Hulaween’s Co-Founder Curates Exciting Playlist & Shares His Love For The Festival

first_imgThe first time I stepped into the Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park was circa 2009, when our now partner and dear friend Paul Levine of Purple Hat hosted Jennifer Hartswick and I as an acoustic duo version of Van Ghost for Bear Creek Music Festival. Right away, I knew the park was special. I was stricken by its natural beauty & energy, and started dreaming of how & when the Silver Wrapper team could contribute to the incredible history, community and portfolio of events held there in the future. Fast forward to 2012, Paul and I were both on Jam Cruise talking about how to bring that dream to fruition, and by the following year of 2013, the first Suwannee Hulaween was alive and on the map.The original ethos between Leif, Paul and I was to create an experiential event & curated concert that all three of us would want to attend, even if we weren’t producing it. Our goal was to stay true to our roots in the jam band world, and also cater to the diverse music fanatics we consider ourselves. We set out to program a show with music that would compliment the String Cheese Incident (and their team), who graciously invited us to turn their annual Halloween show (which had previously bounced around the country for over a decade), into a full blown annual festival for a 3 year plan at the same site. We knew that if it didn’t take off by that point with this country’s chaotic and murky waters in the festival space, it wasn’t meant to be. As the story unfolded, each year the crowd sizes, the musical line up, and Spirit Lake (our dedicated space to transform the forest around the lake in the middle of the campgrounds with world class art installations), outgrew the year before it.   Going into this year’s fourth installment of Hulaween, we are beyond humbled and grateful at the insane level of artists & fans’ loyalty to our vision for the show, the park, and community we’ve deemed the #HulaFam. It’s truly like nothing else any of us have ever experienced in our careers, and we plan to continue the tradition for as long as we are capable of with a passion to always improve upon the overall fan experience on every level from the year before it. This year, we are capping the sales to only 20,000 fans, with again, an expanded Spirit Lake. We are also adding a brand new stage into an area that has never been used in the park. We programmed what we consider to be a perfectly balanced line-up of progressive and relevant musical artists while staying true to our roots and fanbase that helped grow Hulaween into this beautiful creature it has become. I put together this playlist of over 50 songs and nearly four hours of music for your listening pleasure to take an audible journey into the different sounds you’ll be able to catch around the park all weekend from the headliners down to some of the pre-party acts. Play it from top to bottom, or on shuffle as Hula-Radio. Please enjoy it, share with your music loving crew, and plan to join us for what is sure to be another magical Halloween party in Northern FL this October!With gratitude, love, & respect from our whole family,Michael BergYou can check out the full Suwannee Hulaween lineup below, and head here to purchase tickets!last_img read more

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Sacred Heart coach Bike searches for 1st NCAA Tournament appearance in 35th season

