Zimre Holdings Limited HY2016 Interim Report

first_imgZimRe Holdings Limited (ZIMR.zw) listed on the Zimbabwe Stock Exchange under the Insurance sector has released it’s 2016 interim results for the half year.For more information about ZimRe Holdings Limited (ZIMR.zw) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the ZimRe Holdings Limited (ZIMR.zw) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: ZimRe Holdings Limited (ZIMR.zw)  2016 interim results for the half year.Company ProfileZimRe Holdings Limited operates through subsidiaries to provide solutions for general insurance, health cover, reinsurance, life reassurance, reinsurance brokering and property services for private, commercial and corporate clients in Zimbabwe and overseas. Its insurance products range from short-term and whole-life insurance to endowment pensions, medical aid societies and motor, household and commercial insurance solutions. The company also has interests in producing a range of animal-drawn implements and in property management; maintaining, developing and leasing properties in the residential and commercial property market in Zimbabwe. ZimRe Holdings Limited was founded in 1983 and is based in Harare, Zimbabwe. ZimRe Holdings Limited is listed on the Zimbabwe Stock Exchangelast_img read more

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NICO Holdings Limited (NICO.mw) 2017 Annual Report

first_imgNICO Holdings Limited (NICO.mw) listed on the Malawi Stock Exchange under the Insurance sector has released it’s 2017 annual report.For more information about NICO Holdings Limited (NICO.mw) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the NICO Holdings Limited (NICO.mw) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: NICO Holdings Limited (NICO.mw)  2017 annual report.Company ProfileNICO Holdings Limited provides products and services for general insurance, life insurance and pension administration in the corporate and private sector of Malawi; with interests in banking, asset management and information technology services. NICO Holdings Limited operates in Malawi, Zambia, Tanzania, Uganda, Mozambique and Zimbabwe. It was established in 1965, and was the first general insurance company to list on the Malawi Stock Exchange. Its general insurance division covers segments that range from personal accident and household insurance to construction, engineering, professional indemnity, marine hull and cargo, fire and loss of profits. NICO Holdings Limited also offers insurance for individuals and corporate clients which includes endowment assurance and savings protection. The company has a corporate banking division offering standard products and services, aswell as solutions for foreign exchange, investment management and women business programmes. NICO Holdings Limited has invested in providing technology services to clients, including software and Internet systems and communication solutions, card technology and surveillance systems. NICO Holdings Limited is listed on the Malawi Stock Exchangelast_img read more

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Theological studies ignited transformation of Georgia woman set to die

