RSF index 2021: regional analysis

first_img June 4, 2021 Find out more June 8, 2021 Find out more Europe – Central AsiaMiddle East – North Africa Asia – PacificAfricaAmericas Condemning abusesReports and statisticsOnline freedomsMedia independenceProtecting sources Freedom of expressionPredators News Receive email alerts April 17, 2021 – Updated on April 22, 2021 RSF index 2021: regional analysis Follow the news on Europe – Central Asia News Help by sharing this information RSF calls for a fully transparent investigation after mine kills two journalists in Azerbaijan Europe – Central AsiaMiddle East – North Africa Asia – PacificAfricaAmericas Condemning abusesReports and statisticsOnline freedomsMedia independenceProtecting sources Freedom of expressionPredators center_img “We’ll hold Ilham Aliyev personally responsible if anything happens to this blogger in France” RSF says RSF_en News News to go further June 7, 2021 Find out more Organisation Respect judicial independence in cases of two leading journalists in Serbia and Montenegro, RSF says RSF 2021 Index: Covid makes African journalism more vulnerable than everWith reporters attacked and arrested, their incomes falling and media undermined by disinformation and draconian laws, the coronavirus pandemic has compounded the huge difficulties for journalism in sub-Saharan Africa, where 23 of the 48 countries (two more than in 2020) are now marked as red or black on the World Press Freedom map, meaning the situation is classified as bad or very bad.Lire la suiteRSF 2021 Index: Journalism under constant pressure in North AfricaAs a result of constant harassment of journalists and media in North Africa, three of the region’s countries – Morocco, Algeria and Libya – continue to be marked red or black on the World Press Freedom map because their situation is ranked as “bad” or “very bad,” although their citizens continue to demand more press freedom and access to information, as they have been doing since the 2011 Arab Spring.World press freedom index 2021ICIRead MoreRSF 2021 Index: North America: a mixed prognosis for press freedomThe 2021 Index points to worrying vital signs for press freedom in North America despite slight improvements — notably in Canada, which climbed two spots from 16 in 2020 to 14 this year, and in the United States, which moved up one place from 45th in 2020 to 44th this year.Read MoreRSF 2021 Index: Nearly all indicators flashing red in Latin AmericaThe Reporters Without Borders (RSF) 2021 World Press Freedom Index shows decline across the board in Latin America. With a few exceptions, the coronavirus crisis has exacerbated an already complex and hostile environment for journalists.Read MoreRSF 2021 Index: Censorship and disinformation virus hits Asia-PacificThe region’s authoritarian regimes have used the Covid-19 pandemic to perfect their methods of totalitarian control of information, while the “dictatorial democracies” have used it as a pretext for imposing especially repressive legislation with provisions combining propaganda and suppression of dissent. The behaviour of the region’s few real democracies have meanwhile shown that journalistic freedom is the best antidote to disinformation.Read MoreRSF 2021 Index: No antidote to disinformation, media control virus in Eastern Europe and Central AsiaThe Covid-19 pandemic’s lasting impact on press freedom, unprecedented crackdowns on reporters covering protests, and a war in the Caucasus, in which at least seven journalists were injured and reporting was obstructed, all helped to keep Eastern Europe and Central Asia in second from last position in the 2021 Index’s ranking of regions.Read MoreRSF 2021 Index: Covid-19, latest ailment to afflict Middle East’s moribund mediaWhile exacerbating public discontent in the Middle East, the Covid-19 pandemic has also highlighted the worrying state of its media, which are slowly being killed off by repressive policies. The region continues to have 12 countries marked in red or black on the World Press Freedom map, signalling that the situation is bad or very bad. The conspicuous absence of change in these countries is reflected in the lack of significant movement in the Index.Read MoreRSF 2021 Index: EU struggles to defend values at homeEurope continues to be the most favourable continent for press freedom but violence against journalists has increased, and the mechanisms the European Union established to protect fundamental freedoms have yet to loosen Viktor Orbán’s grip on Hungary’s media or halt the draconian measures being taken in other central European countries.Read MoreREAD THE GENERAL ANALYSIS last_img read more