first_img Published on February 26, 2013 at 1:21 am Contact Phil: [email protected] | @PhilDAbb Facebook Twitter Google+ Dave Bike has never met Jim Boeheim face to face, but of course he knows who he is. Boeheim is the only head coach in the country who’s been at one school longer than Bike has.“I said, ‘You know, I could see myself staying for a long time at a place like Sacred Heart,’” Bike said, looking back on the beginning of his coaching career. “I’ve been pretty content to come to work and enjoy coaching and enjoy the game.”Now in his 35th year as the Pioneers’ head coach, Bike is the second longest tenured head coach in Division I. Bike has reveled and struggled in his share of highs and lows, from winning the 1986 Division-II national championship, to the program’s difficult transition to the Division-I level.As the 65-year-old approaches the soon-looming end of his coaching career, the Pioneers (9-18, 7-9 Northeast Conference) are striving for their first Division-I NCAA Tournament appearance, a berth the team would like to clinch before Bike walks away.“This is my last year and my last opportunity to do so myself,” said senior guard Shane Gibson. “It would be great if my team was the first team to take him there. It’d be something he would never forget.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textNow at 529 victories, Bike began this season ranked 20th in wins among active NCAA coaches. He coached his 1,000th game in the Pioneers’ season-opener.Bike admits his career is not far from running its course, but Johnny Kidd, his assistant coach for 13 seasons, said Bike is capable of coaching for much longer.“He can coach as long as he wants, because the guy has a sharp mind,” Kidd said. “He takes care of all the financials – travel, things like that. Most head coaches don’t do that. He does that, and I think that’s what keeps him sharp. He is very meticulous to the penny.”But before Bike was a basketball coach, he had a career in another sport.Bike was an All-New England and All-state basketball selection, and standout baseball player at Notre Dame High School in Fairfield, Conn., but turned down a scholarship to play both sports at Fordham.After the Detroit Tigers drafted him in the eighth round of the 1965 Amateur Draft, he signed a contract, intrigued by the chance to make the majors and the salary that would accompany it.“I always liked basketball better,” Bike said. “But what happened was that I thought that I had a better chance to make the big time in baseball than I did in basketball. Wow, if I did that for five months work, making $7,500 a year, what a life that could bring. Times have changed, huh?”The 6-foot-4 catcher spent eight years in the minor leagues, mostly at Single-A, and reached the Tigers’ major league roster once, he said. In Detroit’s farm system, Bike said, he “went from a prospect to a reject to a suspect” after coming in with high expectations and enduring a “disastrous” slump in 1968.So, when baseball didn’t pan out, Bike knew he could go back to his favorite sport.“I think in sports, to stop playing or stop coaching is the hardest thing to do, to retire in sports,” Bike said. “So being a little bit disenchanted at the time, I decided to retire from baseball and pursue basketball.After four seasons as an assistant coach at Seattle, Bike returned home to Fairfield and SHU – which now includes the building in which he attended high school, he said – in 1978, and hasn’t left since.Bike’s tenure hit rock bottom from 1999-2006, the program’s first seven years at the Division-I level, during which the Pioneers struggled to a 54-141 mark. But the positives of Bike’s 35-year career severely outweigh the hardships.In the 1985-86 campaign, Bike garnered coach of the year honors after leading the Pioneers to a 30-4 record and a national championship – “the highlight” of his career. Also among Bike’s favorites were the regional championships SHU won in the 1980s, all on the road, Bike said, because the Pioneers’ gym was too small to host the four-team tournament.Bike doesn’t know exactly when he will put down the drawing board and call it a career, but he appreciates the experiences he’s had thus far.“It’s been a good run. I enjoyed the university itself. I watched it grow,” Bike said. “I watched the change from Division II to Division I, watched it change from a commuter school to now a very comprehensive university. Like my wife always says, ‘You find a job you like, you never have to work a day in your life.’“Well, I found a job I like, I found a place I love and it’s been a good ride.” Commentslast_img read more

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A new approach to tissue sampling

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Ty Higgins, Ohio Ag NetThroughout the 2018 growing season, AgriGold agronomist John Brien has been working with farmers to do something a little unorthodox. He is having producers send in tissue samples on a weekly basis.“Traditionally, tissue sampling has a negative tone to it because no one has been able to correlate that if you have this certain level of something at this certain time, you’re going to get this certain yield, so many academia and agronomists have come to the conclusion that tissue sampling is not important,” Brien said. “But we have taken a different approach and we are systematically tissue sampling, once every week so we can get trend lines. I’m not worried about spikes or valleys. I am worried about the general trend of nutrients in that plant.”The end goal, according to Brien, is to see if growers are getting enough nutrients to the plant at any given point of the season or if there are big holes somewhere that need to be addressed to fix the production system, offering a different mindset to see what this type of tissue sampling can offer. One discovery this project has made is that some nutrients are being used by the crop at some points in the growing season and some are not, meaning some applications may be a waste of time and money.“We always assume that if we put a nutrient out there that the plant is using it,” Brien said. “We have done studies and trials with these tissue samples where we applied nutrients at different times and the plant never took them up. It was too late for that plant to use it so the farmer wasted a large amount of money.”Take potassium, for instance.“We noticed that if you don’t have potassium in the plant by V5 or V6, there is no way to drive the nutrient levels back up because you are on a downward trend and corn is using that nutrient up very rapidly right up to pollination,” Brien said. “If you wait until V10 or V11, you’re just putting potassium on for next year’s crop and that opened our eyes to realize that we have to have potassium on early and in big amounts.”It is standard procedure to put manganese on soybeans after seeing some yellowing after a Roundup application, but tissue samples from this project are coming back deficient or low on manganese.Brien is also noticing lower than expected levels of boron when tissue results return. He wonders if there is some low lying fruit with these two nutrients that can be useful for higher yields in the future.Sending in a tissue sample weekly will likely sound extreme for most producers, but Brien says doing it a little more often may be advantageous.“I think of tissue sample as just another agronomic tool,” Brien said. “So, if you are at your wit’s end on management and you just can’t figure out how to get to the next level, additional tissue sampling should come into play. If once a week is too much, try every other week. If you are really dedicated and want to spend more time with tissue sampling, that tells me you are serious about raising good crops.”last_img read more