first_img An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Shreveport, LA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Comments are closed. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books March 2, 2015 at 6:01 pm Thank you for information on this denial. Prayers for her,those who love her, and for forgiving hearts. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Rector Belleville, IL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Submit a Job Listing Rector Tampa, FL Rector Albany, NY Dr. Jürgen Moltmann, Kelly Gissendaner and the Rev. Cathy Zappa at Gissendaner’s graduation from Theological Certificate Program. Photo: Diocese of AtlantaEditor’s note: Georgia Department of Correction officials postponed Kelly Renee Gissendaner’s execution at the last moment March 2 when they became concerned about the purity of the execution drug. No new date has been given, according to the Associated Press.[Episcopal Diocese of Atlanta] An untold story about convicted murderer Kelly Renee Gissendaner is that she is loved and admired by many inmates and others who serve at Lee Arrendale State Prison north of Atlanta.Gissendaner, 47, a graduate of a prison-based theology certificate program, is set to become on March 2 the first woman to be executed in Georgia since 1945.“Kelly has changed; she’s been transformed,” says the Rev. Cathy Zappa, a Diocese of Atlanta priest who has served as Gissendaner’s teacher, spiritual director and chaplain for nearly four years. “Though far from perfect, she is making a positive difference in the prison and beyond.”Zappa directs the Certificate in Theological Studies program at the prison on behalf of four seminaries that are members of the Atlanta Theological Association. She also serves as canon for spirituality and mission at the Cathedral of St. Philip, Atlanta.“Yes, she is remorseful,” says Zappa of Gissendaner, who was found guilty of planning her husband Douglas Gissendaner’s 1997 murder. “But she can’t take back what she’s done.“Kelly’s death will only cause more harm,” Zappa said, “to her friends in prison, to her three children who don’t want to lose their mother. She is changed and transformed and only wants to offer something back to her community.”Speaking out in Gissendaner’s defense, Zappa said, “She has tried to make amends in the way she has lived her life, to work for healing and reconciliation. And she has started living her life in a way that shows penitence for her husband’s death and honors her children, who are also victims of her crime.”Kelly Gissendaner hugs her daughter Kayla at the graduation ceremony. Photo: Diocese of AtlantaZappa was one of several people who on Feb. 25 addressed the Georgia State Board of Pardons and Paroles at a hearing to request clemency for Gissendaner. The board denied the request. Her execution, previously scheduled for later that day, was postponed until March 2 because of bad weather.Zappa told the board that Gissendaner “has had an uplifting impact on my life, on people in the theology program and on other inmates. She has chosen to thrive, as both a person and a Christian, during her incarceration and her death sentence.“Rather than succumbing to bitterness, despair or a sense of victimization, Kelly has become a compassionate, reflective, spiritual and authentic human being. She’s committed to living life to the fullest and to being a blessing in whatever way she can to others in her world.”One of the people in her world is internationally renowned author and professor of systematic theology Jürgen Moltmann of the University of Tübingen, Germany.Gissandaner wrote to him after reading one of his books for her theology foundations course work. They became pen pals, and Moltmann came to visit her and spoke at the certificate program’s 2011 commencement.“Kelly said about their correspondence that she wanted Dr. Moltmann to know how much she’d learned from him,” said Zappa. “He wrote back and said how much he’s learned from her. He sent her a handkerchief, which he said was to hold all her tears.”Many of the women in the theology program look up to Gissendaner and see her as a source of inspiration, hope, and strength. “Over and over,” said Zappa, “I hear phrases like, ‘If Kelly can handle that, then I can handle this,’ or ‘If Kelly can keep faith or stay strong, then so can I.’”When Gissendaner graduated from the theology certificate program in October 2011, she was chosen as the student speaker.From the start of her course work, she said, “Never have I had a hunger like this. I became so hungry for theology, and what all the classes had to offer, you could call me a glutton. I’ve now added in thirst for the accomplishment of my dream to continue the study of theology.“I challenge you to step up the next level of your character, growth, and development,” she told them. “In all of us, there are untapped abilities. I encourage you to write that book, start that ministry, teach, study, pursue your dream.”Gissendaner went on to remind them that “suffering can be redeemed. There is only One who can bring a clean thing out of something unclean, or turn a tragedy into a triumph, and a loser into a winner. When this miracle occurs, and only through Divine grace, our life is not wasted. When blind eyes are opened, then we all will see the greater purpose. Let us put off hatred and envy and put on love and compassion. Every day.”In the three years since graduating, Gissendaner continued to take every theology course that was offered at the prison until her final appeal was denied.On Feb. 27, a letter asking government officials to reconsider sparing Kelly’s life was signed by Atlanta Bishop Rob Wright and is being distributed throughout the state. To read the letter, click here.Four participating member schools of the Atlanta Theological Association, which sponsors the Certificate in Theological Studies program, are Candler School of Theology at Emory University, McAfee School of Theology at Mercer University, the Interdenominational Theological Center and Columbia Theological Seminary.— Nan Ross is director of communications for the Diocese of Atlanta. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel March 2, 2015 at 5:08 pm Supreme Court of Georgia has denied Kelly’s appeal. Prayers for time she has left and prayers for her family. Vigil tonight on the square in Clarkesville, Ga at 6:00. May her soul rest in eternal peace. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab The Rev. Susan Creighton says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Bath, NC March 4, 2015 at 3:46 pm Justice may be blind, but it is not always merciful. It certainly sounds as if repentance is genuine and deep. One might think both justice and mercy would be well-served is Kelly’s death sentence were (at the least) commuted to a life sentence. Lord, have mercy. Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Theological studies ignited transformation of Georgia woman set to die Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Comments (3) Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Press Release Service Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Hopkinsville, KY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA By Nan RossPosted Mar 2, 2015 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Featured Events Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Youth Minister Lorton, VA Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Press Release Rector Smithfield, NC The Rev. Mary Janet “Bean” Murray says: John Andrews says: Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MSlast_img read more

