White Paper to get refugees into UK jobs market

first_imgMeasuresannounced last week to create a co-ordinated approach to the employment ofrefugees and asylum-seekers could fulfil one of the key aims in PersonnelToday’s Refugees in Employment campaign. Theplans, outlined by Home Secretary David Blunkett in a White Paper, SecureBorders, Safe Haven, should make it easier for employers to recruit refugees tooffset skills shortages. “Anational approach to integration is a new concept for the UK and we are at thebeginning of the process,” the report says. “But the Government iscommitted to integration as a vital part of the whole asylum process.” Proposalsinclude a number of new induction centres for asylum-seekers in London and theSouth East, which will allow a more managed approach to processingapplications. Asylum-seekerswill also be given registration cards that will include fingerprints anddetails of employment status. Accommodationcentres are also being built, which will house 3,000 people and run activitiessuch as English language and IT training. –Personnel Today’s Refugees in Employment campaign has been shortlisted for thisyear’s CRE’s Race in the Media awards in the Specialist Magazine category. White Paper to get refugees into UK jobs marketOn 12 Feb 2002 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos. Comments are closed. last_img read more

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Logistics market is hot, but is a bubble forming?

first_imgTagsBlackstone Groupbrookfield asset managementCommercial Real Estate Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink Clockwise from left: Blackstone Group’s Jonathan Gray, KKR’s Henry Kravis and Cerberus Capital Management’s Stephen Feinberg (Photos via Getty; iStock; Cerberus)Investors can’t get enough of warehouses and logistics spaces these days, but there are some signs that a bubble could be forming.Asset management firms including Blackstone Group, Cerberus Capital Management and KKR have doubled down on logistics centers, and prices for warehouses have surged, Bloomberg News reported. According to real estate research firm Real Capital Analytics, values for industrial properties rose 8.5 percent in the past year, while retail real estate values fell 5.2 percent and offices stayed steady.The intense interest in the niche sector has led some, including Jonathan Needell, CIO of Kairos Investment Management, to wonder whether logistics space is headed for a bubble.“You’re getting people chasing industrial, in particular, to prices that are unsustainable,” said Needell. His firm controls $1 billion in commercial real estate.Investment in warehouses has ticked up outside of the United States, too. According to research firm CBRE, investments in the sector made up 20 percent of global commercial real estate spending this year, compared with just 15 percent of the total in 2015.CBRE also projects that logistics’ upward trajectory will continue for at least a decade. According to its analysis, logistics prices will rise 68 percent by 2030.Still, some lenders are wary — especially as demand for new construction of logistics space surges to 1 billion square feet by 2025, according to JLL.“There’s a huge amount of industrial space being built now,” Andrea Balkan, managing partner in Brookfield Asset Management’s real estate finance group, told Bloomberg. “We are always cautious on lending in markets or on property types which everyone else is rushing into.”[Bloomberg News] — Georgia Kromreicenter_img Share via Shortlinklast_img read more

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THE TRUMP TRANSITION TIZZY

first_imgMaking Sense by Michael ReaganThe liberal media has been in a frenzy all week.It thinks Donald Trump and his transition team are taking too long to announce his cabinet picks and other appointees.Let me check my calendar.Yep. It’s been less than ten days since Trump shocked the world — and sickened the liberal media — by humiliating Hillary Clinton.And already the media are working as hard as they can to make Trump look like he doesn’t know what he’s doing —- before he doesn’t even do anything.I understand the liberal media’s pain. I understand they feel like their lives have been ruined for at least the next four years.I remember having similar thoughts in 2012, 2008, 1996, 1992 and 1976.But come on, MSNBC, CNN, ABC, etc., etc. Bill Clinton took his time picking his people. So did Bush II. So did my father. It’s part of the process.So let’s back off a little and give Trump a little slack. He’s got to drain a pretty big cesspool in Washington. He has 4,000 positions to fill.It’s been obvious for a long time he was not just going to make some phone calls and hire 3,993 Bush II administration alumni who’ve been making their livings as lobbyists for the last eight years.The tizzy over Trump’s supposedly slow transition process is just another step in the liberal media’s agenda —- which is “Dump on Trump.”First they were cutting their wrists over his election win. Now it’s his appointments. Wait till they see his Supreme Court picks.For the next four years, when it comes to President Trump, the liberal media are going to accentuate the negative, not the positive.As much as I wasn’t a supporter of Donald Trump in the primaries, I said after the convention that I wasn’t going to allow him to lose because I didn’t show up to vote for him.The fact is, I showed up and so did almost 70 million Americans.My hat’s off to Trump.He’s the president-elect. We Reagans support him. We had our time in the sun and now it’s time for Trump supporters to have theirs.Godspeed, President Donald. Whatever I can do to help, I’m there. No cabinet post would disappoint me.I hope he puts the right people around him. He’s done pretty well choosing people in the business world.And let’s face it. We conservatives and others have been saying for a long time we needed a businessman in White House.Last I looked, we were still $20 trillion in debt. Maybe President Trump can do something about that.I’ll bet he’ll surprise us. Everyday I get more and more respect for him. He stands his ground.Whether you agree with his positions or not, he stands his ground.The great thing about my dad was that he knew what he believed and knew why he believed it.I’m starting to feel that Trump knows what he believes, too, and he knows why he believes it, come hell or high water.Meanwhile, I have a tip for our impatient media.I’m not a journalist. But if I were, instead of doing dumb stories about why President-elect Trump is taking so long to make his picks, I’d start checking out the list of potential Supreme Court nominees he gave us.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Dick Grimes — One of Ocean City’s ‘Finest Citizens’ — Dies at 96

