Temperature dependence and acclimatory response of amylase in the High Arctic springtail Onychiurus arcticus (Tullberg) compared with the temperate species Protaphorura armata (Tullberg)

first_imgAmylolytic activity was measured in whole body homogenates of High Arctic (Onychiurus arcticus) and temperate (Protaphorura armata) springtails (Collembola: Onychiuridae) in the temperature range 5–55°C. A pH of ca. 8 was optimum for amylolytic activity in both species. A higher weight-specific amylolytic activity was observed in P. armata. In O. arcticus, amylolytic activity depended on thermal acclimation, which increased during 2 and 9 weeks of cold acclimation (5°C) and decreased over 7 weeks of warming (15°C) of animals that were previously acclimated to cold for 2 weeks. In cold-acclimated O. arcticus, a slower decrease of amylolytic activity occurred with lowering of temperature in the range 5–20°C in comparison with warm-acclimated specimens and P. armata, which resulted in higher activity at 5°C. The activation energy calculated from an Arrhenius plot for P. armata was 68.7 kJ.mol−1. In O. arcticus it was between 30.2 and 61.5 kJ.mol−1, being lower in cold-acclimated samples. The temperature optimum for amylolytic activity was higher in the temperate species (40°C), whilst in O. arcticus it depended on the acclimation regime: it rose to 35°C after warm acclimation and decreased to 20°C after cold adaptation. The total soluble protein content of body tissues of O. arcticus also increased during cold acclimation. These differences between the two species suggest that amylolytic activity is an indicator of cold adaptation in the High Arctic O. arcticus.last_img read more

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Visual fields and foraging in procellariiform seabirds: sensory aspects of dietary segregation

first_imgRetinal visual fields were determined using an ophthalmoscopic reflex technique in two seabird species of the family Procellariidae: white-chinned petrel Procellaria aequinoctialis and antarctic prion Pachyptila desolata. The binocular fields of both species show a similar shape but they differ in size and in the position of the bill within the field. In white-chinned petrels the binocular field extends vertically through approximately 140 degrees and has a maximum width of approximately 40 degrees. The bill is placed approximately central within the field. The binocular field of the prions is approximately half this width and vertical extent, and the bill is placed close to the ventral edge. These differences in binocular field topography can be correlated with the different foraging techniques that these birds employ when seeking a similar diet within the same environment. White-chinned petrels pursue individual items both at the surface and while diving to moderate depths. Antarctic prions feed primarily by filtering items from surface waters. These differences in visual field topography mirror those found in different terrestrial bird species that primarily employ visual or tactile cues in the pursuit of food items. White-chinned petrel eyes and visual fields show features of an amphibious optical design similar to those found in penguins and albatrosses. Copyright (C) 2001 S. Karger AG. Basel.last_img read more

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Rolls-Royce bags contract for John Lewis-class oilers

first_img View post tag: NASSCO US Navy’s John Lewis-class oilers to be powered by Rolls-Royce generators October 18, 2016 View post tag: Rolls-Royce View post tag: John Lewis-class Equipment & technologycenter_img View post tag: US Navy Rolls-Royce announced that it has signed a contract to supply diesel generators, propellers and shaft lines for the U.S. Navy’s new fleet replenishment oiler ships, the John Lewis-class.With a total of 17 ships to be built, the new John Lewis class (previously known as TAO – X) is designed to increase the US Navy’s capability to transfer fuel to its surface ships, in operations around the globe.For each ship, Rolls-Royce will supply two Kamewa 150A controllable pitch propellers (CPP), whilst two Bergen B32:40xL8A generator sets will provide power to satisfy on board energy requirements.Don Roussinos, Rolls-Royce, President – Naval, said: “This contract renews our long-standing relationship with General Dynamics’ NASSCO shipyard in San Diego, where construction of the first vessel will commence next year. “Rolls-Royce controllable pitch propellers, produced at our facility in Walpole Massachusetts, have been powering the US Navy fleet for many years, and we’re delighted that the John Lewis Class will continue this for decades to come.”Each ship will have capacity to carry 156,000 barrels of fuel oil and provide significant dry cargo capacity, aviation capability and will operate at speeds of up to 20 knots.Rolls-Royce said the contract covers the first ship, with options for five more, in a project which plans to see 17 new ships built at the rate of one per year. Equipment for the lead ship is scheduled for delivery in 2018. Back to overview,Home naval-today US Navy’s John Lewis-class oilers to be powered by Rolls-Royce generators Share this articlelast_img read more