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Hôtelières du Rail Offices and Residences / Platform Architect…

first_img Apartments “COPY” CopyApartments, Office Buildings•Nantes, France France Hôtelières du Rail Offices and Residences / Platform ArchitecturesSave this projectSaveHôtelières du Rail Offices and Residences / Platform Architectures Save this picture!© J. Ricolleau+ 11 Share ArchDaily ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/438980/hotelieres-du-rail-offices-and-residences-platform-architectures Clipboard Area:  3415 m² Area:  3415 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project Photographs ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/438980/hotelieres-du-rail-offices-and-residences-platform-architectures Clipboard 2013 Year:  photographs:  J. RicolleauPhotographs:  J. RicolleauSave this picture!© J. RicolleauText description provided by the architects. The building’s façade is punctuated with strategically placed urban windows, underlining the massive scale of the building. The windows’ unique box shape is reinforced by the misaligned shapes which form a contrast with the bare façade.Save this picture!© J. RicolleauThis association, with its unbalanced mass, represents the strong symbolism of the project.Save this picture!© J. RicolleauThe building, which forms a single volume, is divided into two fully independent units: – To the east, a 4-storey office building for SNCF staff – To the west, a 5-storey residence for high-speed train conductors. The western unit’s rooms and common areas are designed as a hotel, with carefully conceived acoustics.Save this picture!© J. RicolleauThe building’s façade is punctuated with urban windows, underlining its massive scale, and strategically located for based on its urban environment. Their unique box shape is reinforced by the misaligned shapes which form a contrast with the bare façade. This association, with its unbalanced mass, represents the strong symbolism of the project.Save this picture!Floor PlanProject gallerySee allShow less100 Urban Trends: A Glossary of IdeasArchitecture NewsSolar Decathlon 2013: Stevens Institute of Technology Places Second in Architecture,…Selected ProjectsProject locationAddress:Nantes, FranceLocation to be used only as a reference. It could indicate city/country but not exact address. Share Hôtelières du Rail Offices and Residences / Platform Architectures Architects: Platform Architectures Area Area of this architecture project “COPY” Year:  2013 Projects CopyAbout this officePlatform ArchitecturesOfficeFollowProductsGlassSteelConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousingApartmentsOfficesOffice buildingsNantesOfficesHousingResidentialOffice BuildingsFrancePublished on October 20, 2013Cite: “Hôtelières du Rail Offices and Residences / Platform Architectures” 20 Oct 2013. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogPartitionsSkyfoldChoosing the Skyfold Wall for Your SpaceGlass3MGlass Finish – FASARA™ GeometricShower ColumnshansgroheShoulder ShowersPanels / Prefabricated AssembliesMorin Corp.Metal Wall Systems – ExposedStonesCosentinoSurfaces – Dekton® Stonika SeriesConcrete FloorsSikaIndustrial Floor CoatingsHanging LampsLouis PoulsenPendant Lights – KeglenDoorsSky-FrameInsulated Sliding Doors – Sky-Frame SlopeThermalSchöckMinimizing Thermal Bridges in BalconiesWindowspanoramah!®ah! Ultra MinimalistEnclosures / Double Skin FacadesAlucoilStructural Honeycomb Panels – LarcoreWork ChairsDynamobelWork Chair – SLAT 16More products »Save世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my streamlast_img read more

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Localgiving announces 2017 Local Hero campaign & Small Charity Week Match Fund

first_imgLocalgiving announces 2017 Local Hero campaign & Small Charity Week Match Fund AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis10  125 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis10 Localgiving’s 2017 Local Hero campaign opens on 1st April, with every active fundraising page on Localgiving eligible for a chance to win extra funds,Localgiving has £5,000 to award in the Local Hero campaign, which will be split between the causes supported by the top 20 fundraisers in April. Participants will be ranked according to the number of unique online donors from which they secure a donation during April. The top fundraiser will once again receive £1,000 for their chosen cause, with those in second to fifth place receiving £500, sixth-tenth place receiving £200, and those in places 11-20 receiving £100 each for their cause.Participants must have an active Localgiving page, and ask people to sponsor them at any time between the 1st and 30th of April. Each fundraising page will be automatically included in the campaign and the more people that sponsor the page, the higher up the leaderboard it will rank.Small Charity Week Match FundLater in the year, in June, Localgiving will also be supporting small charities with its Small Charity Week Match Fund. For one day only, starting at 10am on Thursday 22nd June, Localgiving will be doubling one-time donations to local charities pound-for-pound by up to £25. Charities and community groups that are members of Localgiving will have a maximum of £250 of match funding available to them.The campaign will take place on Fundraising Day as part of Small Charity Week 2017, launching at 10:00 and running until the fund runs out, or 23:59 – whichever comes first.To get involved in this event, charities must make sure they have an active Localgiving membership. All groups with an active Localgiving membership will be automatically eligible for match funding through the campaign.  124 total views,  1 views today Advertisement Tagged with: Funding Localgiving small charities Melanie May | 22 March 2017 | News About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com.last_img read more

