO is the LawLearn more:https://www1.eeoc.gov/employers/upload/eeoc_self_print_poster.pdfImportant legal informationhttp://hrnt.jhu.edu/legal.cfmlast_img read more

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Ihor Ševčenko

first_imgWritten by John Duffy, Dumbarton Oaks Professor of Byzantine Philology and Literature and chair of the Department of the Classics at Harvard University. Ihor Ševčenko, the eminent Byzantinist and Dumbarton Oaks Professor of Byzantine History and Literature, Emeritus, died peacefully at his Cambridge home on Dec. 26 after eight months of failing health, just short of his 88th birthday.At Harvard he was a member of the Department of the Classics from 1973 to 1992, and associate director of the Ukrainian Research Institute from 1973 to 1989. A master of many Slavic and Western languages in their ancient, medieval, and modern forms, Ševčenko was known as a brilliant researcher in history, philology, and literature. Over a distinguished academic career, he held teaching or research appointments at 15 institutions, ranging from the University of California, Berkeley, to the University of Michigan in the United States, and from the Central European University of Budapest to the University of Oxford in Europe.Ševčenko was born of Ukrainian parents in early 1922 in Radość, a village in east-central Poland, not far from Warsaw. His father and mother, Ivan Ivanović and Maria Czerniatyńska Ševčenko, before emigrating to Warsaw, had been active in the Ukrainian national movement, and Ivan had been a department head in the Interior Ministry. In the Polish capital, the young Ševčenko attended the Adam Mickiewicz Gymnasium and Lycaeum, where he studied classical languages and probably others. Already as a teenager he had translated into Polish an extract from one of Voltaire’s works for a student journal.His first university studies were at the Deutsche Karlsuniversität in Prague, where he mastered Czech and German, and in 1945 he was granted a doctorate of philosophy in classical philology, ancient history, and comparative linguistics. During this period, he published a translation of George Orwell’s “Animal Farm” into Ukrainian. For that translation, intended for ordinary Ukrainians, including literate peasants, living in the camps for displaced persons in Germany following World War II, he was able to persuade Orwell to contribute an account of his own personal history and the backdrop to the dystopian novel.Ševčenko then migrated to Belgium, where he spent four years at the Université Catholique de Louvain, studying classical philology and Byzantinology. He received a degree as “docteur en philosophie et lettres” in 1949. He also participated in the seminar in Byzantine history presided over by Henri Grégoire in Brussels. Grégoire, the prodigiously productive and charismatic leader of Byzantine studies in Belgium, was to have a lasting impact on Ševčenko the scholar. Years later, he recalled that Grégoire’s seminars remained for him “among the most exciting of my intellectual experiences.” He also felt an undying gratitude toward the older man for having extended a hospitable hand in a time of need, to himself and others — “the homeless flotsam,” in Ševčenko’s words, left adrift in the aftermath of World War II.Ševčenko moved to the United States at the beginning of the 1950s as the result of an invitation from the famous medievalist Ernst Kantorowicz, and was given his first academic employment by the University of California, Berkeley, lecturing on ancient and Byzantine history. There, he met his first wife, Margaret Bentley. Following two years of fellowship and research in Washington, D.C., and Cambridge, Mass., he became an instructor in Slavic languages and literatures at the University of Michigan. The appointment soon turned into a professorial position from 1954 to ’57, for which his teaching duties included Slavic languages, old Russian literature, and Byzantine history. His next post was at Columbia University where, as an associate and then a full professor, he taught a spectrum of Byzantine and Slavic studies. Some of his first doctoral students came out of the Columbia years, 1957 to ’65.After a stint in 1960 as visiting scholar at Dumbarton Oaks in Washington, D.C., the mecca for Byzantine studies in North America, he began a close association with the Harvard institution that was to last the rest of his life. In 1965 he was invited to join the resident senior scholars there, and he spent the next eight years in the idyllic Georgetown setting, with a glorious library at his fingertips, and surrounded each year by different coteries of researchers on fellowships, as well as by a succession of the most distinguished Byzantinists visiting from Europe. His stay there overlapped for a number of years with the residency of Cyril Mango, another giant of Byzantinology. Here the two friends presided over the center’s intellectual life, sometimes daunting but generally dazzling the junior fellows in particular. On the down-to-earth side, Ševčenko and his second wife, the art historian Nancy Patterson Ševčenko, provided the