first_imgRichard “Dick” Grimes. Photo Credit: Donald B. KravitzRichard “Dick” Grimes, a man whose influence touched people and institutions throughout Ocean City, died Saturday at age 96.Grimes was the first black employee of the U.S. Post Office in Ocean City. He helped found the Ocean City Youth Athletic Association in 1956. As a member of the Ocean City Ecumenical Council, he helped create the local Food Cupboard and Clothes Closet. He was active with the Boys Scouts and the Housing Authority. He was named the Ocean City Regional Chamber of Commerce Citizen of the Year in 2007.A World War II veteran,  Grimes came home to Ocean City and mentored countless Ocean City youth with his knowledge and boundless enthusiasm.“He was basically one of the finest Ocean City citizens that we’ve known,” said Bill Hughes Sr., a former U.S. Representative and ambassador who lives in Ocean City. “He was always up on current events, and he loved Ocean City.”“When he walked down the Avenue, it would take him a half hour to get to the bank,” Hughes said, recalling an image of Grimes shaking hands and speaking with all the people he knew.“We’re going to miss him,” Hughes said. “I’ve never heard him say anything negative about anybody. He loved children and devoted his life to helping others.”Grimes was active in the Democratic Club in town, and he helped with Congressional campaigns during Hughes tenure from 1974 to 1994.Born in Pittsburgh in 1919, Grimes came to Ocean City to live with his grandmother, Emma Davis, when he was 7 years old. He was schooled in Ocean City but moved briefly to Philadelphia and graduated from Central High School.Grimes served five years with the 13th Combat Cargo Squadron of the U.S. Army Air Forces, which was involved in aerial transport from India to Burma and later from Burma to China during World War II.He returned to Ocean City and began a lifelong career with the Post Office.He married a Marzita Miles Grimes, a graduate of the University of Maryland Eastern Shore who was the first black teacher at Ocean City High School (home economics). Marzita died in March at age 97.Grimes is survived by two daughters, Clarissa Price of Baltimore and Rita Brown of Galloway Township.Grimes helped organize the Ocean City Youth Athletic Association in 1956 for baseball, and he was active in creating youth basketball and football programs as well. He was later known for his interest in playing and teaching tennis.The baseball field at Sixth Street and Haven Avenue was named for him in 2008.“He was a great influence on the kids,” said Greg Donahue, a former OCYAA president and Ocean City educator. “He was just a wonderful person.”Donahue recalled Grimes walking across the street from his home on Sixth Street to watch youth baseball games before they moved to the field at 35th Street.“He would cheer the kids on and talk to them,” Donahue said. “He saw potential in children.”Tom Williams, a veteran sportswriter and broadcaster who grew up in Ocean City and has followed local sports for 50 years, remembers Grimes as his first Babe Ruth baseball coach on a team that won a league championship.“He was always a guy filled with energy,” Williams said. “And he had a way of lifting your energy when he showed you something on the baseball field and acted it out.”“He came through times when there were racial barriers in Ocean City,” Williams said.But Grimes never showed any signs of bitterness or anything but genuine interest in the community.“He was a guy you’d see all over the place,” Williams said of Grimes, even in his later years. “And he always made you think, ‘How can I feel tired?’ ”Dottie Cianci, coordinator of the Ocean City Ecumenical Council Community Food Cupboard, worked with Grimes since about 2000.“It’s a great loss,” Cianci said. ” He was one of the co-founders of the Food Cupboard, and he was my mentor.”Cianci said Grimes was instrumental in organizing the Postal Service Food Drives that help the Food Cupboard operate.“He was always there. We couldn’t have done it without him. Both he and his wife were very active. I found it a privilege to know him. A finer person you couldn’t meet.”Further detail is still pending, but funeral services are scheduled for 11 a.m. Tuesday, August 19, at the Ocean City Tabernacle.__________Sign up for OCNJ Daily’s free newsletter and breaking news alerts“Like” us on Facebooklast_img read more