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I Don’t Like to Say I Told You So, But…

first_imgHome Commentary I Don’t Like to Say I Told You So, But… Previous articleEllspermann Makes Big Impression in AsiaNext articleWeather Continues to Challenge Crops Gary Truitt By Gary Truitt Facebook Twitter Facebook Twitter By Gary Truitt – Jun 30, 2014 center_img I Don’t Like to Say I Told You So, But… Chipotle, a chain of Mexican restaurants, has been public enemy No. 1 for American farmers for the past 2 years.  As part of its food culture marketing campaign, Chipotle engaged in egregious name calling, fact distorting, and outright slander against the American farmer. All this was in an effort to convince customers that its food was better, safer, and more sustainable than what customers could get down the street.  Farm groups have tried to communicate, educate, and even placate Chipotle, but to no avail.  Almost 2 years ago, I wrote a column that suggested we were wasting our time because Chipotle did not want to be educated about the truth — that it had a marketing plan that was working and that was all it cared about. Now I can say, I told you so.I suggested at the time the Chipotle video stirred up the hornets’ nest of anger, that the goal was not to make farmers mad but simply to sell more product. Recent facts have come to light that prove that fact. Once praised by the local, organic, free range, anti-GMO, simple, sustainable, and humane crowd, Chipotle has now found itself being harshly criticized by the very people it was trying to impress.  It turns out that Chipotle likes to say it is different when, in reality, it acts just like any other big national restaurant chain.For example, Chipotle doesn’t do all of its own cooking: some is done by an outside company, the same one that makes McDonald’s McNuggets, Big Macs, and McRibs. Chipotle’s website says its “fresh cooking” is done “using classic culinary techniques — no shortcuts.” But Chipotle doesn’t do all of its own cooking: two outside processing companies in Chicago, OSI and Miniat Holdings, braise the carnitas and barbacoa, trim the steaks, cook the beans, and make the bases for the restaurant’s green and red tomatillo salsas.Another issue that is not going over well is the fact that Chipotle is importing grass-fed beef from Australia. Last month, Chipolte CEO Steve Ells announced that the company was sourcing grass-fed beef from Australia, saying “The U.S. supply isn’t growing quickly enough to match our demand.” Many US grass-fed producers says this is a load of “bull”. Several US cattle organizations are claiming they were never contacted by the chain and that they have producers in the US who would be willing to meet the need.Chipotle’s ingredients include GMOs and trans fats. What??? How can this be? Despite backing GMO labeling, Chipotle’s tortillas and tortilla chips are still made with GMO corn and soybean oil. The tortillas are also made with hydrogenated oils, better known as trans fats. According to the Buzz Feed news service, Chipotle chefs are also looking for ways to make tortillas without hydrogenated oils and lard.The chain is also is finding that its way of doing business is not politically correct with the social justice crowd. Chipotle’s two CEOs were paid a combined $49.5 million in 2013, while the average entry-level employee salary starts at $21,000. Contrast this with IKEA which announced this past week that they were going to pay all their employees a living wage that, in most cases, is well above minimum wage.So all you ag advocates, bloggers, and farmer activists: you can lay off picking on Chipotle for a while. Its former supporters are doing a great job of showcasing what Chipotle’s food culture is really all about: profits for Chipotle. Told you! SHARE SHARElast_img read more

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Faculty brainstorms how to increase diversity at TCU