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Leising: Bill to help prevent opioid abuse passes committee

first_imgIndianapolis, In. — A bill sponsored by Republican state senator from Oldenburg, Jean Leising that would help prevent opioid abuse in Indiana passed the Senate Committee on Health and Provider Services unanimously.House Bill 1295 would allow a veterinarian to obtain information about an animal’s owner from INSPECT, Indiana’s prescription monitoring system, before prescribing an opioid for the animal. The bill would also limit the initial opioid prescription a veterinarian could prescribe to an animal to a seven-day supply.“In some cases, animal owners suffering from addiction are using their sick or injured pets to ‘doctor shop’ in order to obtain opioids,” Leising said. “If passed, this bill would help ensure these medications are being used properly and not feeding the drug abuse epidemic facing Indiana.”HB 1295 will now move to the full Senate for further consideration.last_img read more

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Syracuse basketball recruiting: SU reportedly offers 2017 guard Hamidou Diallo

first_img Published on September 23, 2015 at 10:12 am Contact Chris: [email protected] | @ChrisLibonati Syracuse has offered Class of 2017, five-star guard Hamidou Diallo, SNY.tv’s Adam Zagoria reported on Wednesday morning.Diallo has also been offered by Kansas, Florida, Villanova, Louisville and UConn, among others, according to Zagoria. The 6-foot-4 guard averaged 17.8 points, 6.9 rebounds and 2.2 assists per game last season for Bowne (New York) High School. In the offseason, Diallo transferred to Putnam (Connecticut) Science Academy. Scout.com ranks Diallo as the 15th-best player in the Class of 2017 and the second-best shooting guard in the class.SU has offered eight players in the Class of 2017, including two guards, Trevon Duval and Quade Green, per Scout. Duval and Green are ranked as the third- and 41st-best players in the Class of 2017, respectively, but both are listed as point guards. Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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‘We are all Koulibaly’: Napoli fans don masks to support racism victim

first_imgShare on: WhatsApp Milan, Italy | AFP | Thousands of Napoli fans showed their support for Senegalese defender Kalidou Koulibaly who was subjected to racist chanting at Inter Milan in midweek by wearing masks and holding up his picture before their team’s Serie A game against Bologna on Saturday.Posters with the message “Siamo Tutti Koulibaly” (“We are all Koulibaly”) were visible throughout the Stadio San Paolo during the game which the hosts won 3-2.Napoli’s French-born player Koulibaly was targeted by monkey noises and racist chants at the San Siro on Wednesday, before being sent off for sarcastically applauding the referee.Serie A returned to action three days after the violent clashes in Milan during which an Inter supporter died after being hit by a car.And fans showed their solidarity with Koulibaly, wearing masks with the player’s face, as well as t-shirts bearing his name.The home fans also displayed a banner on front of the stadium, “We are all Koulibaly: no to racism!,” with fliers in the stadium “Koulibaly big brother” or “We’re with you Kalidou”.Among them a very young fan held up a poster with: “I’m small, but a man like Koulibaly”.On the pitch, Napoli’s Algerian defender Faouzi Ghoulam wore Koulibaly’s number 26 shirt in warm-up with the Senegalese player suspended after his sending off on Wednesday.“It doesn’t matter the colour of the skin. It doesn’t matter religion. It doesn’t matter what team you’re rooting for. Football, like all sports, is a game. And all the games are passion, fun, freedom: And in freedom we are all alike! Tomorrow we will all be koulibaly!,” Ghoulam tweeted before the match.European football governing body UEFA said that the correct anti-racism protocol had not been followed during the midweek game.And Napoli coach Carlo Ancelotti said Saturday they would have been in favour of the match being suspended temporarily. “There was a bit of confusion after Milan, we never asked for the suspension, but three times a temporary interruption.“UEFA confirmed that we are right, it surprises me that the president of the referees federation disagrees.“I hope it will never happen again or we will walk off the pitch.”Ancelotti added: “50,000 people calling Koulibaly’s name is quite a show, there has been a good feeling throughout the city.“Kalidou is very popular, he has had messages from many sportsmen and it is a sign that it is not so difficult to improve things.”Meanwhile, there were also banners before Saturday’s match between Parma and Roma in memory of 39-year-old Inter Milan supporter Daniele Belardinelli, who was killed during the pre-match clashes.“Ciao Dede” and “an ultra never dies, Daniele with us” were two of the banners remembering Belardinelli who had been banned from the San Siro between 2007 and 2017 for violence.last_img read more