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EPD SWAT Team Attends Tactical Medical Training

first_imgIn many high risk situations, the first emergency workers to encounter injured civilians are police officers. With that in mind, the EPD SWAT Team attended Tactical Medical training this week. The training included bleeding control using tourniquets and bandaging for self-aid and aid to others, the importance of establishing and maintaining airway, using chest seals for victims with penetrating wounds to the chest, preventing and treating patients that are in shock, and evacuating patients from the HOT zone to the casualty collection point where EMS would be staged.EPD Officers Lenny Reed and Ryan Winters were the instructors for this training. They recently returned from Cypress Creek EMS in Spring Texas where they provided medical training for officers from around the country.As the role of police officers evolves, so does our training. We are proud to play an active role in educating officers and preparing them to be #‎WarriorHealers. #CCEMS.COMFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Bendix Woods County Park is ready to celebrate all things Maple

first_img Pinterest Facebook WhatsApp WhatsApp By Tommie Lee – February 3, 2021 0 300 Google+ Twitter Google+ (Kim Closson) The Bendix Woods County Park will offer public Maple Syrup programs in place of their Sugar Camp Days this year.The two programs will happen in March at the park on Timothy Road in New Carlisle. A Sweet Trees program will happen on March 6, and a Maple Sugar Stroll on March 27-28.Sweet Trees: Sap, Syrup and All Things Maple will take place on Saturday, March 6 from 11:00 am to 3:00 pm. Tour the sugar bush in a family or household group, tap a tree, hang a bucket, and visit the sugar house. After your adventure, enjoy hot drinks and a maple treat. Each group will take home a half-pint of pure Bendix Woods maple syrup! The fee is $15 per group of up to six people, and advance registration is required by March 3.Maple Sugar Stroll will take place on Saturday, March 27 and Sunday, March 28 from 10:00 am to 4:00 pm. Sign up for a time slot to visit the sugar bush and see traditional Native American and Pioneer sugaring methods. At the sugar house, see modern syrup production. The fee is $10 per group of up to six people, and advance registration is required by March 24. Syrup will be available for purchase.Bendix Woods County Park’s main entrance is located on Timothy Road in New Carlisle, just south of State Road 2, nine miles west of the US 20/31 bypass. Facebook Bendix Woods County Park is ready to celebrate all things Maple Twitter Pinterest IndianaLocalNewsSouth Bend Market Previous articleIndiana’s U.S. Senators want the ’22 Games moved from BeijingNext articleWinter Weather Advisory: Snow up to 4 inches before temps crash on Friday Tommie Leelast_img read more

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Bookings open for dinner and dance

first_imgKingston & District Master Bakers Association is to host a special dinner and dance in honour of the Queen’s 86th birthday, her Jubilee year and Saint George’s Day.The triple celebration will take place on Saturday 21 April, at The Oatlands Park Hotel in Surrey and will feature a four-course meal followed by dancing.There will be a traditional British menu and Royal Jubilee theme for the evening, said the Association.It has reduced the ticket price this year from £57 to £50, in response to the tough economic climate. For more information contact Anthony Kindred on 0207 642 0799 or to make a reservation contact the Association’s treasurer Jackie Harrington on 01372 373435.last_img read more

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Beef industry

first_imgBeef may be ‘what’s for dinner,’ but it’s also a big deal in Georgia agriculture — injecting about $409 million a year into the state’s economy and providing a livelihood for hundreds of Georgia families. That makes Jacob Seger’s new job as University of Georgia Cooperative Extension beef cattle specialist personal. He’s responsible for helping Georgia’s cattle producers make the most of their herds and for helping beef consumers have a better understanding of their hamburgers and steaks. After several years of drought, hay shortages and now, problems caused by too much rain — he gets questions all the time from farmers trying to improve production efficiency in their herds. “It is my job to provide timely, accurate and comprehensive information to producers and consumers alike. Helping people to translate scientific research into terms that they can understand, and hopefully use, is extremely important, and, to me, typifies the mission of world class land-grant universities like UGA,” Segers said. Segers describes his new position as a dream job. The Georgia native and UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences alum recently concluded a three and a half year stint at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The majority of his UGA work, 85 percent, will focus on keeping county agents, farmers and consumers informed on the most current topics and technologies available to the beef industry. “Regardless of how good our product is or how many advances we make, those advancements are only as good as consumers’ perception of our product,” Segers said. “Hopefully, we’re going to get some stuff done to try to assess consumer perception when they walk into a grocery store. What influences their buying decisions? What’s more important to them? Hopefully, that will give us some information on what we need to focus on in terms of managing our cattle.”Segers grew up in north Georgia, near Jasper. His grandparents raised commercial cows when he was a child. He quickly became involved in 4-H and FFA in middle school and high school. Segers attended UGA and was on the 2007 Livestock Judging Team with coach Jary Douglas. He also became a recruiter for the animal and dairy science department. While in graduate school at UGA, he worked closely with the Georgia Cattleman’s Association. Segers will once again work alongside cattle farmers in what has emerged as a booming business statewide. The new Extension specialist sees his UGA job as a way of paying back those who helped him in his career. “That’s why it’s a dream come true for me. I get to come back and help the people who helped me,” he said.If the state’s industry is to continue to succeed, Segers believes it starts with consumers and discovering what their needs and wants are.He will also teach courses at UGA’s Tifton Campus. Segers will teach Grazing Animal Production and Management when UGA’s spring semester starts in January 2014. He describes the class as a hybrid between beef production and forages.“Extension in Georgia is a model program nationwide, the way that we have our county agents set up and our county delivery system is just excellent,” Segers said. “For me it’s coming home. The opportunity to come back and give back to the program that’s totally responsible for every success that I’ve had, there’s no way I would have been able to stay in animal agriculture or be a part of the things I’ve been a part of had it not been for Extension, 4-H and FFA here in Georgia.”For more information about how UGA Extension helps beef producers maximize the potential of their herds, visit caes.uga.edu/commodities.last_img read more