first_imgNia Brookinshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/nia-brookins/ Provost recommends decentralized testing centers Welcome TCU Class of 2025 TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history ReddIt New university committee caters to diversity and inclusion TCU Faculty Senate diversity featured image World Oceans Day shines spotlight on marine plastic pollution Nia Brookinshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/nia-brookins/ + posts Previous articleFrog Report – Kansas Recap and West Virginia PreviewNext articleStudents squeezed at Market Square, renovations looming Nia Brookins RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Linkedin Nia Brookins is a multimedia journalist from Fort Worth, Texas studying writing and journalism. In her free time she likes to make music and write poetry. ReddItcenter_img Tuition to increase 4.9 percent next school year printThe faculty senate discussed TCU at their meeting in the Brown-Lupton University Union Chambers on Thursday. According to the United States July 2015 Census, 61.6 percent of individuals in the U.S. identify as Caucasian and 38.4 percent identify as minority. In Texas, 43 percent of citizens identify as Caucasian and 57 percent identify as minority. As of 2010, 41.7 percent of residents in Fort Worth identify as Caucasian and 58.3 percent of residents identify as minority. The most racially diverse student body ever at TCU is the class of 2020, consisting of 22 percent minority students, according to the faculty senate. Recently, a group of students submitted a list of demands to the administration that expressed the desire for more diversity awareness on campus.TCU’s faculty is currently 14 percent non-Caucasian, and TCU’s faculty senate is less than 8 percent non-Caucasian. The faculty senate chair Jesus Castro-Balbi pointed this out as a problem and asked faculty senators to discuss this. “How can we fulfill our mission statement with such a lack of diversity?” Castro-Balbi asked.Faculty Senators listening to Chair Jesus Castro-Balbi discuss diversity on Thursday.Faculty members responded with dissenting opinions. Jan Quesada, a religion instructor, said the department of religion is trying to create a more diverse environment, but it is a constant struggle attracting a more diverse pool of students. “It’s a constant tug-of-war to investigate what you can legally do without being prejudicial,” Quesada said. Senator Jan Quesada speaking on diversity.Some faculty members suggested expanding the Community Scholars program and creating an administration strategy. These suggestions may be solutions geared toward a more diverse environment. Pamela Frable, an associate professor in the Harris College of Nursing and Health Sciences, noted that racial diversity is not the only category of diversity TCU has been grappling with. “Some of our students come from challenged backgrounds, but that is hidden and they stay hidden,” Frable said. “Faith differences, geographic differences make people diverse.”Billy Farmer, an assistant professor of professional practice in the department of computer science, said we should simply look for the best people for faculty jobs. “The best thing to do is be blind to the whole aspect of race and gender,” Farmer said. “That’s what needs to be the center.”David Sandell, an associate professor in the department of sociology and anthropology, said we should investigate how well TCU is doing with culture and inclusivity. “I’m not sure how well we’re doing,” Sandell said. “Is there a way that we can assess that?”Faculty senators listening to a senator on the front row speak.As faculty senators were talking about diversity, the meeting was adjourned due to time. It is unclear as to whether or not this conversation will be ongoing, but Castro-Balbi said it is important to talk about something that affects TCU so much.“Diversity is a big topic in the world right now,” Castro-Balbi said. “It is always around us, so we need to be having these conversations.”The Faculty Senate meets monthly in the BLUU Chambers. For more information, visit their webpage. Twitter TAGSphotos Nia Brookinshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/nia-brookins/ Nia Brookinshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/nia-brookins/ Linkedin Twitter Facebook Best-selling author tells stories at local library Nia Brookins Facebooklast_img read more

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Covert action and national security