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Pamper Scamper: Ocean City at a Crawl

first_imgThe annual Pamper Scamper in Ocean City, NJ, took place on Tuesday, Aug. 12, 2014.They came. They sat. They crawled.Ocean City hosted its annual Pamper Scamper on Tuesday morning (August 12) on the beach at Sixth Street.For about four decades, the good-natured competition has challenged parents to leave their infant children in the center of a parachute spread out on the beach … and has challenged the infants to crawl back to the perimeter of the parachute and the welcoming arms of their parents.The event included about eight heats of eight infants divided into three age categories: 9 months old and younger, 9 months to 12 months, and 12 months to 15 months.In the heat of champions, 15-month-old Maeve McManus crawled to victory in a blazing 9 seconds. She attended with her mom, Laura McManus of Philadelphia and Ocean City.The Pamper Scamper is a prelude to Ocean City’s 105th annual Baby Parade, which takes place 5 p.m. Thursday (Aug. 14) on the Boardwalk between Sixth and 12th streets.last_img read more

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Carr’s reports improvement to milling figures

first_imgCarr’s has revealed a slight turnaround in the financial performance of its milling business, with “weather-related factors” having a beneficial impact.In its interim management statement for the 18 weeks to 6 July, the firm said that its milling arm was operating in an industry plagued by over-capacity and volatile input prices, but that it had begun to improve.Contrary to much of the baking industry’s experiences of last summer’s poor wheat harvest, Carr’s has been a positive one, after it led to a significantly greater dependence on imports.“The port-side location of two of our three mills (Kirkcaldy and Silloth) continues to give Carr’s cost-effective access to overseas wheat,” it said, adding that the cold and wet conditions of this year’s winter and spring, and the outlook for another low-volume harvest this summer could result in further reliance on overseas wheat.Carr’s added that the closure of Premier Foods’ Glasgow mill in Dunaskin at the end of March eased some capacity-related pressures in the Scottish market.Its own state-of-the-art mill, currently being built at Kirkcaldy, is on track for commissioning in September, with the planned significant efficiencies and improvements in operating margins coming through next year, said Carr’s.last_img read more

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What we eat and why we eat it

first_img How to feed 10 billion by midcentury The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news. Food binds us together. A shared meal can help broker peace between families, or peace between nations. But food also can be divisive. Deciding what to eat is about more than nutrition or what tastes good. What we choose to feed ourselves and our families is a product of our cultural and political identities.In the latest series from Veritalk, a podcast from the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Harvard Ph.D. students share their insights into the science and culture of food.Episode 1: Turmeric lattes and tikki masala,The connection between food and culture fascinates Nikhita Obeegadoo, who taught a course entirely about the connection between food and diaspora. In her class, students explored the ways that immigrants have brought new food traditions into American culture.“Culture is always changing, culture is always evolving,” Obeegadoo said. “And there is something unrealistic in expecting food to just stay the way it is.”Episode 2: Veritalk goes vegan,Americans’ eating habits might be on the verge of another major cultural shift. Sociology student Nina Gheihman says that like it or not, climate change will make animal agriculture unsustainable. Fast-food companies are trying to get ahead of that trend. Burger King and White Castle recently introduced beef-free burgers. And, very soon, lab-grown meat will hit the consumer market.“I think this is really exciting technology because we really do have a huge problem when it comes to the ethical and the environmental consequences of animal agriculture,” Gheihman said. “So it has huge potential in changing our food system.”Episode 3: Go with your gut,Surprisingly, there is a lot that scientists don’t yet know about how the foods we eat affect our health. We get help in digesting food from trillions of tiny bacteria in our guts. Cary Allen-Blevins studies the connection between breast milk and the infant gut microbiome, and Vayu Maini Rekdal studies the way microbes help us get nutrition from plants.“If you did not have gut microbiota in your system, then a lot of things go really haywire,” Allen-Blevins said. “There are differences in immune regulation. There are differences in behavior.”Episode 4: Your body isn’t broken,Not everyone has access to healthy foods. Education programs in schools have tried to change that. But Hannah Cory, who worked as a school dietitian in Michigan, takes issue with the idea that education alone can prevent childhood obesity.“There isn’t a lot of acknowledgment in the literature of the fact that the ‘obesity epidemic’ has been going on for almost two decades now,” said Cory. “I would have students coming in to meet with me and they could already tell me everything I was going to tell them.”To hear the latest from Harvard Ph.D. students on matters from food to monsters to plumage, subscribe to Veritalk. Plan on less meat, more plants, and … err … pass the crickets, panelists suggest The dietary factor Could a popular food ingredient raise the risk for diabetes and obesity? Relatedlast_img read more

