Dr James Borchers named Director of Medical Services

Dr. James Borchers is the head team physician for OSU athletics and Director of Medical Services for The Ohio State Univeristy Wexner Medical Center. Credit: Courtesy of OSU Department of AthleticsLast week, Dr. James Borchers was named head team physician for the Ohio State Department of Athletics. In the new position, Borchers will be responsible for overseeing day-to-day operations of other team physicians and ensuring that every varsity student-athlete receives the best possible care.Borchers said he is excited to take on the challenges of the new position. He started in his new role on Sept. 22.“It’s very humbling,” Borchers said. “It’s a position that I think I’ve prepared for and am really looking forward to doing. It means a lot for me in my career development, and it means a lot for me doing it here at Ohio State.”Dr. Christopher Kaeding, executive director of sports medicine at OSU, decided that with the recent expansions of the sports medicine program, it would benefit from someone heading the team physicians.“With the expansion of our program and the increase in demands, regulation and bureaucracy and the caring for a Division I collegiate athletic program, we need to expand our personnel and resources to meet those needs,” Kaeding said.And for Kaeding, Borchers was a shoe-in for the job. “I think he has a passion for the job,” Kaeding said. “He has 12 years of experience, and he understands and is very good at implementing the team concept of caring for the student athletes.”Borchers has been working at Ohio State for 12 years, but his time as a Buckeye started long before his time in the sports medicine program. After leaving his hometown of Bellbrook, Ohio, Borchers played center and long snapper for the OSU football team from 1989 to 1993. But, as a player, Borchers was still a bit unsure about what the future had in store for him.“At that time when I played, I had an interest in medicine, but I also had some other interests and I didn’t really, at that point, have it figured out that that’s what I wanted to do,” Borchers said. “But certainly we had great team physicians back then, and I really appreciated the care I got. And I think as I went on and went to medical school and got involved in medicine, I really appreciated it more.”After graduating from OSU, Borchers went on to the Northeastern Ohio College of Medicine, where he received his M.D. He completed his residency and fellowship at the University of Toledo Athletic Department from 2000 to 2004. Since then, Borchers has been providing care to varsity athletes at his alma mater in the role of team physician.While working as a physician, Borchers completed his master’s of public health at Ohio State in 2008, a degree that has done a lot to benefit him in his line of work.“It’s been helpful as a sports medicine physician because although we are concerned about individual athletes, often times we are making decisions, too, that affect teams and groups of people and looking for ways to help treat certain injury types or prevent certain injury types so it really has been helpful for me with my career,” Borchers said.Over the last two years, Borchers has had a more advanced role in the sports medicine field, serving the program at OSU as lead physician, associate professor, and division director of sports medicine.To Kaeding, Borchers’ promotion serves more as a new title than new tasks to complete.“It’s actually a very small jump from being the director of clinical operations to being the head team physician,” Kaeding said. “He’s essentially been doing the majority of the job as head team physician already; we’re just recognizing him with the formal title.”But the new title does come with some additional responsibilities. In addition to overseeing other team physicians, Borchers will serve as the executor of the policies decided on by the Ohio State Sports Medicine Administrative Group. According to Kaeding, the group has to “formulate the policies and procedures for the care of the athletes.”The group is an “intersection where the medical center and athletic department meet” and it consists of Janine Oman, senior associate athletics director for student services and sport administration, and Doug Calland, associate athletic director for sport performance, along with Kaeding and Borchers. Looking ahead, Borchers has a few goals in mind.“Primarily, first and foremost, (our goal) is to make certain that we’re leaders in advancing health and safety for our student athletes,” Borchers said. “We want to make certain that we are staying on the forefront of everything we can do to promote health and safety for our student athletes and be advocates for them.”Borchers said being at the top of sports health care and providing a friendly and helpful atmosphere is key to the success.“Secondarily, we want to make certain that we’re providing an environment where we are doing all that we can to help these student athletes be accessible to the things they love to do,” Borchers continued. “And so we have to help work within our multidisciplinary team to make that happen and if I can provide some leadership in that area, I will be happy to accomplish it.” read more

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Mens soccer defeats conference champion Hoosiers earns No 2 seed in Big