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INSIDE A THRU-HIKER’S PACK

first_imgZach Davis had never been backpacking before he started thru-hiking the Appalachian Trail in 2011.  “I was working in internet marketing and in a rut, and thought something far out of my comfort zone could be just what the doctor ordered.”Now, Davis lives and breathes thru-hiking. He wrote Appalachian Trials, a book designed to help thru-hikers prepare for their journey, and runs a website called The Trek, where long-distance backpackers can blog about their experiences and learn from each other.Davis also created the Badger Sponsorship, where he hooks up worthy thru-hikers with gear for their trek. Last year, Davis gave away more than $10,000 worth of backpacking gear. Here are Davis’ five favorite gear essentials, in his own words.Montbell Plasma 1000 Alpine Down Parka ($379)It’s expensive, but worth every penny. Montbell uses 1000 fill Power Goose Down to pack a lot of warmth for little weight (8.4 ounces). The exterior is thin, so you have to exercise caution—a wayward fire ember or a tent zipper could easily tear through the fabric. But it’s a worthwhile tradeoff for a jacket that has so much insulation but comes in at just half a pound.Darn Tough Socks ($23 for the new Uncle Buck)It’s not the sexiest recommendation, but the importance of a quality pair of merino wool socks can’t be understated. Not only are Darn Toughs the most durable and comfortable brand of merino socks out there, but they back up their product with a lifetime guarantee. In their own words, “if you wear a hole in them, we will replace them free of charge, for life.”Thule Versant 50L ($240)The main torso panel and the hip belt of this pack can slide several inches before being Velcroed into place, allowing you to dial in the support to your exact torso length and waist. The rain guard allows you to reach the water bottle pockets without taking off the shell.Sony a6000 ($549 and up)Mirrorless cameras are the ideal solution for photographers who want all the quality of a DSLR without the weight. The Sony a6000 is mirrorless, with interchangeable lenses and a really fast autofocus. The price is reasonable, given the caliber of capture.Altra Lone Peak 3.0 ($120)I have a freakishly wide foot. Altra uses a “FootShape Toe Box,” which is unusually wide to allow your toes to splay out naturally. Altra is quietly taking over the thru-hiking world, and for good reason. The newest model, the Lone Peak 3.0, is both comfortable and durable.Enlightened Equipment Revelation Quilt ($270)There’s a growing trend for thru-hikers to swap their traditional mummy style sleeping bags for a quilt, which are significantly lighter without compromising on warmth. Compressed down insulation under a sleeping hiker is mostly useless. A quilt removes much of the material on the underside, instead clipping together and relying on a sleeping pad to provide insulation for those sleeping on the ground. Enlightened Equipment makes a great quality quilt at a fair price.last_img read more

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British PM Hosts Brazil’s President for Olympic Talks

first_imgBy Dialogo July 27, 2012 Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff visited British Prime Minister David Cameron on July 25, to get some tips on staging the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro. Welcoming Rousseff to his Downing Street residence in London, Cameron said the Olympic connection provided a “great opportunity” for cooperation between Great Britain and Brazil. Rousseff is among 120 national leaders expected to attend the opening ceremony of the London Games on July 27. Cameron said he also wanted to deepen trade ties between Great Britain and Latin America’s dominant power, which overtook Great Britain this year to become the world’s sixth largest economy. Trade between the two countries was worth $8.57 billion in 2011, an increase of just over 10 percent on the previous year. “Obviously we have good opportunities for wide-ranging discussions but also the chance to talk about the Olympics here in London and the Olympics to come in your country next,” Cameron said. For her part, Rousseff expressed, “This is a special moment in time for Brazil-UK relations because Brazil will be the next country to host the Olympic Games in 2016. “It’s our intention to learn lessons from the successful UK experience,” she added.last_img read more

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Has Hammersmith missed the bus?

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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