relaxing highlight of each week by hosting on Wednesday evenings an open house party for the Dumbarton Oaks community.In 1973, Ševčenko made his last major academic move, from Washington to Cambridge, to become the Dumbarton Oaks Professor of Byzantine History and Literature at Harvard, as a member of the Department of the Classics. He taught medieval Greek courses, offered seminars on Byzantine literature and paleography, and trained graduate students. He was co-editor of “Harvard Ukrainian Studies,” which he helped to found. And he was an active member of the Ukrainian Research Institute, which he helped to establish in 1973, until his retirement in 1992.As a scholar, Ševčenko shared an unusual number of similarities — some hardly accidental — with his intellectual mentor, Grégoire: expertise in a remarkable range of Western and Slavic languages; a scholar’s basis in classical philology; student wanderings to several countries; exploratory travels for manuscripts in libraries and inscriptions on site; and a gift for astute, off-the-cuff ideas and conjectures.Mango, one of the most astute readers of Ševčenko, in his comparison of Grégoire and Ševčenko included “a multiplicity of enthusiasms that have prevented both men from writing big books.” On the occasion of the 1984 Festschrift for his one-time colleague at Dumbarton Oaks, Mango expressed the wish for “a book on Byzantium and the Slavs, and perhaps another on Byzantine hagiography, or a least a long and thoughtful article on each.” Over the course of Ševčenko’s career, no book-length narratives were produced, but in rich compensation there were large collected volumes containing a wealth of important articles, some long, all thoughtful, and each an eye-opener for the thoroughness of the scholarship and the vividness of its presentation.For extensive studies there was, at the beginning, the doctoral monograph on two 14th century statesmen and literati, Theodore Metochites and Nikephoros Choumnos, finally published in 1962; and at the end, almost ready for the printer after more than 20 years of careful preparation, there was a critical edition and translation of a seminal biography composed in the 10th century, “The Life of Emperor Basil I.” Among the articles and essays were many standouts. For instance, there was the enlightening and entertaining essay on “Two Varieties of Historical Writing” in which a magisterial Ševčenko compared the “vivid” and the “technical” historian, or, using his more colorful terms, the “butterfly” and the “caterpillar.” There was the widely read and appreciated “The Decline of Byzantium Seen Through the Eyes of Its Intellectuals,” in the Dumbarton Oaks Papers of 1961. In the same journal in 1971, there was the stunning piece of detective work, “The Date and Author of the So-Called Fragments of Toparcha Gothicus,” in which he surgically unmasked scholarly fraud perpetrated by a 19th century Hellenist and paleographer, the Franco-German Karl Benedikt Hase. There is an impressive 1995 overview of studies in one of his favorite genres, biographies of saints, titled “Observations on the Study of Byzantine Hagiography in the Last Half-Century, or Two Looks Back and One Look Forward.” His collected Byzantine papers were issued in two volumes, while his contributions over a lifetime to Byzantino-Slavic and Ukrainian cultural and historical matters were likewise published in two volumes.Ševčenko was president of the Association Internationale des Études Byzantines from 1986 to ’96, and the breadth of his scholarship and accomplishments received further recognition in multiple honorary doctorates, as well as membership in numerous learned societies. Research and literary prizes came his way from Germany (the Alexander von Humboldt Stiftung) and Ukraine (L’viv and Kyiv). The title of the first of two Festschriften produced in his honor, “Okeanos” (1984), captured the vastness of his learning. (Appropriately, it borrowed the sobriquet of a very large manuscript, called “The Ocean,” in a monastery on Mt. Athos containing an encyclopedic collection of texts dealing with the sciences, literature, philosophy, and theology.) In his written self-presentation, he liked to end the long list of his achievements and honors with the modest notice, at once heartfelt and humorous, “His hobby is trout fishing.” In the epitaph, which he composed in Latin a few years ago, he said of himself: “Over a long life he witnessed very many deaths; his own, therefore, he did not fear.”He is survived by his two daughters, Catherine and Elisabeth; three grandchildren; former wives Oksana Draj-Xmara Asher and Nancy Patterson Ševčenko; and numerous students, colleagues, and friends.Interment took place during a private service at Mount Auburn Cemetery in Cambridge. Plans are pending for a public memorial service to be held at Harvard in early February. In lieu of flowers, donations are being accepted to establish an endowment in his name to award travel grants to students in Byzantine and premodern Slavic studies. (For details, visit https://sites.google.com/site/ihorsevcenko/donations.)last_img read more