In a game that meant less to the standings and more to its pride on senior day, the Ohio State men’s soccer team (10-5-2, 4-2-0) took down the Big Ten champion Indiana Hoosiers (9-6-2, 4-1-1) 1-0 Sunday at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium. “It’s a very emotional day,” senior Sam Scales said after taking the pitch at home for the last time. “For Konrad (Warzycha), Matt (Gold) and I, it’s a dream come true. It really is bitter-sweet, to be honest.” Warzycha, Gold and Scales have been one of the most successful classes in history, amassing 48 wins during their tenure — good for third most of any four-year class at OSU. Austin McAnena scored the game’s lone goal when an Indiana defender misdirected his shot from seven yards out. If the shot went untouched, it likely would have gone right to goalkeeper Luis Soffner. “To be honest, we haven’t had a lot of breaks this year,” coach John Bluem said. “So to catch a deflection like that and see the way it spun into the net playing against the wind was great.” OSU fended off a strong second-half effort from the conference champions that was highlighted by Matt Lampson’s goalkeeping and timely defense. “They have one of the top goal scorers in the conference, and we held them,” McAnena said. “Props to our center backs and Lampson for some great saves.” Indiana’s Will Bruin has scored 15 goals this season and was mentioned by Bluem as one of the better “brute force” players in the country. Sunday’s loss to the Buckeyes was the first conference game the Hoosiers have lost this season. The Hoosiers came into Sunday’s match leading the all-time series 45-5-2 against the Buckeyes. With the win, OSU has won three straight over IU dating back to last year, when the Buckeyes took both games the teams played. “Their tradition in this conference is not matched by any of us. We’ve been battling for a long time now to try to be on an even par with them and gain some notoriety for ourselves,” Bluem said. This season marks the first time since 1974 that OSU has gone unbeaten at home with a 7-0-1 record at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium. OSU earned the No. 2 seed in the Big Ten Tournament and will play No. 7 Wisconsin on Thursday. read more

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Deadly stabbing in Old Town leaves one dead

first_img July 21, 2018 KUSI Newsroom 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – Detectives are investigating the circumstances surrounding a man who died Saturday on a sidewalk in the Old Town community of San Diego.Police received a call at 1 a.m. of an injured person in the 4500 block of Pacific Coast Highway, said San Diego police Lt. Anthony Dupree.Officers arriving at the scene found a man lying on the sidewalk suffering from lacerations and trauma to his upper torso, Dupree said. Arriving paramedics treated the man, who eventually was pronounced dead at the scene.The San Diego Police Department’s Homicide Unit asked anyone with information regarding this incident to call them at (619) 531-2293. KUSI Newsroom, Deadly stabbing in Old Town leaves one deadcenter_img Updated: 9:57 AM Posted: July 21, 2018 Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

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Bats may use magnetic polarity for navigation

first_img Lunar and solar eclipses make animals do strange things The finding may not only explain bats’ long-distance navigation and foraging abilities, but also may provide insight on when and how magnetic field detection evolved in mammals and non-mammals. So explain the researchers, Yinan Wang, Yongxin Pan, Stuart Parsons, Michael Walker, and Shuyi Zhang, who are from the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing, East China Normal University in Shanghai, and the University of Auckland in New Zealand.“The fact that the only two flying vertebrates, bats and birds, do not derive the same information about direction from the Earth’s magnetic field despite apparently similar navigational requirements has very important implications for the evolution of the magnetic sense in vertebrates,” Parsons told PhysOrg.com. “I think it is likely that other mammals possess the ability to detect the field, i.e. have the physiological and anatomical specialization necessary. However, this does not mean that they actually use this information.”In their experiment, the scientists studied the reactions of Nyctalus plancyi bats in an experimental chamber when exposed to an altered magnetic field. The team recorded the hanging positions of the bats with an infrared camera, and then used Helmholtz coils to generate a magnetic field that aligned with the local geomagnetic axis at Beijing, where the experiment took place, with twice the intensity of Earth’s magnetic field. After exposing the bats to the induced magnetic field for several days, the researchers then altered the horizontal and vertical components of the field, both simultaneously and independently. As the group explained, altering the vertical field affects the magnetic inclination, while altering the horizontal field affects the magnetic polarity. Many birds and other non-mammals are known to react to inclination, meaning that they can use information about the different angles that the Earth’s magnetic field is tilted toward the Earth to determine relative latitude. For example, inclination is 90 degrees at the poles (perpendicular to the Earth) and 0 degrees at the equator (parallel to the Earth)—similar