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Appeals Court Finds Attorney-Client Privilege Doesn’t Cover Work Emails

first_imgWhy Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Attorney-client privilege does not extend to emails sent from a work email account, a California Court of Appeals has ruled. The unanimous decision was handed down by the Third Appellate District Court in Sacramento last week.The court’s decision means that a company has a right to access any email sent via a company computer – so use caution, perhaps, when using your work email account to consult with an attorney about suing your employer. These emails, writes the court, “were akin to consulting her lawyer in her employer’s conference room, in a loud voice, with the door open, so that any reasonable person would expect that their discussion of her complaints about her employer would be overheard .”There have been a number of important legal decisions recently about privacy and email. The New Jersey Supreme Court, for example, found that email sent from a personal web-based email account was private, provided that usage wasn’t covered by a company policy. But the U.S. Supreme Court found last summer that a police officer’s texts on department pagers were not private.Last week’s decision involved a secretary who sued her employer for wrongful termination. Her employer introduced some of her emails between she and her attorney in the court case, arguing that her attorney had urged her to file the suit. She had appealed the decision, arguing the emails should not have been admissible in court.The decision last week by the appeals court said that these emails were not confidential as her company had an explicit policy about company email, stating that it was for company business only and was not private.Photo credits: Flickr user Brian Turner Related Posts Tags:#biz#tips center_img audrey watters Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

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CITY COUNCIL INTERVIEWS CONTINUE

first_imgThe City Council of Sioux City held a second round of interviews Monday to fill the seat vacated by Keith Radig.The position opened when Radig was elected to the Woodbury County Board of Supervisors.Former councilman Jason Geary, who currently serves on the city’s Planning and Zoning Commission is among the fourteen people who have applied to fill the seat:Audio Playerhttp://kscj.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/APS4.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.OC……….LOOK AHEAD. ;13Tom Venesky has run unsuccessfully for the council three previous times.He serves on the city Transit Board and told the council members that buses should run into the evening in Sioux City:Audio Playerhttp://kscj.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/APS5.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.OC…..HOME FROM WORK. :1628 year old Jake Jungers is a private citizen who says he wants to see the council and private business work together:Audio Playerhttp://kscj.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/APS6.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.OC……JOBS LOCALLY. :15Carlos Venable-Ridley says he wants to see better diversity representation on the council:Audio Playerhttp://kscj.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/APS7.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.OC………..APPLICATION IN. :10The council will announce their choice on February 27th.last_img read more

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10 months agoHughton pleased with Brighton attacking options

first_imgAbout the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your say Hughton pleased with Brighton attacking optionsby Freddie Taylor10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveChris Hughton is happy with the attacking players at his disposal.The Brighton manager knows they will have to be at their best to stay in the league this season.And he believes that he has enough options in attack to make that happen.Hughton said to The Argus: “It’s what I want [competition for places]. Florin, I thought, had done really well in the game he came on in (Crystal Palace) and the game he started at Huddersfield.”I didn’t think he did so well in the last game at Burnley but that might have been a consequence of having not played and having a big impact in the two games before.”Of course, we’ve got Glenn who has scored goals.”But that’s what I want. I think it’s good and Locadia as well, who will feel aggrieved he hasn’t played more.”We will need that type of competition going into the second half of the season.”Brighton are 13th in the table, nine points away from the bottom three places. last_img read more

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Winning Shipping to Expand Fleet with Capesize Bulker

first_imgzoom China’s shipping firm Winning Shipping has reached an agreement to buy a 180,200 dwt Capesize vessel, the Yuritamou, according to data provided by VesselsValue.The company is buying the second-hand vessel from Japan-based Doun Kisen for a price of USD 23 million.The Capesize was constructed at Japanese Imabari Shipbuilding and handed over to its owner in January 2007.VesselsValue data shows that the 289-meter-long ship has a market value of USD 21.2 million.The Panama-flagged bulker will become a part of Winning Shipping’s current fleet of over 30 bulk carriers with a total size of more than 5.3 million dwt.World Maritime News Stafflast_img read more