first_imgIvan Cholakov/iStockBy MICK MULROYThis paper explains covert action, the need for it to be more thoroughly integrated into the U.S. National Security Strategy, and advocates for it to be fully resourced.Covert Action and the CIACovert action is a tool U.S. policymakers employ to meet U.S. national security objectives. Title 50 of the United States Code defines covert action as an activity or activities to influence political, economic, or military conditions abroad, where it is intended that the role of the United States will not be apparent or acknowledged publicly. Covert actions are the most highly classified, politically sensitive, and some of the most dangerous activities our nation undertakes. The National Security Act of 1947 established the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) and assigned it the mission of conducting covert action on behalf of the United States, thereby continuing the legacy inherited from its World War II-era predecessor, the Office of Strategic Services (OSS). The OSS was a U.S. military organization but had semi-autonomous status and direct access to the President. Officers of the OSS carried out human intelligence, influence, and paramilitary operations. Paramilitary operations were conducted by the legendary Jedburgh Teams and Operations Groups (small teams built to operate behind enemy lines with little or no support). The paramilitary component of the CIA is the direct descendant of these teams and groups.Nearly four decades after the CIA was established, President Ronald Reagan reinforced its primacy in the covert world with executive order 12333 in 1984 (as did several Intelligence Authorization Act provisions and Section 3093 of Title 50). The US government conducted a study on who was best to conduct covert paramilitary operations and found that the CIA should be the sole government agency conducting covert action, and this was confirmed by the President.Paramilitary and influence operations are the two main components of covert action. These are also referred to as special activities. Covert actions are carried out by many CIA elements with support and direction from the Special Activities Center (SAC). SAC is responsible for maintaining the infrastructure and personnel necessary to conduct covert action missions.Covert action is deniable by the U.S. government and, by extension, our partners and allies. Clandestine operations conducted by the CIA and the Department of Defense (DoD) are intended to hide the identity of who performed the activities. But clandestine operations are not legally deniable.Deniability changes political calculations. For the United States, the disclosure of the overt and attributable presence in conflict or denied areas is a sensitive issue. It can negatively impact the pursuit of U.S. national security objectives. The presence of forces operating under the CIA is kept secret by the United States and its partners worldwide.Covert and clandestine operations conducted under Title 50 authorities require small, highly adaptable teams of people rather than large and conspicuous military units.Operating in denied areas with these small teams is inherently risky, but these risks are weighed carefully when covert action authorities are given.The President of the United States writes findings to authorize and direct the CIA to conduct covert action. This fact is often overlooked by CIA detractors, many of whom blame the CIA for policies and activities that they disagree with politically. The President has the authority to start and stop any covert action at any time and is responsible for the policy, just like diplomatic efforts or military operations.Congressional OversightCongress also plays a critical oversight and resourcing role in covert action. Section 3091 of Title 50 requires the President to keep congressional intelligence oversight committees fully and currently informed of intelligence activities, including covert actions. The elected representatives of the American people scrutinize the operations, expenses, and the effectiveness of these programs. This vital function developed over time and is now very much a part of U.S. covert activities. Effective and developed oversight is one reason why covert action remains under the CIA’s purview.Measures of EffectivenessSince the CIA was established in 1947, it has run many publicized, not-so-well publicized, and still secret covert operations. CIA officers undertook the first covert action against North Korea in the Korean War. Over the following decades, the agency conducted covert action in Laos, Vietnam, Cuba, Angola, Afghanistan, Iraq, Pakistan, Syria, Somalia, Libya, Yemen, and many other parts of the world. While some programs have been very successful and others less so, the CIA, like any professional organization, has shown a commitment to learning from past actions to adapt and improve.The key to successes like these is to develop and assess objective measures of effectiveness (MOE) for each program and adjust them based on the assessment’s findings. This MOE assessment is something that is done regularly during current operations. It is, after all, more important to adjust a program that needs adjustment while it is being executed, rather than wait until completion.The CIA publishes the Case Studies Intelligence as a full review of past operations. These case studies take a detailed look at covert action programs through the lens of history and the benefit of time.  These retrospective views are invaluable to improving capabilities, identifying actions that added to the overall effort and actions that detracted from it. As programs are declassified over time, it is also essential that our actions, be they overt or covert, be published after the declassification period has expired as an added safeguard to ensure that they reflect our society’s values (media stories often portray partner operations conducted in a negative light. More often than not these stories are untrue and would require an entire generation of paramilitary and military personnel to ignore the alleged human rights violations reported. It is difficult to defend unacknowledged programs. History, however, will prove those reports are not true.).Inter-agency Cooperation and SupportThe CIA collaborates with many departments and agencies of the U.S. government in a set of processes and forums typically referred to as the interagency. This includes and most commonly refers to the Department of State, the Department of Defense, the Director of National Intelligence, and other U.S. Government agencies, as required.The CIA has a strong and close relationship with DoD, and particularly with U.S. Special Operations Command. That close working relationship was essential to many successes after 9/11, including support to Northern Alliance in Afghanistan to topple the Taliban; the locating and killing of Osama bin Ladin; the partnership with Kurdish Peshmerga in Iraq to defeat the terrorist organization Ansar Al-Islam (precursor to Al-Qaeda in Iraq) and take on and defeat Saddam Hussein’s conventional forces at the beginning of the Iraq War; and the locating and killing of Abu Bakr Al-Baghdadi, the former head of the Islamic State, and many more known and unknown examples.Per media reporting, there is an ongoing review of DoD assets that are detailed to the CIA. Although limited by DoD standards, these resources are significant to many ongoing CIA operations in counter-terrorism and other areas. This cooperative effort has had a substantial positive impact on U.S. national security and should continue. If not, the CIA should be increased in personnel and budget to make up for the withdrawal of these assets.The CIA’s covert action infrastructure (CAI) capabilities should also be fully funded to ensure they can execute the mission they are given and do not have to rebuild them in the next crisis.  This Covert Action Fund within the CIA should be sufficient to operate all CAI capabilities within SAC and separate them from the operating budget to perform intelligence collection in the mission centers.  This fund should consider the increased role the CIA will play in counter-terrorism, as DoD shifts to the higher priorities as described in the current National Security Strategy.  CIA covert action will also shift to these higher objectives of great powers competition and rogue state actors.Nation Security StrategyThe 2017 National Security Strategy was an inter-agency product that characterized the world according to revisionist powers. The 2018 National Defense Strategy that came from it placed the global power competitors of China and Russia as the top priorities. The rogue state actors of North Korea and Iran followed by counter-terrorism. These are the correct priorities based on their actual comprehensive threat to the country and the significance they present to the future political, economic, and security well-being of the United States. As a result, all departments and agencies should adjust their efforts and resources to reflect this policy decision.The Irregular Warfare Annex to the National Defense Strategy called for the capabilities that the U.S. developed in irregular warfare during the war on terrorism to be shifted to the higher priorities of the NDS of rogue state actors and great-power competitors. This will, of course, require adjustments as many of those capabilities are direct action and will not be used often in the absence of war against great power competitors, but they may against rogue state actors. More importantly, the adaptation and ingenuity developed over the last couple of decades need to be focused on all our adversaries. This Annex also calls on the entire joint force to be involved in the effort and not just U.S. military special operations.In addition to the Irregular Warfare Annex that focuses on the irregular warfare capability in the DoD, there should be a Covert Action Annex to the National Security Strategy. Too often, covert action has been used to make up for the lack of a coherent national security policy and as a last-ditch effort to do something about a problem that was too difficult for our other pillars of national power to tackle. This is not an effective way to use covert action. The most effective way is to support a comprehensive policy in which each pillar has a defined role in working toward a national objective.ConclusionCovert action is evaluated, assessed for its effectiveness, and overseen by congress. It should be fully funded, allowing all CAI elements to operate separately from foreign intelligence collection and analysis. The United States should also create a stand-alone but fully integrated annex to the National Security Strategy that defines where covert action will contribute.There are many tools U.S. national security policymakers can use to meet their objectives; covert action is only one of them. Although they are often overdramatized in media and entertainment, misrepresented by critics who understand the difficulty in defending actions that cannot be acknowledged, they play an essential role in the nation’s defense.Countless CIA officers have served under great hardship carrying out a covert action; some gave the ultimate sacrifice. Through these times, they have developed expertise that cannot be easily duplicated. Their skills and professionalism should be fully applied to all of the problems facing the United States.Michael “Mick” Patrick Mulroy is a former Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for the Middle East, a retired Paramilitary Operations Officer in the CIA’s Special Activities Center, and a retired U.S. Marine. He is a Senior Fellow for National Security and Defense Policy with the Middle East Institute, a National Security Analyst for ABC News, and the Lobo Institute’s Co-founder.Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Production begins from CNOOC’s Liuhua oilfield joint development project