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CBA Returns to Cross Country Nationals

first_imgBy Tim Morris |Even before Troy Hill followed his brother Brian to Christian Brothers Academy, they had talked about going to the Nike Cross Nationals together.And now, it is no longer talk. On Nov. 25 in Wappingers Falls, New York, the Hill brothers helped CBA, competing as Brothers XC Club, qualify for the Dec. 2 Nationals in Portland, Oregon, after finishing second at the Nike Cross Nationals Northeast Regional at Bowdoin Park.The Colts were second to Connecticut’s Xavier Distance, 112-123, in the Boys Championship race. Only two teams from the Regional advanced to the nationals.“That’s (Nike Nationals) been the goal,” said Brian, a senior. “It’s special to have a brother to go with. It’s definitely big.”Troy, a sophomore, noted the Hill brothers take their running very serious and going to the nationals together is a product of that dedication. Troy also noted his brother is the poster boy for serious runners.“It’s great to be going to the nationals together,” Troy said. “He’s (Brian) such a hard-working person and he’s been a great leader on the team.”Troy said that without his brother he wouldn’t be the runner he’s become.“I am where I am today because of him,” he remarked.For his part, Brian admires his younger brother’s drive.“He’s very self-motivated,” the older Hill pointed out.It was Brian, as he has all year, who led CBA at the Regional. He finished in eighth place overall and seventh for team scoring covering the 5K layout in 16:23.7. With that eighth place, he earned Second Team All-Northeast East honors.Completing CBA’s scoring were: Luke Reid (16:39.5), Tim McInerney (16:45.0), Ryan Miele (17:02.3) and Troy Hill (17:06.2). In team scoring they were 11-19-40-46.Brian Hill noted that while the Colts were disappointed in not repeating as Regional champions, he added that “ultimately the Regional is a qualifier” and that’s what CBA did, qualify for the Nike Cross Nationals.This is the ninth straight year that the Colts have qualified for the Nationals. The Colts won it all back in 2011 and finished second in 2013. They were seventh last fall.Brian Hill said having been there before is plus. He noted that there are many distractions that can take a team’s mind off the race itself. First time participants don’t’ always handle different distractions well.“Experience is definitely an advantage,” said Brian.While she isn’t going to Portland, Middletown South’s Maddie Brand nevertheless had a “great time” at the Regional. The Eagle senior finished seventh in the Girls Championship race earning First Team All-Northeast Regional recognition for her effort (19:04.5).“I’m really, really happy with my race,” she said. “I’m so thrilled with how my senior season ended.“I was disappointed in how I ran at the Meet of Champions and that’s not the way I wanted to end it (season). I wanted to make my last race great,” she added.Brand had never run the Bowdoin Park course before and believed it ended up helping her. “I thought it kind of helped me not knowing what to expect,” she explained.What Brand quickly learned was the narrowness of the course making it difficult to pass runners. At two miles, Brand found herself in 13th place and proceeded to “start picking people off.”She finished strong moving up to seventh place making the Regional First Team.Brand wasn’t just happy for herself. “The team did awesome finishing in 10th place,” she pointed out. “We started the season with the goal of finishing in the top 10 in the state and we ended up finishing 10th in the Northeast.” South ultimately finished fourth at the Meet of Champions.Brand pointed out that the Eagles, competing as Middletown South XC, took a relaxed approach to the race and it paid off. “We didn’t put pressure on ourselves,” she said. “We wanted to go out and have fun and enjoy our last race together.”Kathleen Shay, a junior, and South’s number two harrier, finished 26th overall helping the Eagles to their 10th place (277).Red Bank Regional’s Charlotte Cochrane is another senior who finished her scholastic career in style. She finished 29th (19:51.7) one week after joining Brand on the medal podium at the Meet of Champions.Red Bank Catholic, which competed as Runners High Racing Club, ended its season on a high finishing eighth (259). Maddy Kopec (20:11.4) and Bridget Byrne (20:25.2) led the Caseys taking 22-31 in team scoring.Colts Neck, the Group 3 state champions, hoping to be among the Region’s best teams, had to run without their top runner, Colleen Megerle, who was ill. Delia Russo led the Cougars, who were 22nd (484) in 33rd (20:26.4).This article was first published in the Nov. 30. -Dec. 7, 2017 print edition of The Two River Times.last_img read more

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