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Du Plessis misses out De Kock to lead SA in T20s against

first_imgJohannesburg: Quinton de Kock on Tuesday was named South Africa’s new Twenty20 skipper for the three-match series against India in September, which will not feature former captain Faf Du Plessis in the squad. However, du Plessis will continue to lead South Africa in the three-Test series that follows the T20s, with Temba Bavuma named his vice-captain, Cricket South Africa announced. “I would like to stress that Faf du Plessis remains an important part of our plans for white-ball cricket,” said CSA Acting Director, Corrie van Zyl. Rassie van Der Dussen will play deputy to de Kock in the T20 squad. “The T20 Series gives us the last chance to have a look at our leadership and batting options as the next edition of the T20 World Cup is now little more than a year away which is why we have gone with an inexperienced leadership group. This is our last chance to do this before we settle on an established squad,” he added. Also Read – Puducherry on top after 8-wkt win over ChandigarhMeanwhile, both T20 and Test squads will feature three uncapped players. Pacer Anrich Nortje features in both the squads, batsman Bavuma, spin bowling all-rounder Bjorn Fortuin will feature in the T20 squad. Wicketkeeper Rudi Second and spin-bowling all-rounder Senuran Muthusamy were handed Test caps. “All three newcomers to the Test side have more than earned their spurs through impressive performances in last season’s Four-Day Franchise competition,” van Zyl said. “As far as the T20 squad is concerned, Temba Bavuma and Bjorn Fortuin were two of the standout players in the CSA T20 Challenge last season while Nortje was outstanding in the Mzansi Super League until ruled out by injury.” CSA also said Aiden Markram, Theunis de Bruyn and Lungi Ngidi were not considered for the T20s as they will be preparing for the Test series by playing in South Africa A’s four-day matches against India A.last_img read more

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MUSICAL THEATRE TEACHER BEING REMEMBERED IN TORONTO FOR NURTURING TALENTS OF MANY

first_img Facebook Paul Aikins, longtime musical theatre teacher at Etobicoke School of the Arts, died on the weekend. Family, friends and students are paying tribute to him on social media. (Facebook) A beloved musical theatre teacher who died suddenly on the weekend is being remembered for nurturing the talents of many young people at an arts high school in Toronto.Paul Aikins, 54, a teacher and director in the musical theatre department at the Etobicoke School of the Arts (ESA), died on Saturday.In a message on the school website, ESA principal Grant Fawthrop said the school is “grief-stricken” by the news of Aikins’ death. ESA is a specialized public arts-academic high school. Advertisement Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment center_img “Paul’s impact at ESA, our music theatre program, and its many students was enormous. This loss to our community hurts deeply and it will for sometime,” Fawthrop writes.Aikins worked at ESA for the past 20 years and was a department head for 10 years. He was artistic director of the school’s show choir Splash, named national grand champions five times.‘He did what he taught and he taught what he did’Heather Bambrick, a jazz vocalist, performer and educator, described Aikins as a “powerhouse” in an interview on CBC Radio’s Metro Morning. Aikins, her friend and colleague, was “driven” and “fun-loving,” she said. Login/Register With: Advertisement Twitterlast_img read more

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OSU football game day costs add up to 94 million for athletic