to the pattern that lead filings make when placed around a bar magnet. Some birds, like the Arctic Tern, use inclination to annually navigate all the way from the North Pole to the South Pole and back. However, unlike birds, the bats did not react to a change in the vertical field, implying that they do not use inclination when roosting or navigating. On the other hand, when the researchers altered the horizontal field, the bats changed their hanging positions, switching from the northern to the southern end of their basket. The scientists predict that magnetic polarity may help the bats in thermoregulation, since they choose warmer sites to control lactation and development, as well as to minimize the energy used during torpor (hibernation). If they used magnetic polarity in roosting, the scientists suggest, the bats are also likely use polarity to navigate, such as when Nyctalus noctula migrate up to 1600 km between seasons.How do they do it? The scientists explain that animals which use magnetism to navigate are generally thought to use light exposure, magnetite receptors, or both. For example, birds may use a light-dependent mechanism in the right eye for directional information, and a magnetite receptor in the upper beak for detecting variations in magnetic intensity. Most likely, bats use some kind of magnetite receptor. Why the two animals developed sensitivities to different magnetic information is still a question, however. Parsons speculated that an inclination compass may offer more tolerance for birds crossing the equator. Also, when the Earth’s magnetic field occasionally reverses, the birds will not be confused.“It has been suggested that the ability of birds to detect the inclination of the Earth’s magnetic field means that reversal of the polarity of the Earth’s magnetic field will not affect the ability of birds, particularly migratory birds, to set compass courses because there will be a magnetic pole in each hemisphere and the birds will know the direction toward the near pole and the equator as a consequence,” added Walker. “In contrast, the fact that mammals appear to respond to magnetic polarity suggests they will know where magnetic north is but not which hemisphere they are in and may get misled following a reversal of the polarity of the Earth’s magnetic field.”Another significant point from the experiments is that polarity alone is sufficient to navigate long distances. The research also suggests that inclination and polarity detection may have evolved independently in birds and mammals, which means the ability would have emerged after the evolutionary transition from land to air—and would also explain why humans are quite poor at navigating in the absence of a map and a GPS.Citation: Wang, Yinan, Pan, Yongxin, Parsons, Stuart, Walker, Michael, and Zhang, Shuyi. “Bats respond to polarity of a magnetic field.” Proceedings of the Royal Society B. doi:10.1098/rspb.2007.0904. Copyright 2007 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. Researchers have found that bats have a special ability to detect the polarity of a magnetic field, meaning that the creatures can tell the difference between north and south. The only other animal known to have this ability is the mole rat, while birds, fish, amphibians, and all other non-mammals possess a different version of the magnetic compass. Citation: Bats may use magnetic polarity for navigation (2007, September 20) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2007-09-magnetic-polarity.htmlcenter_img Experimental setup showing the bats’ roosting chamber, with the bats gathered at one end of the basket in response to the polarity of the induced magnetic field. Credit: Yinan Wang, et al. Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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first_img Sponsor Advertisement The dollar index closed late on Monday afternoon at 85.02—and after dipping to its Tuesday low of 84.75 about 35 minutes before the London open, the index began to rally—and closed right on its 85.40 high, up 38 basis points on the day. Here are two of the four photos that I kept from my hour or so of sitting around the old pond late Sunday morning.  At this time of year—and at this latitude in North America—all that’s left in the way of birds is the migratory waterfowl, plus a few magpies—and they won’t head south until the arrival of the first snow of the season finally forces them to leave. This first photo is a group of Canada geese neatly surrounding an immature common goldeneye duck.  This shot is from about 50 meters or so. Both platinum and palladium also followed a very similar price path as gold and silver right up until the Comex open.  Rallies in both began shortly after that—and both ran out of gas/got capped at the London p.m. gold fix.  The platinum price drifted lower into the close—and the palladium price traded almost ruler flat from 10 a.m. EDT onwards.  Platinum closed up $10—and palladium closed up $14.  Here are the charts. I didn’t take this seagull photo below, but I can tell you that it was taken with an ultra-wide angle lens—14mm or wider—as everything from 10 centimeters to 10 kilometers away is in razor-sharp focus.  And because of that, the photo looks almost surreal. The CME Daily Delivery Report showed that 154 gold and 100 silver contracts were posted for delivery within the Comex-approved depositories on Thursday.  