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SMC blood drive sees large turnout

first_imgAs a way of helping meet the American Red Cross’s need for blood donations, Saint Mary’s College hosted a blood drive Monday.“Believe it or not, there is always a need for blood,” Olivia Critchlow, assistant director of the Office for Civic and Social Engagement, said. “We feel that it’s part of one’s civic duty to donate if possible.”The drive was held in the College’s Student Center Lounge from noon to 6 p.m., and was one of four blood drives the College offers each academic year.At Monday’s drive, more than 90 people had signed up to donate blood, Critchlow said. She also said students were able to continue to sign up throughout the drive, and walk-ins were also accepted.“It is important to donate blood because there is always a need for it in the community,” Critchlow said. “Blood cannot be manufactured, so the only way to fulfill the need for it is through volunteer donations.”Critchlow said the actual blood donation takes less than 10 to 12 minutes on average. Additionally, the entire blood donation process takes less than one hour.Sophomore Katie Cireski donated blood Monday to help fill a need.“There’s a need for blood and there are so many people that are eligible that don’t donate, so I figured since I am eligible to donate, I might as well,” sophomore Katie Ciresi said. “I think it’s something important to do and I think everyone should do it at least once in their life, if not more.” Junior Grace Sadowski also said she believes it is important to donate blood — so important that she has been a donor about 15 times.“I’ve always given it,” she said. “My little sister was premature and people that gave blood saved her life so I always do.”Sadowski said she thinks there is a higher need than ever before for blood donations and encouraged others to donate.“I personally can’t save people’s lives, so I feel like this is helping as much as I can,” she said. “I think more people should do it and it’s not as scary as everyone thinks. Families that do have blood donated to them are really appreciative.”According to a press release form the American Red Cross, the blood drive held Monday was parte of the “Stave a Vampire. Donate Blood” campaign.As part of the campaign, two $50 shopping sprees were given away in a drawing. Those who donated blood were entered.In addition to the blood drive held Monday, other drives for the campaign will be held in the area. On April 26 and April 27, blood drives will be held in 315 LaFortune Student Center at Notre Dame.Three $50 shopping sprees will be given away each day during the blood drives held at the University.last_img read more

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Alcoholic energy drinks discussed