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GMP orders wind turbines for Lowell project

first_imgGreen Mountain Power Corp,Vestas has received a 65 MW order from Green Mountain Power for 21, V112-3.0 MW wind turbines for the Kingdom Community Wind project near Lowell, Vermont, USA. This is the first order for V112-3.0 MW turbines in North America.The contract includes delivery and commissioning, and a 15-year service and maintenance agreement. Delivery is scheduled for mid- 2012 and commissioning is expected by the end of 2012.‘The V112-3.0 MW turbine features our latest technologies and is designed for wind speeds such as those found in this particular area,’ said Martha Wyrsch, President of Vestas-American Wind Technology, Inc. ‘Because of its large swept area, the turbine delivers high productivity. It’s designed for improved rotor efficiency, reliability and serviceability. We look forward to working with our new customer, Green Mountain Power, to install the first Vestas turbines in Vermont.’The V112-3.0 MW includes a new blade profile, nacelle design and cooling-system to maximize electricity generation. It also features GridStreamerâ ¢ technology that provides high, stable plant output that complies with most stringent grid requirements worldwide.This order will become the first manufacturing project for Vestas’ blade factory in Brighton, Colorado, which will focus on building 55-meter blades for the V112-3.0 MW. Vestas’ newest manufacturing facility is expected to begin blade production in late 2011. Vestas has three other Colorado factories ‘ a facility in Windsor that produces 44- and 49-meter blades, a tower factory in Pueblo and a nacelle-assembly factory in Brighton.For the Kingdom Community Wind project, the service agreement includes Vestas’ Active Output Management (AOM) 4000 maintenance program. The AOM 4000 program includes all planned and unplanned maintenance services along with continuous remote monitoring and surveillance of the project via the VestasOnline® SCADA system.Once finished, the Kingdom Community Wind project will provide enough electricity to power more than 24,000 Vermont homes. It also will create jobs in construction and turbine maintenance.For more information on the V112-3.0 MW turbine, visit V112.vestas.com.About VestasVestas is the world leader in supplying high-tech wind power systems, and a preferred provider of wind turbines, services and solutions in North America. Since 1979, Vestas has an industry-leading installed base of more than 44,000 wind turbines in 66 countries. Vestas, which employs more than 3,000 people in the United States, sold its first wind turbine in North America in 1981 and since has supplied more than 12,000 in North America. Vestas’ North American manufacturing operations are located in Colorado while its technology research centers are in Texas, Massachusetts and Colorado. Vestas’ North American headquarters is located in Portland, Ore., while its global headquarters is in Randers, Denmark.About Green Mountain PowerGreen Mountain Power generates, transmits, distributes and sells electricity in Vermont and is a leader in wind and solar generation. It serves more than 96,000 customers.Learn more at www.greenmountainpower.com(link is external).Vestas. 10.6.2011last_img read more

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Trio Charged With Brentwood Fatal Shooting