Once again it was the “Barclays Show” in gold, as their proprietary trading account issued 154 contracts—and 152 of those contracts were stopped in its client account.  In the last three business days, 604 gold contracts have been transferred from one Barclays pocket to another. In silver, the only short/issuer was ABN Amro with 100 contracts—and the three long/stoppers were Jefferies, Scotiabank and R.J. O’Brien.  There have already been 754 silver contracts posted for delivery in October, which is quite a few considering that October is not a traditional delivery month.  The link to yesterday’s Issuers and Stoppers Report is here. The CME Preliminary Report for the Tuesday trading session showed that gold open interest in October dropped by 219 contracts—and those were the Barclays deliveries scheduled for today.  Open interest in the current month is now down to 388 contracts—minus the 154 Barclays contracts mentioned in the previous paragraph.  Silver open interest in October now stands at 102 contracts, down 3 contracts from Monday’s report. There were no reported changes in GLD yesterday—and as of 9:42 p.m. EDT yesterday evening, there were no reported changes in SLV. The good folks over at Switzerland’s Zürcher Kantonalbank updated their website with the changes in their gold and silver ETFs for the week ending, Friday, October 17—and this is what they had to report:  Their gold ETF declined by another 12,660 troy ounces, but their silver ETF went in the other direction for the second week in a row, adding 71,103 troy ounces. It was a big sales day over at the U.S. Mint.  They sold 8,000 troy ounces of gold eagles—2,000 one-ounce 24K gold buffaloes—and 715,000 silver eagles.  Knowing what’s going on in the physical retail market in real time, I can tell you without a word of lie that a huge chunk of these sales are not to the average retail investor.  This is most likely Ted Butler’s ‘Mr. Big’ in action. Over at the Comex-approved depositories on Monday, they didn’t receive any gold, but 24,278 troy ounces were shipped out, with virtually every bar coming out of Scotiabank’s warehouse.  The link to that activity is here. In silver, there were 607,638 troy ounces received—and 425,900 troy ounces shipped out the door.  The link to that action is here. I have a more reasonable number of stories for you in today’s Critical Reads section—and I hope you’ll find the odd one that interests you. There were additional withdrawals from the big silver ETF, SLV, this [past] week and again the withdrawals seem counterintuitive when held up against [the] price action (mostly flat) and trading volume (mostly subdued). From the recent top of 350 million oz, some 6.5 million oz of silver have been delisted from the SLV, as shares outstanding has dropped accordingly. I can’t prove it, but my strong sense is that a big buyer might be converting shares of SLV to direct physical metal ownership so as to avoid reporting more than a 5% stake to the SEC. My strong sense results from me wanting to do exactly the same thing were I so fortunate to be able to do so financially. Try to imagine having the money to buy as much silver as you could. Next, imagine how you would actually go about it and didn’t want to openly disclose the purchase while it was being made. If you can imagine a better way than by what I am speculating might be occurring in SLV presently, please drop me a line. I confess to maybe hearing and seeing things that might not exist, particularly when so many unusual things appear to be present in silver, but the sales reporting pattern for Silver Eagles from the U.S. Mint still suggests a big buyer is present.  Sales for the month are impressive, but more notable is the uneven pattern of daily sales; some days 50,000 coins are reported sold, or none at all—and on other days, more than 500,000. If broad public retail demand was behind the recent surge in Silver Eagles, that would manifest itself with steady day-to-day reported sales. Since that is not the pattern at all, the most plausible explanation would be a single big buyer picking the time and price for purchase. Regardless, it should still be close to a record year for sales of Silver Eagles. – Silver analyst Ted Butler: 18 October 2014 With the obvious price capping in both gold and silver at the Comex open yesterday morning and, to a certain extent, platinum and palladium as well—it leaves little doubt in my mind that JPMorgan et al. aren’t going to let prices run too far to the upside, regardless of the supply/demand fundamentals. Of course the Managed Money shorts in both gold—and particularly silver—still have boat loads of positions to cover, but based on the price action since the lows of last week, especially in gold, any rally that is allowed, will be well contained. There’s always the possibility that something could go sideways that changes all that, but at the moment, that’s the way I see it.  The share price action is equally as lousy—and as I’ve stated several times since the lows in both metals, it appears that they are being actively managed as well. The message from the powers-that-be is clear, as it appears they don’t want investors anywhere near the precious metal complex, at least for the time being. Here are the six-month charts for the “Big 6” commodities— Uranium Energy Corp. (NYSE MKT: UEC) is pleased to announce that the final authorization has been granted for production at its Goliad ISR Project in South Texas.  