first_imgAt Monday’s Campus Life Council (CLC) meeting, members discussed a memo presented by Brian Coughlin, assistant vice president for student activities and head of the recently-assembled Alcohol Energy Drink (AED) Working Group. The memo discussed the progress of the group in responding to issues related to student use of caffeinated alcoholic beverages. The memo stated that, while the FDA and other governmental agencies have already taken steps to limit or ban the popular Four Loko and Joose drinks, AEDs are still a concern because “some students may still have ‘original’ formula AEDs and/or some students may attempt to make their own should the pre-packaged products no longer be available.” The memo went on to say the group has not yet decided upon a recommendation to give Fr. Tom Doyle, vice president for student affairs. It has considered three options: banning AEDs across campus, leaving the issue to the discretion of individual rectors, and establishing no formal policy. The group did, however, indicate it would make continued efforts to increase awareness about the effects of AEDs to students, an idea that Knott Hall senator Alex Kasparie thought would be more effective than a ban. “I think the biggest thing is the education. I hate to say it, but usually I take a ban as a challenge,” he said. “No ban is going to change the attitude.” CLC member Ben Noe, a sophomore, suggested emphasizing the fact that AEDs are extremely high in calories as a way to deter students from consuming them. “We thought it would be pertinent to Notre Dame students who seem to be particularly health conscious,” he said. “Not only that these drinks are dangerous, but also that they are unhealthy for you calorie-wise.” Christopher Haug, assistant director for residence life and housing, thought raising this point with students could lead to other unhealthy behavior. “Unfortunately, one of the things we found out across the country is that people do know that, so sometimes they won’t eat dinner and will drink the Four Loko,” he said. “Then they’ll have nothing to metabolize the alcohol with.” Noe went on to say that the availability and consumption of non-alcoholic energy drinks on campus is a concern within itself. Julia Sutton, SUB director, said the University could only go so far in managing students’ decisions. “Can’t anything be harmful if overused?” she said. “I think the University can’t go that far. You can’t take energy drinks out of The Huddle unless you take Burger King out.” Student body vice president Andrew Bell highlighted the aspects of alcohol education that his culture shift task force, which is examining drinking at Notre Dame, plans to address specifically. “One of the things is the continuous education, that it’s not just overload during your first months at school,” he said. Bell said educating students about Indiana-specific alcohol laws, increasing student-led alcohol education, and informing students how to help a friend in a dangerous situation will be emphasized in the future.last_img read more

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Expert examines nations’ democratization

first_imgPoliticians often speak to democratization in the Middle East, but rarely about how the process works. On Tuesday, Dr. Ali Mazrui picked up where they left off, with his lecture “Democratizing Muslim Societies from Above and Below: Between Atatürk and Tahrir Square” in the Hesburgh Center for International Studies. Before the lecture, Scott Appleby, director of the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies introduced Mazrui as “one of the leading thinkers about Islam politics and culture in the world.” Mazrui, Director of the Institute of Global Cultural Studies at Binghamton University and Senior Fellow at the Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Center for Muslim-Christian Understanding at Georgetown University, said his talk focused on Ataturk and Tahrir Square because these revolutions represented the most striking examples of democratization from above and below, respectively, in the history of the Middle East. “The most spectacular [example] of democracy above is still the case of revolution of Atatürk in 1920s and 1930s,” Mazrui said. “The most spectacular [example] of democracy below is in Tunisia and Tahrir Square in Cairo – which ousted Hosni Mubarak in February of 2011.”  Mazrui said the revolution of Ataturk, which brought democracy to Turkey in the 1920s and 1930s, is still remembered in Turkey and other Muslim nations. He said when visiting the Middle East he has seen images of the Atatürk Revolution all over the place. Mazrui also said the Ataturk revolution in many ways “westernized” Turkey. “Turkey’s democratization from above was simultaneously Turkey’s westernization from above,” he said. This has led Muslims in other nations to wonder whether or not such westernization is an inevitable part of becoming more democratic, Mazrui said. Throughout the Muslim world people are asking themselves the same question, he said. “Can we liberally democratize without culturally westernizing?,” he said. Mazrui also said there was a strong link between education and modernity, as well as between empowering women and modernity, in Turkish society.  Mazrui then transitioned to a discussion of democratization from below. His example for this form of democratization was the recent revolution in Egypt sparked by the Tahrir Square protests. He said the Tahrir Square revolution as an example of democratization from below highlights one drawback of this approach. “Democratization from below was effective in ending the old [regime] rather than starting a new [regime],” he said. “The Tahrir Square Revolution ousted the old empire, but it’s hard to tell the influence it will have later.” The importance of women in the liberalization of the Arab world was also highlighted in Egypt’s revolution, Mazrui said. “Women were very visible participants in the Tahrir protests,” he said. “Historically, Egypt led the way with women’s liberation.” Mazrui said the main problem going forward in Egypt is the removal of President Hosni Mubarak, which has left Egyptians thinking they can remove each succeeding president. “Egyptian populations feel if you have appointed a President and he has not delivered the goods that you want, then you should throw him out,” Mazrui said. “It is a ridiculous situation in Egypt because it has resulted in major reverses in the social liberalizations and the deaths of at least a thousand people since the uprisings took off.”  Mazrui said the number of pro-democratic uprisings in the Arab world in recent years is unprecedented in the course of history. He also said this democratization in the Arab world can continue, especially if the secrets of revolutions like those of Ataturk and Tahrir Square are uncovered and employed. “[The] empowerment of women to the top of the political scale is one such secret,” Mazrui said.last_img read more

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