Ohio State students paid $32 per ticket for home football games last season. The OSU Athletic Department spent more than $1.3 million a game to host them. The department spent nearly $9.4 million on the 2009 season. That figure would have covered the cost of tuition for nearly 1,000 in-state students. The department made almost $31.4 million on games last year, good for nearly $4.5 million a game. Department officials said they expect similar numbers for expenses and revenue for the 2010 season. Profits from each game remain relatively constant throughout the season, but the expenses vary drastically, even though the price tag per game covers similar services. The difference between the most expensive game for the athletic department, Navy, and the least expensive, University of Southern California, was $945,784. Because of agreements with contractors, the cost of electricity, cleanup services and payments to game officials is fixed. The disparity in overall cost comes largely from game guarantees. These guarantees — the amount the athletic department pays visiting schools — are usually negotiated by the athletic director. “If it was a home-and-home situation like USC was, the guarantees are usually significantly less,” said Pete Hagan, associate athletic director of finance. OSU played at USC in 2008 before the Trojans came to Ohio Stadium last season, meaning the schools essentially traded game guarantees. “The Navy one was higher because there was some glitch in the schedule that … required us to go out and give them a much higher guarantee to get them in here,” he said. Hagan said those types of scheduling problems are rare but would not disclose precisely what the “glitch” was. In the Big Ten, the more profitable teams — such as OSU — are required to distribute $1 million to opponents for home conference games, Hagan said. Removing game guarantees from the equation, the USC game cost the university $88,968 more than any other contest, looking at only operating expenses. That variation stems primarily from kickoff times. “The only thing that really affects the expense side is if it’s a noon game, a 3:30 (p.m.) start or a night game,” Hagan said. “A lot of the security and traffic control … has to start for a night game early in the morning just like a regular game would.” The USC game kicked off at 8 p.m. Those traffic control and security costs constitute the two largest portions of the operational expenses for a given game. OSU spent just more than $1.4 million on security and traffic and parking for the 2009 season. By comparison, the University of Nebraska spent nearly $849,000 on those areas last season, and the University of Iowa expects to spend $975,000 on security and traffic in 2010. Don Patko, OSU’s associate athletic director of facilities management, said the university ultimately benefits from the money spent. “Between in-bound and out-bound (traffic), we are second to none … in and out. For 102,000 fans in an urban setting, we’re one of the best,” he said, sitting in his office inside the stadium. The stadium holds 102,329 people. With that many people clustered in one area, security becomes another major factor, officials said. “We know that Ohio Stadium is a desirable target for the bad guys so we do everything that we can … to protect our fans,” said Ben Jay, associate athletic director of finance and operations. Officials said that, to protect visitors and athletes, the university works with about a dozen law enforcement agencies to secure the stadium and surrounding areas. Though officials would not say exactly which agencies are involved, it includes Columbus Police, OSU Police, the State Highway Patrol, the Franklin County Sheriff’s Office, the Columbus Fire Department and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. For each agency, OSU is “at the mercy” of its union when it comes to cost, Hagan said. “Ohio State is looked at as the leader in this type of security business,” Patko said. “We’ve got to be the best secured stadium in the country.” Megan Schneider, a third-year in nursing, has attended football games at the University of Illinois in addition to OSU and noticed a difference in the level of security. In Illinois, “I still felt secure, but it wasn’t quite as intense as Ohio State,” she said. Molly Shlaes, a third-year in civil engineering, has attended games at Ohio Stadium and the University of Iowa. “Around the stadium, I would say there’s a lot more (security) here,” she said, “because the streets surrounding are bigger than the streets surrounding at Iowa, so they have to direct more traffic.” OSU officials said the security effort for home football games is such a smooth operation that other universities use OSU’s model as the standard. “About a year ago, the Department of Homeland Security partnered with the university creating a video that’s used as a training module for other venues on how to set up security at their stadiums,” said Tom McGinnis, assistant athletic director of administration and human resources. The video was federally funded through the Urban Area Security Initiative, said OSU Police Chief Paul Denton, in an e-mail. The stadium’s clean-up operation is another area that officials think sets OSU apart. “We probably have the lowest cleanup cost in the country,” Patko said. “A lot of stadiums go $15 (thousand) to $20 (thousand) in just power washing and trash removal, where that has been stabilized at about $7,100.” Total cleanup expenses at other universities are often around $50,000 a game, he said. The University of Georgia, whose stadium seats 10,000 fewer fans than Ohio Stadium, spent about $40,000 per game on cleanup costs last year. Lower clean-up costs are largely tied to a 43-year relationship with the university ROTC, which works alongside student employees Sunday mornings to clean the stadium. The cooperation leads not only to lower costs, but also rapid turnaround. “By 10:30 or 11 a.m. Sunday morning, we are ready for a meeting, another game, an event or anything inside” the stadium, Patko said. Though the post-game cleaning saves the department money, cleaning during games, especially in restrooms, is costly. “We have specific crews that have to hit those areas at strategic times during a game,” Patko said. The effort of the athletic department to increase recycling efforts has also resulted in higher expenses. “We are trying to get to zero waste, and that’s hard to do,” Patko said. “There’s some extra cost going to recycled products.” Although the choice to recycle has increased expenses, officials said the athletic department is looking to cut costs in other areas. “Cutting expenses, there are always ways to look at that,” Patko said. “If you cut expenses you’ve got to defer something.” Officials are wary, though, to cut corners by hiring fewer staff members. “You could save it on not having so much personnel here,” Patko said. “But personnel things can create a risk.” Although officials gave their program ample praise, they wouldn’t compare their facilities to the most prestigious football venues. “We’re not at the pro level. The pro level is the Cadillac,” Patko said. But “we’re probably giving the folks a little more service than some of the better schools.” Ultimately, some said, comparing Ohio Stadium to others around the country is difficult. “It’s very hard to compare us even to some of the major big-school programs around the country,” Jay said. “We’re a different animal than everybody else.” The differences arise because of the stadium’s size and location, he said. The urban surrounding in Columbus is rare for college stadiums. The other universities whose stadiums make up the five largest in the country, University of Michigan, Penn State University, University of Tennessee and the University of Alabama, are all in lower-populated areas. Columbus also has more than four times as many people as the cities where those schools are located. Officials toyed with Penn State and the University of Texas for size comparison but had difficulties coming up with college venues that matched Ohio Stadium in both capacity and surrounding population. “As far as (college) stadiums of our size around the country, we’re second to none,” Patko said. “Of the stadiums over 100,000 in North America, it would be Dallas Cowboys in pro and then Ohio State.” read more

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