As announced in previous press releases, the Company received all of the required authorizations from the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, including an Aquifer Exemption which has now been granted concurrence from EPA Region 6. “We are very pleased to have received this final authorization for initiating production at Goliad. Our geological and engineering teams have worked diligently toward achieving this major milestone and are to be truly commended. We are grateful to the EPA for its thorough reviews and for issuing this final concurrence. The Company’s near-term plan is to complete construction at the first production area at Goliad and to greatly increase the throughput of uranium at our centralized Hobson processing plant.” Please contact Investor Relations with questions or to request additional information, [email protected] And as I type this paragraph, the London open is about 20 minutes away.  Both gold and silver are down small amounts—and platinum and palladium are both trading unchanged at the moment.  Gold volume is just under 12,000 contracts—and silver’s volume is just under 2,700 contracts.  The dollar index is down 13 basis points.  Nothing much to see here. Just looking at the six-month gold chart above, you can see some of the Managed Money headed for the exits the moment the price broke above gold’s 50-day moving average—and how the seller of last resort and their algorithms were there to drive the price back down to its 50-day moving average once again, just to stop more shorts from getting the same idea.  I’ll be extremely interested in how the price is allowed to react once that moving average is broken with some authority—and I’m also concerned, as I mentioned yesterday, that ‘da boyz’ could engineer a rally “failure” at this juncture as well. So we wait some more. And as I send this off to Stowe, Vermont at 4:45 a.m. EDT, I note that all four precious metals are trading lower since London opened, with silver down the most of all, of course—and these smallish selloffs are probably coming on the back of the reversal in the dollar index.  It was down 13 basis points two hours ago—and is now up 10 basis points.  Gold volume is up to a bit over 21,000 contracts—and silver’s volume is now at 5,700 contracts—neither of which is very heavy for this time of day. I’m off to bed—and I’ll see you here tomorrow. JPMorgan et al. aren’t going to let prices run too far to the upside The gold price didn’t do much in early Far East trading, but began to chop higher starting shortly after 11 a.m. Hong Kong time.  It peaked out at the 10:30 a.m. BST London a.m. gold fix—and then got sold down to it’s closing price on Monday.  The short covering rally that began minutes after the Comex open ran into the usual not-for-profit sellers about 15 minutes later—and then gold chopped lower until shortly before 4 p.m. in electronic trading.  From that point it rallied a few dollars into the close. The low and high ticks, such as they were, were reported by the CME Group as $1,245.70 and $1,255.60 in the December contract. Gold finished the Monday trading session in New York at $1,249.40 spot, up $2.50 on the day—and obviously well off its high, as is usually the case.  Net volume was 128,000 contracts with about a third of that coming before 9 a.m. BST in London trading. The folks over at finance.yahoo.com decided to provide access to only their interactive HUI chart starting yesterday—and have blocked access to their basic chart, which is what I’ve always used.  Unfortunately, you can’t copy an interactive chart—and the new chart I was thinking of using doesn’t have the line on it for the previous day’s closing prices, so I’m stuck with this little one for now.  If you have a favourite HUI chart that you like to use, please send me the link, as I need something other than the dinky chart below. Having got that out of the way, the gold stocks gapped up about 2% at the open—and then chopped sideways until shortly after 12:30 p.m. EDT.  Then, mysteriously, the shares got sold down into negative territory once again, although they did rally a bit during the last 30 minutes of trading.  The HUI closed down 0.28%. The silver equities started the day off well into the black, but they too ran into a seller at the same time as the gold shares, but managed to hang on to some of their gains, as Nick Laird’s Intraday Silver Sentiment Index closed up 0.86%. The second shot is from less than 20 meters—and it’s a study in depth of field, as even though I had the f-stop cranked up to the DLA of the camera, at this distance and using a 400mm telephoto lens, sharp depth of field is only about a meter at most, as the geese in the foreground and background are progressively more out of focus.  The red colour in the water is the reflection of a building in the distant background.  I have too many photos of Canada geese already—and I only took this one because they were all nicely lined up. The silver price action was almost a carbon copy of the gold chart, so I’ll spare you the details; and as usual, silver got sold down the moment trading began in New York on Monday evening. The low and highs were reported as $17.355 and $17.655 in the December contract. Silver closed yesterday in New York at $17.515 spot, up 9 cents from Monday.  Net volume was decent at 32,500 contracts.last_img read more

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