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Three men have been indicted for allegedly shooting two men during a fight outside a bar in Brentwood last year, killing one of the victims, a 47-year-old man, Suffolk County prosecutors said.Randis Peralta and Brandon Solar, both 23 of Brentwood, and 30-year-old Donald Bangs of Bay Shore pleaded not guilty Wednesday at Suffolk County court to charges of manslaughter, gang assault and gun charges. Peralta also pleaded not guilty to second-degree murder.Prosecutors said the trio was involved in gunning down Cleon Norwood, who was shot in the stomach at 4:45 a.m. on Sept. 21, 2013 in the parking lot of the Aura Lounge. The victim died of his wounds at Southside Hospital in Bay Shore in February.Judge William Condon set bail for Peralta at $1 million cash or $2 million bond. Bail for Bangs and Solar was set at and $500,000 cash or $1 million bond. They are due back in court Jan. 12.last_img read more

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Lakers GM Mitch Kupchak retains high hopes for this season

first_img“One thing he’s going to do is hold players accountable,” Kupchak said of Scott. “Much has been made of his desire to improve the team defensively, and I think he will do that.” Kupchak still conceded some doubts. Despite the Lakers selecting Randle with their seventh overall pick, Kupchak expressed uncertainty how he will fare his rookie season. Kupchak suggested the Lakers may “go small,” considering their glut of power forwards does not feature anyone listed above seven feet. Of course, pre-season optimism on the health of Bryant and Nash could sour.Yet, Kupchak noted how the Lakers began and ended their 2007-08 season differently. It started with Bryant demanding a trade the previous offseason and ended with the Lakers acquiring Pau Gasol in a mid-season trade from Memphis, which pushed them into an NBA Finals loss against Boston. “Our expectations are to win a championship,” Kupchak said. “The expectations outside of this room might not be the same.” Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error Too many circumstances have happened that make the Lakers’ championship banners hanging on the wall overseeing the team’s practice facility seem like a distant memory.The Lakers are a season removed from finishing with a 25-57 record, their worst season in L.A. franchise history. The Lakers struck out this offseason in pursuing high-level free agents LeBron James and Carmelo Anthony. The injury bug severely affected Kobe Bryant (left Achilles tendon, left knee) and Steve Nash (nerve irritation in back/hamstrings). The Lakers ranked near the bottom in almost every defensive category.So what does Lakers general manager Mitch Kupchak say to his team when it begins training camp Tuesday?“You’re always going into the season expecting to win a championship,” Kupchak said Friday at the Lakers’ practice facility in El Segundo. “That’s how we feel and that’s how our players have to feel. They have to do their job, coaches have to do their job and I have to do my job.”center_img Plenty of work awaits, which Kupchak said starts with ensuring that Bryant, Nash and veteran forward Carlos Boozer stay healthy.Kupchak suggested that has already taken place. He noted feeling “a little more apprehensive” with Nash since he has missed a combined 99 games in the past two years, partly because of recurring nerve damage in his back and hamstrings. But Kupchak reported Nash “feels the best he’s felt,” at least enough to play in five-on-five scrimmages and even two-a-day training sessions. Bryant has worked out at the Lakers’ practice facility in recent weeks “with no ill effects on either injury.”Kupchak also predicted Bryant “will have an excellent year,” arguing that a drop in 10-12 pounds could offset any loss in explosiveness. Kupchak also believes Bryant has enough left to replicate his play of two seasons ago in which he averaged 27.3 points on 46.3 percent shooting, six assists and 5.6 rebounds before rupturing his left Achilles tendon in mid-April, 2013.“He gives you a chance no matter the circumstances to be really good,” said Kupchak, who envisioned Bryant equally scoring and facilitating. “He’ll be very effective. I’m not going to predict what his statistics will be, but I don’t think for a second that if we needed 30 or 35 (points) from him one night that he couldn’t get that. I think he can get that.”What if Bryant and Nash cannot stay healthy? Kupchak said “we’ve kept that in mind” as he’s compiled a roster that includes Boozer, Jordan Hill, rookies Julius Randle and Jordan Clarkson, Jeremy Lin, Nick Young, Wesley Johnson and Ed Davis. Kupchak even argued the roster is “deep enough” to become an elite defensive team coached under Byron Scott. last_img read more

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