first_img The project is expected to have a peak production capacity of 72,800bpd of crude oil. (Credit: Kristina Kasputienė from Pixabay) China’s state-owned offshore oil and gas firm China National Offshore Oil Corporation (CNOOC) has commenced production at the 16-2 oilfield / 20-2 oilfield joint development project.The project, which is located in the Eastern South China Sea, is part of the Liuhua cluster.The Liuhua oil fields project includes the joint development of the Liuhua 16-2, 20-2 and 21-2 oil fields. The three fields are located in the South China Sea in water depths ranging from 380m to 430m.Located at an average water depth of 410m, the 16-2 oilfield/20-2 oilfield development project includes one 150,000 DWT floating production storage and offloading (FPSO) and three underwater production systems.A total of 26 wells will be developed as part of the projectCNOOC said that a total of 26 development wells will commence production and development at the project site.The project is expected to have a peak production capacity of 72,800bpd of crude oil which is expected in 2022.CNOOC owns 100% interest in the Liuhua joint development project.In June, CNOOC started production from the Luda 21-2/16-3 regional development project located in Liaodong Bay of Bohai Sea. It lies about 39km north of Luda 10-1 oilfield.With an average water depth of about 25m, the project is 90km northwest of Suizhong 36-1 onshore terminal.The Luda 21-2/16-3 regional development project is anticipated to reach its peak production capacity in 2022, producing nearly 25,600 barrels of crude oil per day.It project includes one central platform, three wellhead platforms and one production adjective platform. A total of 69 wells are planned to be developed as part of the project. The 16-2 oilfield/20-2 oilfield development project includes one 150,000 DWT FPSO and three underwater production systemslast_img read more

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New Councilman Pledges ‘Open Door Policy’

first_imgThird Ward City Councilman Jody Levchuk is pictured with his daughters, Leni and Jordyn, and wife, Jill. (Photo courtesy Jody Levchuk Facebook page) By DONALD WITTKOWSKIOcean City residents Saturday urged newly elected Councilman Jody Levchuk to help ease flooding in their neighborhoods, repair deteriorated roads and to preserve a large tract of land in the midsection of town for open space.Levchuk, who was sworn in July 1 as the new Third Ward councilman, held a Zoom and teleconference meeting with residents to formally introduce himself and to listen to any concerns or suggestions from the public.In opening remarks, he told residents not to hesitate to call or email him or to stop by his house or his Boardwalk businesses to speak with him in person. His contact information is listed under the “City Council” tab on the city’s municipal website at ocnj.us.“I have an open door policy,” Levchuk said.Along with Ocean City’s three other ward councilmen, Levchuk plans to hold a series of meetings in coming months to speak with constituents in an open forum. His first meeting Saturday was held remotely because of the coronavirus pandemic.After some early technical glitches with the meeting’s audio feed, Levchuk spoke of his background growing up in Ocean City, his love for the beach town, his family’s ownership of the Jilly’s Boardwalk businesses and his plan to hit the ground running as a new councilman.“I have a lot of things on my mind and a lot of things I want to accomplish in the next four years,” he said.The Third Ward represented by Levchuk stretches from the south side of 12th Street to the north side of 26th Street, a diverse area that includes residential neighborhoods, commercial areas and a large section of the Boardwalk.In the heart of the Third Ward is a full block of vacant property that runs along Haven and Simpson avenues between 16th and 17th streets next to the Ocean City Community Center.Formerly the site of the Perry-Egan car dealership, the city has been trying to acquire the property from the private owners to preserve it as open space instead of seeing it developed for housing.Prompted by a question from a resident about the site, Levchuk made it clear that “the last thing” he wants to see is the property turned into a housing project.He said he supports the city’s efforts to preserve it for open space. The strategically located parcel would help to create a corridor of public land stretching from 15th to 20th streets. It would connect the city’s Emil Palmer Park, the Community Center and other public facilities within the five-block area.The proposed housing site at 16th Street and Simpson Avenue is being sought by the city for open space.The city has voted to condemn the site and plans to seize it through its power of eminent domain. It has offered the owners just over $6.5 million for the land, but the final price is expected to be decided by the courts.Expressing confidence that the city will acquire the site, Levchuk indicated that it is just a matter of time before the price is worked out.“It just seems that everything is moving in the right direction,” he said.Other topics raised by residents during the ward meeting included flooding, the condition of some of the city’s streets, overbuilding in residential areas and concerns whether sediment buildup in the lagoons may be caused by the construction of a protective rock wall near a neighboring small island.Most of the concerns focused on flooding throughout the city. One resident, Warren Reiner, of 100 W. 17th Street, said he has been appealing to the city for eight years to solve flooding in his neighborhood.“It makes it impossible to get to or from our home,” Reiner told Levchuk of the flooding.Levchuk noted that he has been speaking with an Ocean City flooding committee about ways to mitigate stormwater.“I’m definitely on top of it,” he said.Another resident, Kathi Dwyer, of 2004 West Ave., complained that some of the streets in her neighborhood were in such “deplorable condition” that a woman fell down while walking along the road.“There are a lot of crevices and what not in the street,” Dwyer said.Flooding in Ocean City, seen here during the tropical storm on July 10, is a major concern of residents.Dwyer said she believes that neighborhood flooding has eroded the streets. She urged Levchuk to have the city repave the roads and alleys in her neighborhood.Levchuk told residents that he was taking notes and repeatedly assured them he would respond to their questions. They thanked him in return.To close the nearly hour-long meeting, Levchuk said he has been in almost daily contact with City Council President Bob Barr to discuss an array of city issues. He also thanked the members of Council for the warm reception he has received as a new member of the governing body.“I think we’re going to be a great team,” he said.last_img read more

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